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Tag:Kurt Coleman
Posted on: October 18, 2011 7:31 pm
 

Eye on Football NFL Awards: Week 6

Posted by Will Brinson



Every week, our NFL experts will hand out the Eye on Football hardware to the best of the best from the NFL week that was.

Week 3 NFL Awards
Expert Offense Defense STeams Coach
Freeman  Rodgers  Revis  Hester Schwartz
Prisco   Gore Coleman  Hester  Morris
Brinson Bradshaw  Revis  Hester Schwartz
Katzowitz Bradhsaw Coleman  Hester  Zimmer
Wilson  Cutler Coleman  Hester Harbaugh

Week 6 was -- quite obviously -- all about the handshake. But there are other awards to get to as well. And the Eye on Offense Award was a hotly contested little battle here, but Ahmad Bradshaw, with 104 yards and three teeters in a Giants win, takes home the hardware.

On defense, things were a bit of a toss-up too, as Darrelle Revis' pick six garnered him plenty of support. But Kurt Coleman's three-pick game won the day. Although, yes, we are checking with the judges on whether or not Rex Grossman was eligible.

We're just going to go ahead and rename the Eye on Special Teams Award the Weekly Contest to Be Better Than Devin Hester.

And, as mentioned, coaching was a toss-up too, but Jim Harbaugh gets the Eye on Coaching Award ... simply for entertainment purposes?

Leave your votes in the comments below or scream angrily at us on Twitter @EyeOnNFL.

