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Tag:Mark Anderson
Posted on: February 27, 2012 1:08 pm
 

2012 NFL Free Agency: Defensive End Rankings

It sounds like Houston isn't remotely interested in letting Williams test free agency. (US Presswire)
By Josh Katzowitz

Leading up to the start of free agency on March 13, we're compiling the best 2012 NFL free agents by position. These are the defensive ends.

Most of the categories in our 2012 free agent rankings are fairly straightforward. Running backs are running backs. Tight ends are tight ends. Quarterbacks are quarterbacks. But when it comes to the defensive line, the category gets a little blurry.

Some defensive ends also play defensive tackle. Defensive ends in a 3-4 scheme oftentimes line up as an outside linebacker. That makes ranking them in a single list a bit more complicated. Though some of the following players won’t always line up as a defensive end, the idea that each of these players will be asked to rush the passer remains the same. So, we list them as defensive ends.

1. Mario Williams

Breakdown: Williams quickly caught on to Wade Phillips’ 3-4 scheme where he played as more of an end/linebacker hybrid and recorded five sacks in the only five games in which he participated last year. Williams likely will return to terrorizing tackles and quarterbacks on nearly every snap if he leaves Houston and signs with a team that uses the 4-3. True, Williams is coming off a pectoral muscle injury that sent him to the IR list, but he says he’s healthy and the former No. 1 overall pick is going to be expensive. That said, Texans general manager Rick Smith continues to say that re-signing Williams is one of the teams’ top offseason priorities, though there’s a real question whether Houston has the cap room to do so. Even though Williams has failed to reach double-digits in sacks for the past three years, he still could win the richest defensive player contract of all time if he leaves Houston.

Possible Landing Spots:Texans, Jaguars, Seahawks, Titans
Avril made a name for himself in 2011. (Getty Images)

2. Cliff Avril


Breakdown: Although he’s not as well-known as teammates Ndamukong Suh or (probably) Nick Fairley, Avril emerged as one of the nastiest ends in the league this year. His 11 sacks were a career high, and he even managed his first career interception. The problem on Avril’s end is that there’s almost no chance Detroit will let him get anywhere near free agency. The Lions and Avril are working on a long-term deal. General manager Martin Mayhew said that while he doesn’t want to franchise-tag Avril, he’s also not willing to lose him. If that occurs, Avril -- who has hinted at holding out -- will have to decide if he wants to be on time for training camp.

Possible Landing Spots: Lions

3. Calais Campbell


Breakdowns: The past three seasons, Campbell has been consistent, and he has consistently improved, increasing his tackle totals every season and notching a career-high eight sacks in 2011 for the Cardinals. But like Avril, he’s got very little chance to test himself on the free agent market, because it sounds like if Arizona can’t come to terms on a long-term contract, the Cardinals will tag him. But unlike Avril, Campbell said he’s OK with that scenario. Besides, if he is tagged and makes close to $11 million for 2012 and puts forth another career-best performance, he’ll have the chance to set himself up with a huge contract.
 
Possible Landing Spots: Cardinals

4. Robert Mathis


Breakdown: Since he’s spent his entire nine-year career in Indianapolis, it’s hard to imagine Mathis in a non-Colts uniform -- almost as tough, I suppose, as imagining Peyton Manning in something other than blue and white. The potential problem, though, is new coach Chuck Pagano seems intent on installing the 3-4 scheme, and that will be a transition for somebody who’s always been a 4-3 end (it’s worth noting that CBSSports.com’s Pete Prisco doesn’t seem concerned with the Colts turning Mathis into a pass-rushing linebacker). The Colts have said they want to keep Mathis in Indianapolis, but Dwight Freeney will cost $19 million against the salary cap. Another possibility for Mathis is the Colts placing the franchise tag on him, but considering Mathis is 31, the delaying of a long-term contract isn’t necessarily a great option for him.

Possible Landing Spots: Titans, Falcons, Colts

5. John Abraham

Abraham believes he's worth $12 million a year, even though he'll turn 34 before next season. (US Presswire)

Breakdown: Although Abraham will turn 34 before the start of the 2012 season, he still should draw plenty of interest throughout the league, simply because he continues to be one of the elite ends around. He’s durable, playing at least 15 games per season in the last five years, and he continues to churn out double-digit sack totals on a near-annual basis (his 9.5 sacks in 2011 just missed the cutoff). Can he command a long-term contract? Probably not, because of his age. Is he still a top-10 defensive end? Probably, yes. But is he worth $12 million? According to Abraham, the answer is: absolutely. “Check out the five top ends,” Abraham told the Atlanta Journal Constitution. “Everybody is getting 12-plus. I made $8 million last year. Everybody is saying, ‘Oh, he’s so greedy.’ How am I greedy when I’m just trying to get paid the same thing they are getting paid?” The chances of Abraham getting $12 million? Slim to none.

