Tag:Marcedes Lewis
Posted on: December 17, 2011 8:15 pm
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Dunta Robinson on Jaguars WRs: '[bleep]ing jokes'

By Will Brinson

During Thursday's 41-14 loss, like much of the 2011 season, the Jaguars struggled to move the ball against the Falcons because Blaine Gabbert couldn't get the ball down the field. Part of that is Gabbert, but a bigger part of that might be a lack of wide receiver options available to Gabbert on Jacksonville's roster.

Falcons cornerback Dunta Robinson would lean towards the latter and, in fact, he thinks that the current Jags receivers are "[bleep]ing jokes."

"Those guys are [bleep]ing jokes," Robinson said per Vito Stellino of The Florida Times-Union. "Those guys couldn’t get a [bleep]ing receiver if it hit them in the head."

Ouch. Robinson added that the Jaguars "haven't had anyone decent since Jimmy Smith."

That part is actually true -- the Jags leading pass-catchers since Smith retired in 2005 are Matt Jones (2006, 643 yards; 2008, 761 yards), Reggie Williams (2007, 629 yards), Mike Sims-Walker (2009, 869 yards), Mike Thomas (2010, 820 yards) and Marcedes Lewis (2011, 415 yards).

If you're looking for a description of "a motley crew," this is pretty much it, and that doesn't even take into consideration that a) Lewis is a tight end and b) Jones and Williams were monumentally busty first-round picks, one of whom is retired and one of whom is politely referred to as "currently a free agent."

So, yes, the Jaguars desperately need a talented wide receiver. But given the other problems they have on their roster, it seems more likely that they'll pursue on in free agency -- Vincent Jackson, DeSean Jackson and Dwayne Bowe will all be unrestricted this year -- instead of reaching for one in the first round.

Maybe then Dunta Robinson will be happy.

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Posted on: August 13, 2011 11:10 pm
Edited on: August 14, 2011 2:17 am
 

How 2011's rookies fared during the first week

Posted by Will Brinson



Rookies are at a disadvantage during the 2011 season, because of the shortened amount of time they were given to prep for the season due to the lockout. As such, they're likely to struggle substantially early.

But not every rookie will struggle.

For instance, in the Falcons preseason opener on Friday, Julio Jones flashed enough explosiveness to warrant Mike Smith describing him as "outstanding" after Atlanta loss against the Dolphins.

Had the first teams stayed in, we likely would have gotten more glimpses of the reason Thomas Dimitroff traded up 21 spots to nab the Alabama product -- he turned a pair of short grabs into 43 yards quickly and a reverse for 12 yards looked like it could have easily gone for more.

Atlanta believes the reason the missed a shot at the Super Bowl in 2010 was their lack of big playmaking. And correctly so. Jones appears -- in an admittedly small sample size -- to be very nice remedy for that problem.

Things didn't go quite as swimmingly for Bengals rookie quarterback Andy Dalton, who managed to post somewhat decent stats -- 11/15, 69 yards and an interception. But don't listen to me on that.

Offensive coordinator Jay Gruden's description (he said Dalton's start "wasn't a total debacle") probably summed it up best.

Dalton struggled mightily, and not just because Gruden put him in tough spots by trying to take shots downfield with Ndamukong Suh breathing down his neck (he did). Of course, it didn't help that Suh popped his helmet off and chunked him to the ground late in the first quarter either. That's enough to make a man quit his job for good, especially on the first day.
NFL Preseason Week 1

Dalton doesn't have the arm strength or athleticism to just step in and overcome inexperience. Even some of his completions -- including a quick out to Jerome Simpson from the shotgun set -- were off and didn't do his receivers any favors.

Speaking of his receivers, A.J. Green looks like the real deal, insomuch as one could determine that from the shorter passes he caught from Dalton. Not to sound weird, but I'd be cool with just watching him run and jump all day. (That's weird, isn't it? Crap.)

Point is, Green's athletic as hell and all the hype about him before the season might not be that overblown.

Also not overblown? Cam Newton's athleticism. Whooooo-boy. But Newton's a good-news/bad-news situation. See, his athleticism is unquestioned. He's a freak. A totally different package of size, strength and speed than we've ever seen in the NFL. But as expected he isn't precisely polished. That's the bad news.