Eye on Offense Award
Mike Freeman Ryan Wilson
Aaron Rodgers Aaron Rodgers, QB, Packers
He's undefeated and doing things at the quarterback position we've seen before but rarely. I know, I know. You're sick of Rodgers. Get used to him, though. He's going to be around these here award neighborhoods for some time as the Packers are likely to enter the nine and 10 win range and start entering the 1972 Miami Dolphins neighborhood.
Jay Cutler Jay Cutler, QB, Bears
He was 21 of 31 for 267 yards and tossed two touchdowns against a very good pass-rushing Vikings defense. Perhaps more amazing: Bears offensive coordinator Mike Martz left six, seven and sometimes eight players in to block, and, it turns out, Cutler is a pretty good quarterback when he's not getting blasted for 60 minutes (he was sacked just once).
Pete Prisco Will Brinson
Frank Gore Frank Gore, RB, 49ers
He ran for 141 yards and scored a touchdown in the team's upset of the Lions. What's truly impressive is that Gore averaged 9.4 per carry. That is special.
Ahmad BradshawAhmad Bradshaw, RB, Giants
The Giants fell apart against the Seahawks at home in Week 5, making Week 6's game against the Bills absolutely critical for them. Bradshaw was most critical to the win, running for 104 yards and three touchdowns in the Giants win.
Josh Katzowitz
Ahmad BradshawAhmad Bradshaw, RB, Giants
In a huge game for the Giants, Bradshaw, without Brandon Jacobs in the lineup, had a tremendous performance, rushing for 104 yards and three touchdowns. I imagine Eli Manning appreciated the contribution. 
Eye on Defense Award
Freeman Wilson
Darrelle RevisDarrelle Revis, CB, Jets
He did get beat a few times against Miami on Monday night but that 100-yard interception return was spectacular. Sure, he practically knocked Brandon Marshall on his butt in a great display of non-called pass interference, but Revis is getting those non-calls now.
Kurt Coleman Kurt Coleman, S, Eagles
Obviously, Rex Grossman shares this award because without him, Coleman's three interceptions wouldn't have been possible. In related news: nothing like a BAD REX unannounced visit to make Juan Castillo seem like he knows how to coordinate a defense.
Prisco Brinson
Kurt ColemanKurt Coleman, S, Eagles
He was benched a few weeks ago, but when inserted back into the lineup he made the most of it against the Redskins. Coleman had three picks of Rex Grossman in the game and had one of his best cover days. He was benched for his poor tackling.
Darrelle RevisDarrelle Revis, CB, Jets
I'd love to nominate Rex Grossman, but I'm not sure that's in the spirit of the awards. Instead, I'll give it to the guy who took a pick 100 yards to the house, giving the Jets a 7-3 lead when they should have been down 14-0. Revis showed why he's the best CB in the NFL today.
Katzowitz
Kurt Coleman Kurt Coleman, S, Eagles
Vindication for the Eagles safety. A few weeks after Coleman was benched, he reemerged as Rex Grossman’s biggest foil (well, second to Grossman himself), intercepting three passes and helping Philadelphia to perhaps a season-saving win. Chances are Coleman won’t be benched this week.
Eye on Special Teams Award
Freeman Wilson
Devin HesterDevin Hester, WR/KR, Bears
Why kick to him? Why, why, why? One more time: WHY? Kick the football out of bounds. Kick it into the stands. Kick it into the dirt. Anywhere except to him. He burned yet another team -- this time the Minnesota Vikings -- that stupidly kicked to him. And he'll keep doing that until teams finally get smart and stop doing it.
Devin Hester Devin Hester, WR/KR, Bears
I'll repeat what I wrote in Week 4, the last time Hester was our Special Teams Player of the Week. "We'll never understand why any team thinks kicking to Hester is a good idea." The Vikings did it, and Hester scored. Weird how that keeps happening.
Prisco Brinson
Devin HesterDevin Hester, WR/KR, Bears
Can it go to anyone but Hester? He ripped off a 98-yard kickoff return for a touchdown Sunday night against the Vikings. He also returned a punt 27 yards and almost broke that one.
Devin HesterDevin Hester, WR/KR/ Bears
As long as teams continue to kick to Hester, he's probably going to keep winning this award. Hester was the difference against the Panthers two weeks ago; against Minnesota he simply squashed any hope they had for their entire season with one magnificent burst of speed.
Katzowitz
Devin Hester Devin Hester, WR/KR, Bears
He’s made strides as a receiver this season, but as the Vikings -- who, for some strange reason, continued kicking to Hester -- can attest, he’s still awfully dangerous as a kick returner. Early in the third quarter, he returned a kick 98 yards for the touchdown nearly took back a punt as well. He is, as the Vikings know now, pretty good on special teams.
Eye on Coaching Award
Freeman Wilson
Bill BelichickJim Schwartz, HC, Lions
We went to the same high school. I think we played on the same football team together though I only sorta remember him. I was concussed a lot so bear with me. He's obviously a fiery guy and though his scamper after Harbaugh was unneeded most people would have wanted to punch Harbaugh in the mouth after that obnoxious post-game reaction.
Hue Jackson Jim Harbaugh, HC, 49ers
I think Harbaugh is a crazy-arms meltdown away from a tenured professorship at clown college, but the guy has the 49ers believing something not even Mike Singletary could convince them of: they're a good football team. Through six weeks, they're 5-1. Last year, they were 6-10.
Prisco Brinson
Raheem MorrisRaheem Morris, HC, Buccaneers
After his team's horrible trip to San Francisco that saw them get blown out 48-3, he got his team ready to play against the Saints and pulled off a 26-20 upset.  The Bucs were without running back LaGarrette Blount, so Morris turned the game over to Josh Freeman, who had a big game.
Mike MunchakJim Schwartz, HC, Lions
People are complaining about Schwartz' roll in Handshake-Gate (ugh), but here's the thing: Schwartz celebrates on his own sideline. Not at midfield. I'll hand him this award just based on the fact that 90 percent of America would have punched Jim Harbaugh Sunday. He didn't.
Katzowitz
Mike Zimmer Mike Zimmer, DC, Bengals
The Bengals DC continues to be one of those long-time assistant coaches who needs to be rewarded with a head coaching job. The Bengals have the No. 2 D in the NFL, and have allowed just one opponent to score more than 20 points. Cincy hasn’t played a Murderer’s Row of quarterbacks, but still, Zimmer’s unit has been impressive.
 

Posted on: October 17, 2011 4:00 pm
 

Kurt Coleman: 'I was able to read Rex all day'

Eagles safety Kurt Coleman had a bead on 'Skins QB Rex Grossman Sunday. (US PRESSWIRE)

Posted by Ryan Wilson

Through five games, the Eagles' defense was among the worst in the league (26th overall, 20th against the pass, 31st against the rush) and had shown an uncanny ability to miss tackles, no matter the ball-carrier or the level of difficulty.