Possible Landing Spots: Giants, Buccaneers, Patriots

6. Cory Redding

Breakdown: He had a rough year in 2009 in his only season with the Lions, but since moving to Baltimore and playing with the Ravens for the past two seasons, Redding has returned to being a solid end who can stop the run and who occasionally can muster a sack (he’s got 7.5  combined in the past two seasons). But Redding will turn 32 next season, and he had injuries at the end of last year that slowed him a bit (even though it was one of the best seasons of his career). He’s probably not a great long-term value for most teams in the league, but the Ravens are a fan of him, particularly since he took on a leadership role when linebacker Ray Lewis missed four games. Redding just seems to fit in well with Baltimore’s defense. But remember, Pagano lurks to the west in Indianapolis.

Possible Landing Spots:Colts, Ravens

7. Jeremy Mincey


Breakdown: Mincey certainly picked the best time to have a career year. In his contract year, he recorded 57 tackles, eight sacks and an interception. Considering he didn’t combine for those numbers during the first five seasons of his career, that should tell you about Mincey’s mindset entering 2011. Or, it should tell you that last season was simply an anomaly (or, I suppose, you could say that it just took Mincey a long time to develop). Either way, Mincey is looking to get paid -- he’s on record saying he won’t give Jacksonville a hometown discount -- and though it appears the Jaguars would like to keep him, they’ll have to figure out where he fits in with the team’s finances (it should be noted that Jacksonville has plenty of room under the salary cap).

Possible Landing Spots: Jaguars, Bills

8. Israel Idonije


Breakdown: He obviously doesn’t get the love that’s reserved for teammate Julius Peppers, but Idonije notched a career-high 52 tackles last season (along with five sacks). Even better for Chicago, Idonije seems intent on returning to the Bears. “I want to be here,” Idonije said earlier this month. “I have an incredible relationship with the coaching staff, and I understand the system. So my No. 1 focus is to stay.” He even intimated he would give Chicago a hometown discount. He probably won’t command an expensive long-term deal, and he’ll probably be worth it for the Bears.

Possible Landing Spots: Bears

9.  Mark Anderson


Breakdown: Anderson is a strange case, because as ESPN Boston pointed out, he only played 47.6 percent of the Patriots snaps last year. Yet, he still managed 10 sacks. Also, he played all but one snap in the team’s final two games after Andre Carter suffered a quad injury.  Carter also is an unrestricted free agent, but reportedly, Anderson is a better bet to be re-signed by New England.

Possible Landing Spot: Patriots, Dolphins

10. Honorable Mentions


Unrestricted: Kendall Langford, Raheem Brock, Red Bryant, Andre Carter

Restricted: Phillip Merling, Michael Bennett

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Posted on: January 11, 2012 2:40 pm
Edited on: January 11, 2012 9:40 pm
 

Film Room: Patriots vs Broncos divisional preview

Will Gronk get his Gronk on this time around? (Getty Images)
Posted by Eye on Football Analyst Andy Benoit

It was assumed the Patriots would draw a rematch in their divisional round playoff opener. However, most figured that rematch would be of their Week 8 bout with Pittsburgh, not their Week 15 bout with Denver.

Here’s the breakdown of what could turn out to be the highest-rated divisional round Saturday night game of all-time.


1. New England’s plan for Tebow
Something to keep in mind is the Steelers had a sound gameplan last week, playing man coverage and using a tepid pass-rush to ensure that Tim Tebow stayed in the pocket. What the Steelers didn’t count on was Demaryius Thomas being able to get by Ike Taylor and Tebow being able to pull the trigger on downfield throws. Those two young ’10 first-rounders both had career days.

The Patriots might bet that the two youngsters can’t do it again.

On the one hand, that’s a smart bet given that Thomas and Tebow were inconsistent all season (Tebow especially). On the other hand, it’s foolish given that cornerback Kyle Arrington – who would draw the Thomas matchup, as Thomas almost always lines up on the favorable side of the left-handed Tebow – is not half the cover artist Ike Taylor is, and given that logic says if Tebow can win against the man coverage of the league’s best pass defense, he can surely win against the man coverage of the league’s worst pass defense.

In the last meeting, the Patriots played predominant Cover 3 in the first half:

The Broncos had success throwing skinny posts to Tebow’s left against the Patriots Cover 3 defense in the last meeting. Cover 3 is what you’d guess it is: three defensive backs each responsible for a third of the field. Because there is so much field to cover, the outside defensive backs often play man-to-man concepts (as Devin McCourty is doing on the right side). Cover 3 is something defenses play when they blitz or when they want to force a quarterback to throw (it’s the default zone coverage behind an eight-defender box).

In this example, the Patriots were clearly baiting Tebow to throw. Notice there are only five rushers (which is hardly a blitz considering Denver has seven guys in pass protection – the idea was to keep Tebow from scrambling). Also notice how linebacker Dane Fletcher has his back to the quarterback and is running towards the left passing window. (Fletcher was late getting there; Tebow did a good job recognizing the coverage and getting the ball out quickly. The result was a 22-yard completion to Eric Decker.)

The Broncos used great routes for beating this anticipated coverage, but Tebow was unable to connect on some of the throws.

Still, throws against Cover 3 are easier than throws against quality press-man, as long as the pass protection holds up. Denver’s protection was tremendous last week.