The good news is that Newton has clearly progressed from where he was when we last saw him (read: the combine). If Newton can make strides like that without serious hand-on guidance from the coaching staff, I'm willing to bet he can eventually become a great quarterback. He's got a cannon for an arm, but his touch was clearly off on some throws.

That may not matter for Carolina, though, as even though Jimmy Clausen played pretty darn well after throwing a pick six on his second throw, there could be riots in Charlotte if Newton doesn't start right away simply because he oozes potential.

Blaine Gabbert also oozed enough of something for the Jaguars to trade up for him. Could it have been composure, perhaps?

"I thought [Gabbert] was composed and did a good job making decisions," Jaguars coach Jack Del Rio said following Saturday's blowout loss to New England. "He looked like he belonged. It was a good beginning."

Gabbert finished 9/16 for 85 yards with no touchdowns (but no picks) and got hosed by a number of drops from his wide receivers. That being said, he looked like most of the other rookies we saw, in that he struggled at times to step up and complete passes in the pocket.

Gabbert definitely showed some flashes that should give the Jaguars optimism for his future, but if you go back and watch the game (or, if you prefer, just scan the play-by-play), you won't many combinations of the words "complete" and "deep." The Jaguars kept things short, as one might expect, particularly given the dearth of weapons available to the rookie on Thursday.

Speaking of that Patriots-Jaguars game, um, Ryan Mallett's really good. OK, "really good" might be a stretch but how about good? Or good? One of those should work well enough to emphasize how he might be the most pro-ready quarterback in this rookie class.

Mallett's got poise in the pocket, doesn't seem scared of pressure, knows when to run, has a big arm and confident in moving through his progression. Plus -- and this might have to do with his familiarity in a pro-style system -- you do just don't see him float throws like other rookie quarterbacks.

I mean, yeah, it doesn't hurt that he's being mentored by Tom Brady and Bill Belichick, and, yeah, we're not like five years away from watching the hoodie stroll the sidelines with a crooked cane while Mallett and a gorgeous mane of hair takes down a Super Bowl win, but -- surprise, surprise -- New England might have found a steal in the draft with their third-round nab of Mallett.

It's definitely too early to call Titans rookie Jake Locker a "steal" (and, I'd argue, he was taken too meet such qualifications, barring an absolute blowup), but he looked particularly comfortable in going 7/10 for 89 yards and a teeter while running the Titans offense on Saturday night.

The play that clearly stood out? Locker fumbling the snap on the first play after Tennessee's defense forced a turnover, recovering his own fumble, rolling out right, setting his feet and chucking a 45-yard bomb Yamon Figurs for his first professional touchdown.

For whatever reason, Locker seemed to fit the bill for "prepared" in a completely different way than Mallett. Thrust into a difficult situation with no real weapons -- paging Chris Johnson! -- and pressure as the not-too-far-off future of the franchise, Locker seemed to manage the game in a hyperactive, scrappy kind of way.

That's not to say that he's the NFL's David Eckstein or anything, obviously. And maybe it's just that the Titans know what to do with him. (Credit to Doug Farrar over at Shutdown Corner if this happens -- he's been driving the Locker bandwagon, based on his situation, for a while now.) Obviously they didn't plan to have him fumble, recover and scramble, but you could see that when Locker rolled out he could sling darts.

Christian Ponder's first career completion in the NFL was also a rollout. The rookie out of Florida State hit fellow rook Kyle Rudolph for a 10-yard gain, but that might have been the highlight for Ponder. He never really had the poise that we expected from the most "ready" (theoretically) quarterback in the first round, and at times he looked a bit lost and/or overwhelmed especially at first and, surprisingly, seemed to have his most success when on the move, outside of the pocket.

One of those on-the-move plays should have resulted in a first down on a 3rd-and-16, but was called back for a personal foul penalty. The interesting thing is that Ponder managed to avoid a sack, buy time and made a crucial throw on the move; yes, it was pretty surprising given what we expected from him.

It was also surprising considering Ponder faced off against the third-string defense.

On the bright side: it's just one game. And it's early. That's the beauty of preseason.