Well, it only took an afternoon in FedEx Field to change all that. With Rex Grossman winging balls around the yard like a blindfolded drunk playing darts, Philadelphia's defense looked impressive and not like a group coached up by a former offensive assistant.

While there's still some discussion about Grossman keeping his job (we couldn't believe it either), Eagles safety Kurt Coleman, who was the beneficiary of three Grossman interceptions Sunday, explained that he had little trouble figuring out where Bad Rex was going with the ball.

"To be honest, I give all the credit to my teammates,” Coleman said during an appearance on Sirius XM NFL Radio (via the Sports Bog's Dan Steinberg). “They were able to get a lot of pressure on Rex. And for myself, I was able to read Rex all day. I had a great feeling for where he was going to all of his wide receivers. And when it came down to it, it was either me or the other guy making a play, and I wasn’t gonna let that other guy make the play.”

Did things change when Redskins coach Mike Shanahan pulled Grossman for John Beck?

“We definitely had to just stay with the same plan,” Coleman said. “And for myself, like I said, I was having a great time reading Rex. It’s almost like when you bring in a relief pitcher, it kind of takes a little bit of time to get used to him. Fortunately enough for us, we knew that they had to throw the ball. And if you can just limit the deep play, the big play, the time was in our favor.”

But before we condemn Grossman for, well, playing like we expected him to, he wants you to know that all the interceptions weren't his fault.

“Some of these, you’ve got to trust other people to make a cut to cross a safety’s face," he said during the post-game press conference. "I haven’t seen it on tape, I’m not saying [tight end] Fred [Davis] didn’t do that. But things are tight, and you have to make quick decisions, so I trusted that he was gonna be able to cross the safety’s face on his route. And I’m not sure what happened but he wasn’t able to, [and] the safety stepped up.”

And Davis, to his credit, took responsibility for the pick in question (for those keeping score, it was Grossman's third interception on the afternoon): “I feel like I DEFINITELY should have crossed that safety’s face," he said, via the Sports Bog. "That was one that was DEFINITELY my fault on that one.”

So through six weeks, the Redskins are 3-2 and second in the NFC East behind the Giants. It could we worse, right? It depends on who you ask. Take former Redskins great John Riggins, who wondered during Sunday's postgame show about Shanahan's quarterback plans.

“I gotta believe if I’m in that locker room, I’ve got to be really angry with Shanahan, because I’m going Rex is a nice guy, but this is what he does, coach. How come it took you so long to figure this out?he said.

Pretty sure Riggins isn't alone in that thinking.

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Posted on: October 16, 2011 3:34 pm
Edited on: October 16, 2011 3:40 pm
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Posted on: October 11, 2011 9:56 pm
 

Andy Reid won't back off the wide-nine scheme

Juan Castillo has struggled to get Philadelphia's defense playing well this year (US Presswire).Posted by Josh Katzowitz

It still boggles the mind that after firing defensive coordinator Sean McDermott after last season, Eagles coach Andy Reid moved offensive line coach Juan Castillo to McDermott’s old spot. And it’s been kind of fun to point out the inadequacy (so far) of that move, considering Philadelphia’s defense -- even with highly-regarded new acquisitions like Nnamdi Asomugha, Jason Babin and Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie -- has been underwhelming this year.

Try tied for 26th in the NFL with 26.4 points allowed per game.

But the Philadelphia Inquirer has an interesting theory why Castillo might have been Reid’s only choice: basically, it states that, since Reid was so intent on implementing a new wide-nine* defense, other defensive coordinator candidates who would have had to do Reid’s biding in playing with that defense might have balked at the idea and said no thanks.

*This is the scheme where the defensive ends are split out wide, on the outside of the opponent’s tight end, and their goal is to disrupt the pocket with speed rather than trying to move offensive tackles with strength or footwork.

“What probably happened as the Eagles defensive coordinator search turned farcical was that interviewed candidates balked at the idea of coming aboard with the stipulation that the wide nine would be used here -- take it or leave it,” writes Jeff McLane. “There aren't many coaches that use it, although it has been around in one form or other for many years.

So that left Juan Castillo. And, well, Castillo would do whatever Reid and (defensive line coach Jim) Washburn wanted. He was an offensive line coach wishing to become a defensive coordinator. Castillo would have agreed to the wide nineteen.”

As McLane suggests, Washburn might have been another obstacle. Reid hired the well-respected Washburn away from Tennessee specifically so he could help install the wide-nine. This was before Reid had even hired a defensive coordinator. Considering Washburn was on to stay no matter what, that also would have taken away from a new coordinator’s autonomy in hiring the coaches he wanted.

While Babin and defensive end Trent Cole have performed well split out wide, the linebackers have done a poor job of tackling, leading to the benching of Casey Matthews and safety Kurt Coleman. But the real problem, the newspaper writes, is that Reid has not given Castillo the appropriate parts to play successfully with the wide-nine.

Yet, Reid told reporters this week that he’s sticking with the wide-nine, because he’s saying that it worked. For proof, he points to the second half of last Sunday’s Buffalo game when the Bills were held to a field goal for the rest of the game after starting the second half with an 80-yard touchdown drive.

"You obviously saw it work in the second half very effectively," Reid said. "We've just got to continue to work with it. Listen, anything new you've got to work with and work out the wrinkles and get it right."

"Players, they have to learn it, coaches have to learn it, particularly the new coaches. So it's a joint effort there."

Yes, but if the Eagles don’t improve -- they are, after all, a stunning 1-4 -- it might not be Reid’s call after this season. Because Reid is not 100 percent certain to survive if Philadelphia’s wide-nine doesn’t start producing better results relatively soon.

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Posted on: March 28, 2011 3:15 pm
 

Offseason Checkup: Philadelphia Eagles

Posted by Andy Benoit



Eye on Football's playing doctor for every NFL team with our Offseason Check-ups. Also, check out our checkup podcast:





Michael Vick wrote one of the greatest bounce back stories in the history of professional sports, giving the Eagles not just football’s fastest offense, but also its most entertaining.

Turns out, the 30-year-old Vick is a pied piper to young guns Jeremy Maclin, DeSean Jackson, Brent Celek and LeSean McCoy (all of whom took a collective step forward in 2010).

Philly’s magic began to dissipate once teams realized that this defense was not far above average and that this offense could not read complex blitzes prior to the snap.




An improved front five could put the Eagles over the top in 2011. Offensive line coach Juan Castillo has moved to the defensive coordinator role (not a typo…the offensive line coach is now the defensive coordinator).

Filling Castillo’s old spot is longtime Colts assistant Howard Mudd, whom many believe is the best line coach in the industry. Mudd will simplify everything Philly’s offensive linemen do.

Whereas before they had a handful of different pass protection methods to learn, they’ll now have just one. Expect to see major improvements right away. Mudd was a big reason the Colts were able to survive with low-drafted and undrafted blockers for so many years.




1. Outside Linebacker
Ernie Sims is a great athlete who has no idea what he’s doing half the time. Opposing offenses love spotting him in coverage. Moise Fokou has good downhill attack speed, but he’s a fringe starter at best.

2. Safety
It would be wise to re-sign veteran leader Quintin Mikell. But if that doesn’t happen, the Eagles will likely need a more consistent replacement strong safety than Kurt Coleman. Also, keep in mind, free safety Nate Allen tore his ACL in December.

3. Cronerback
Everyone thinks Nnamdi Asomugha would be a great fit on this team. Asomugha, however, is a man-to-man specialist. Castillo will run a zone-based scheme. The Eagles would be wise to spend the money elsewhere. And while upgrades would be nice, the Eagles don’t necessarily have to spend at this spot to begin with. As much as Dmitri Patterson struggled down the stretch, the first-time starter also looked very good at times, playing with aggression and confidence early on.