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Posted on: July 18, 2011 12:53 pm
Edited on: July 18, 2011 5:32 pm
 

GM Smith: Re-signing current Jags '1st priority'

Posted by Will Brinson

The Jacksonville Jaguars are an interesting team to watch as we emerge from the lockout cocoon and head (hopefully) to the 2011 season. They've got a rookie quarterback who might or might not play and a head coach who might or might not be on the hot seat.

In other words, the future, and measuring short- versus long-term goals is kind of up the air. So it'll be interesting to see how they handle free agency. According GM Gene Smith, getting their "own players" will take precedent. “Our own players will always be our first priority,” Smith said, per Tania Ganguli of the Florida Times-Union. “I’ve said this before that it is our objective to get a long-term deal done with Marcedes.”

Obviously, Smith's referring to tight end Marcedes Lewis, who was franchise tagged near the end of February. Less obvious is how the situation with Lewis will play out -- there's been some chatter that Lewis will hold out, based on his decision to remain in Los Angeles "until [his] deal is done."

He's also commented that he just wants "to be treated fair."

“All I can do is be optimistic about it,” Lewis told Ganguli in a recent phone interview. “I think both sides have an idea of where we want to go. I’m just going to continue to handle my side and let them take care of that. I’m hoping we can get it done and get me in camp.”

Lewis' situation is fascinating because the Jaguars have already gotten rid of one-time breakout wide receiver Mike Sims-Walker and are left with Mike Thomas shoring up their No. 1 receiver spot.

Making Lewis happy and getting him into camp on time is something that appears absolutely essential for Smith if he wants to ensure that the Jaguars have enough offensive potency to keep with the rest of the AFC South, especially if they're not planning on trolling for free agents between now and the start of the season.

After all, if David Garrard doesn't have any weapons, the Jags might struggle early and Blaine Gabbert might find himself under center sooner than anyone expects. Not having a safety net at tight end for their rookie is probably something the Jacksonville front office would like to avoid.

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Posted on: April 14, 2011 2:00 pm
 

Marcedes Lewis might hold out

Posted by Andy BenoitM. Lewis

The NFL lockout has distracted everyone from potential player holdout stories. But rest assured, once business resumes, there will be some players -- perhaps more than usual, depending on the league rules established for 2011 -- refraining from team activities in an effort to leverage a more lucrative deal.

One of these players could be Jaguars tight end Marcedes Lewis. The sixth-year veteran had a career year in 2010 and got slapped with the franchise tag in February.

Asked by Tania Ganguli of the Jacksonville.com when he’ll return to Jacksonville, Lewis replied (via text), "I'll be training in LA til my deal is done.”

Ganguli asked if that meant he'd skip training camp if he didn't have a long-term deal.

"It's not in me to do that..guess time will tell," Lewis said.

Lewis’ one-year franchise tender is worth $7.3 million.

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Posted on: April 5, 2011 3:21 pm
Edited on: April 5, 2011 7:36 pm
 

Offseason Checkup: Jacksonville Jaguars

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

 

Eye on Football's playing doctor for every NFL team with our Offseason Check-ups



On Dec. 12, 2010, the Jaguars were 8-5, and they were just beginning the week of practices that led to a showdown with the Colts that basically was for the AFC South title, a crown Jacksonville never has won. Indianapolis showed up that night and won by 10 points, and the Jaguars never recovered, losing their final three games and missing the playoffs for the third-straight season.

It was a huge disappointment, and you have to wonder about the future of this organization with this coaching staff in place. That is the No. 1 question facing this franchise heading into next year.




1. Avoid late-season slumps
Do you put this on Del Rio? Do you put this on Jacksonville being a bad cold-weather team? Do you put this on late-season injuries to Garrard and Jones-Drew in 2010? It’s hard to know. But after starting 7-5 in 2009 and 8-5 in 2010, the team went on to lose four games and three games, respectively, to end those years on the sourest of notes. We don’t know the answers to the above questions, but somebody might want to figure it out.