There is a lot of pressure on Michael Vick in 2011. He is being asked to lead a team that many expect to contend for a title. If he answers the challenge, he’ll almost certainly be signed to a long-term mega contract that could make most of the financial woes left over from his dogfighting retribution disappear.

If he fails, he’ll still get a big contract somewhere, but the mega contract will never come. Assuming Philly’s defense is fine (and granted, that’s not a light assumption), Vick’s performance will determine this team’s fate.

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Posted on: December 1, 2010 9:32 pm
 

Urlacher calls NFL fines 'bull' and 'outrageous'

Posted by Will Brinson

It's no secret that the NFL's decision to fine players for big hits (and fine them large chunks of cheddar) hasn't been favorably received by the league's players -- particularly the defensive ones.

Add Bears star Brian Urlacher, appearing on ESPN Radio Wednesday, to the list of people complaining, as he lamented the expensive nature of fines handed to players, particularly those with lower salaries.

"I think the money’s outrageous," Urlacher said, via Michael David Smith at Pro Football Talk. "Why can’t there be different levels of fines? A league minimum guy getting fined 50 grand? That’s a lot of money for him. Making 300 grand a year getting almost a fifth of his paycheck gone? I can go on all day about this because it frustrates me when I see these hits and these guys getting fined."

Urlacher did say that the league's decision to issue fines "hasn't changed" what he or the Bears defense do on the field. He also called the process by which the fines were determined "bull" (although he admitted to not knowing exactly how they were determined), and said he thinks there should be "a panel of guys who look at those hits and go over them."

The panel notion isn't exactly a horrible idea -- but more interesting is the idea of fining guys based on how much money they make. Andy touched on this over a month ago (accurate calling the system for fines "outrageously unfair") and it's something that seems like a pretty obvious solution.

If someone makes $300,000 gets fined $50,000, they're having their livelihood significantly damaged; maybe that means that guys who make less money are less inclined to lead with their helmets, but it also gives more leeway for guys with bigger paychecks to avoid changing their style of play.

And while the league has shown some leniency towards players with lesser salaries and better intentions (Kurt Coleman, who makes very little money, wasn't fined for his monster hit on Austin Collie) it simply remains unfair that someone could lose one-sixth of what they make annually on a single play that they're not guaranteed to have any control over.

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Posted on: November 8, 2010 4:24 pm
 

Collins fined $50K, Kurt Coleman not fined

Posted by Will Brinson

The two biggest hits from Sunday, in terms of helmet-to-helmet action, were Kurt Coleman's hit on Austin Collie -- a very controversial shot that ended with Collie being taken off the field in a stretcher -- and Nick Collins' hit on Roy Williams, which prompted pretty much everyone watching to assume that a fine and/or suspension was headed his way.

The fines are now in on those, and Collins has been handed a $50,000 fine, according to Jason LaCanfora, while Coleman has been assessed no fine for his hit on Collie.

Both of these fines (or lack thereof, if you prefer) make sense -- Collins' hit was a straight head-hunting shot a la Brandon Meriweather's hit on Todd Heap and is exactly what the league wants to put a stop to.

Coleman's hit, while technically "against the rules," lacked any real malicious intent and was very difficult to avoid. Therefor it seems that the 15-yard penalty assessed on the field was sufficient punishment.

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Posted on: November 7, 2010 9:52 pm
 

Collie's hit scared colleagues

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

The concussion suffered by Colts WR Austin Collie was a better diagnosis than one could have expected. Especially if you watched Collie’s crash with Eagles DBs Kurt Coleman and Quintin Mikell and saw him fall to the turf and not move.

But that doesn’t mean the injury didn’t scare the daylights out of his teammates and coaches. Because it did.

 "I won't go into all the details about it, but he took a pretty good hit," coach Jim Caldwell told reporters after the Colts lost 26-24 to the Eagles. "He was out, unconscious for a period of time."

Said QB Peyton Manning: "Coach Caldwell told us early it was a concussion and you don't like to hear that. It's better than what everybody fears at that point."

For the record, Caldwell said he thought the officials made the proper call, throwing the penalty flag for a helmet-to-helmet hit. Now, we wait for Collie to return to health and for the potential fines and suspensions to be doled out.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com