2. Defensive everywhere but DT
Though their 2010 first-round pick of DT Tyson Alualu was deemed a little bizarre at the time, the rookie from California had a pretty good year. He should continue to be an anchor in the middle of the defensive line. Now, just about every other position in Jacksonville’s defense needs to be upgraded. Perhaps most important are the defensive ends, who can help lessen the time the Jaguars unremarkable secondary must cover opposing WRs. Former first round pick Derrick Harvey has been a disaster, Jeremy Mincey is barely passable as a starter and Aaron Kampman has had a couple major knee injuries.

3.Quality Wide Recievers
Is Mike Thomas truly a No. 1 guy? He had a nice season last year (66 catches, 820 yards, four TDs) as a second-year player, but how will he fare without Mike Sims-Walker – who simply wasn’t the consistent playmaker the Jaguars needed? That’s a major question for Thomas and WR Jason Hill. If they can’t produce, Jacksonville still has young receivers in Tiquan Underwood and Jarrett Dillard. Jacksonville could feel the need to upgrade this position before next year, but if not, it’s still a talented, albeit mostly unproven, corps at this point.




It seems like nobody can really tell if QB David Garrard is worth keeping around, though he actually played pretty good football last season. Meanwhile, there’s no question Jacksonville will hang on tightly to RB Maurice Jones-Drew, who recorded 1,324 yards in 14 games last season and surpassed Tennessee’s Chris Johnson as the AFC South’s best back (his backup, Rashad Jennings, also is quality), and TE Marcedes Lewis proved himself a valuable commodity.

The offense most likely will continue to play conservatively – in part, because of the strength of Jones-Drew and to mask some of Garrard’s inadequacies – but the real test will be the defense. For Jacksonville, it’s the playoffs or bust, and most likely, we won’t know how good this team – or how safe Del Rio – really is until Week 13-17.

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Posted on: February 23, 2011 4:32 pm
 

Jaguars place franchise tag on TE Marcedes Lewis

Posted by Will Brinson

The Jaguars placed the franchise tag on tight end Marcedes Lewis, the team announced Wednesday.

Lewis and the Jaguars have been in discussions about a long-term deal, and it was expected, as we noted earlier, that they would tag him, if only to give the talks an extension.

Lewis previously referred to the tag as a "Catch-22" and a "sticky situation," but the fact of the matter is he'll be hard-pressed not to accept the $7 million-plus that the one-year tender gives him.

[Related: Franchise Tag Tracker]

Of course, it may not be necessary -- if the two sides can reach a deal before the CBA expires on March 4, Lewis could end up with a substantially larger pay day.

Lewis, who racked up career highs of 700 yards along with 10 touchdowns and 58 catches, now only faces the questions of 1) how long he'll be in Jacksonville and 2) whether or not he can repeat the success he had in 2010.

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Posted on: December 17, 2010 9:21 am
 

Key Matchup Week 15: Jaguars O vs. Colts D

Posted by Andy Benoit

Back in the summer, who would have ever imagined that the Jaguars-Colts Week 15 matchup would essentially be for the AFC South title? The Jaguars have overachieved in 2010 and the Colts have been stricken with injuries. At this critical juncture, both teams still control their own destiny.

The Colts defense, no matter who it puts on the field, will be fast. Colts president Bill Polian has a specific mold of player he looks for when drafting, and that mold begins and ends with speed. (In between is character, versatility within a position and football IQ.) Indy’s D excels on the fast Lucas Oil Field surface.

The Jaguars obviously want to pound the ball with Maurice Jones-Drew. The 5’7” boD. Garrard (US Presswire)wling ball comes into the game having rushed for over 100 yards in six straight contests. And everyone knows that the way to attack the Colts front seven is to run right at it (especially if the Colts can’t rely on strong safety Bob Sanders flying into the box).

But this is still the NFL; at some point, the Jaguars will have to throw. The concern is, they’ll be relying on David Garrard. The ninth-year veteran has a sterling 93.2 quarterback rating this season (20 touchdowns, 12 interceptions), but that is largely a product of orchestrating a conservative passing attack.

Jacksonville’s passing attack is conservative by necessity, not choice. Offensive coordinator Dirk Koetter is a creative pass-first coach who has had to reshape his persona. Reason being, Garrard is a good scrambler, but he’s not necessarily lethal outside the pocket. He has a mediocre arm that prevents him from making great improvisational plays. Because Garrard lacks ideal instincts, Koetter is forced to call a lot of plays that are similar to what he might call with a first-or second-year quarterback.

Much of Jacksonville’s pass game is predicated on play action. This is partly a function of the Jags being a run-first team, but it’s more a function of Koetter feeling obligated to simplify Garrard’s reads. The very nature of play-action and rollout passes cut the field in half and define the read for a quarterback. If the quarterback’s first look isn’t there, there’s usually a second look and then an option to run. With a star pocket passer, there’d be a second look, followed by a third and fourth look. That’s why, at the end of the day, pocket passers put more pressure on a defense.

Indy’s defensive speed can make it difficult to run play action. Yes, the faster Colts could take themselves further out of position by biting on a Garrard fake. But they can also get back in position much quicker. And because Jacksonville receivers Mike Sims-Walker and Mike Thomas don’t necessarily have dynamic raw playmaking abilities, many of Jacksonville’s big plays are slow developing (drag routes, comeback routes, etc.) Slow developing plays against a speedy defense? Not ideal.

What’s more, the Jaguars will likely need to keep an extra tight end in to block, as right tackle Jordan Black has little to no chance at containing Colts defensive end Robert Mathis one-on-one. That means one less tight end for Garrard to lean on. In the past, when the Jags offensive line has struggled, Koetter has sacrificed tight end Marcedes Lewis. But Lewis has become too valuable as a receiver to leave in as a blocker.
In short, we’re talking about a Jaguars passing offense that will simply be one step behind the Colts passing defense. Thus, if it’s even possible, the Jags will have to rely on Jones-Drew and Rashad Jennings even more than usual.

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Posted on: December 13, 2010 4:34 pm
 

Hot Routes 12.13.10 box score tidbits Week 14

Hot Routes

Posted by Andy Benoit

Ryan Torain ripped off 172 yards against a Bucs front seven that had major problems getting off blocks early on.

Thanks to a 64-yard reception, Bucs rookie wideout Arrelious Benn had his first 100-yard game as a pro (122, to be exact). In fact, Benn’s previous high was 53 yards.

The Browns ran nine plays on their opening field goal drive against the Bills but just 37 plays the rest of the game.

The Packers were 2/12 on third down and 0/1 in the red zone at Detroit.

Though no player had more than 51 yards rushing for Detroit, the Lions still racked up 190 yards on the ground.

Hines Ward had his best outing since Week 7, catching eight passes for 115 yards against Cincinnati.

In addition to an interception returned for a touchdown, LaMarr Woodley had two sacks and two tackles for a loss.

Michael Turner rushed for over 100 yards for the third time in four weeks. The Falcons running back is getting stronger as the season wears on.

Kroy Biermann and John Abraham both had two sacks against the Panthers.

The Raiders and Jaguars combined for 387 yards rushing. Three players – Darren McFadden, Maurice Jones-Drew and Rashad Jennings – went over the century mark.

Jaguars tight end Marcedes Lewis had four catches for an important 57 yards. He also scored his career-high ninth touchdown.

The Rams were just 1/4 in the red zone against the Saints. (Unless you count Sam Bradford’s pick-six to Malcom Jenkins as a score.)

Pretty simple what happened in San Francisco: Niners zero turnovers, Seahawks five.

Brian Westbrook had 87 yards on six receptions.

The Patriots recorded 27 first downs at Chicago.

Perhaps the only Bears defender who played well was Brian Urlacher. He had 11 tackles (three for a loss), a sack and three pass breakups.

Chad Henne’s 5/18 performance was the lowest completion percentage that a winning Dolphins quarterback has had since 1980.

Dolphins punter Brandon Fields had 10 punts for 564 yards.

More special teams notes: Cardinals kicker Jay Feely was 5/6 on field goals.

Part of the reason the Cardinals-Broncos game took forever to end: Kyle Orton 19/41; John Skelton 15/37.

The Chargers had 25 first downs, which was 20 more than the Chiefs had.

Brodie Croyle probably isn’t the answer: Kansas City finished the game with 19 total yards passing.

Antoine Cason took over as the punt returner for San Diego. He averaged 15.2 yards per return with a long of 42.

The Eagles held Miles Austin and Roy Williams to a combined four catches for 45 yards.


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