If tackles Ryan Clady and Orlando Franklin (who may need some help on the right side) can keep speed-rusher Mark Anderson at bay, the Broncos will be golden. (Keeping a backup like Anderson at bay may not sound difficult, but the former Bear was actually very disruptive in the last meeting.)

2. Stop the run!
The Patriots gave up 167 yards rushing in the first quarter of the Week 15 contest. They wound up winning the game handily, but they were on the fortuitous side of a few fumbles.

Common sense says you can’t bank on having success with such porous run defense. The issue last game was outside linebacker Rob Ninkovich’s inability to set the edge and the defensive line’s inability to prevent the Bronco linemen from contacting inside linebackers. This was a problem both with New England’s 3-4 and 4-3 fronts.

Nose tackle Vince Wilfork must stand out more this time around. The Broncos will be willing at times to block him one-on-one with J.D. Walton. The second-year center has been up-and-down (in a good way) handling tough solo assignments against nose tackles down the stretch this season. He was phenomenal against Antonio Garay of the Chargers in Week 12 but had been just so-so the previous week against Sione Pouha of the Jets. In Week 15 he held his own against Wilfork, but in Week 16 he got schooled by Marcell Dareus.
 
If Walton has a strong game, the Broncos can pound the rock inside. If he struggles, Denver’s at least capable of getting to the perimeter, though they’ll miss the fervid blocking of wideout Eric Decker.

3. Defending the Patriots tight ends
Greg Cosell, executive producer of the NFL Matchup Show, did an excellent job breaking down the Week 15 film back in December. Cosell wrote that the Broncos focused their coverages on Rob Gronkowski, successfully disrupting his timing by hitting him at the line of scrimmage.

However, that left fourth-round rookie safety Quinton Carter on Aaron Hernandez. Carter, like the rest of Denver’s safeties, is not great in man coverage, which Hernandez proved by posting what were at the time his career highs in catches (nine) and yards (129).

Though still a little green as a route runner (particularly against zone), Hernandez has the movement skills of a wide receiver. The Broncos may choose to defend him with rising rookie nickel back Chris Harris. That would leave safeties and linebackers to cover Gronkowski.

Defensive coordinator Dennis Allen may figure he can get away with that as long as coverage linebackers Wesley Woodyard and D.J. Williams are once again physical with the second-year superstar.

The Patriots’ counter to this would be splitting Gronkowski into a slot receiver position (likely in a spread 2 x 2 or 3 x 2 set), where he could line up a few yards off the line and operate against an overwhelmed defender in space. Even if the Broncos decided to sacrifice their run defense by going with dime personnel against the two tight ends, they still would be overmatched.

After all, just because Jonathan Wilhite is a corner doesn’t mean he can cover Gronkowski. This is the problem New England’s offense poses, this is why the Patriots are the No. 1 seed.

4. If lightning strikes twice ...
As the tight end analysis just suggested, the Broncos are faced with a very serious matchup problem that can only be solved by their players rising up and doing things no one thought they could do. It’s improbable, but as Denver’s offense showed last week, not impossible.

So let’s say for the sake of extra analysis that the Broncos can stop Gronkowski and Hernandez with their inside pass defenders. That leaves outside corners Champ Bailey and Andre Goodman on Wes Welker and Deion Branch (who did not play in the last matchup).

If the Broncos want to avoid the matchup problems that New England’s flexible formations create (such as Welker working against a linebacker in the slot), they’ll have to play man-to-man, with Bailey assigned on Welker and Goodman on Branch. Those aren’t bad matchups for either side – it would come down to who executes better (general rule of thumb, over the course of 60 minutes, put your money on the offense).

What we’re not considering is New England’s ability to run the ball. They’re not known for that, but against nickel or dime defense, they’re capable of controlling the game the old fashioned way.

Danny Woodhead has great lateral agility. BenJarvus Green-Ellis is a steady, highly professional runner. Of course, he may lose snaps to the more dynamic Stevan Ridley, a third-round rookie who has come on as of late. The Patriots have an excellent run-blocking front five with LG Logan Mankins being a premier puller, RG Brian Waters a shrewd playside anchor, LT Matt Light a crafty angles-creator (including at the second level) and RT Nate Solder a ridiculous athlete out in front.

5. Broncos pass-rush slowing down?
Pass-rush pressure is always a prerequisite for beating Tom Brady. Lately, the Patriots have nullified it with an increased emphasis on three-and five-step drops. Brady is especially sharp at this when working out of an empty backfield.

The Broncos have not had the most fervid pass-rush the last month anyway. They sacked Brady just twice in Week 15. They got Ryan Fitzpatrick just once the next week and Kyle Orton once in the season finale. They got to Ben Roethlisberger in the wild card round but that’s a product of Roethlisberger’s style of play. Denver’s pass-rush did not control the flow of last Saturday’s game. Von Miller has had just one sack since his first game back from a thumb injury (December 11 at Minnesota) and has been less explosive playing with a cast.

So who will win? Check our NFL expert picks for all divisional-round games

Follow @Andy_Benoit on Twitter or contact him at Andy.Benoit-at-NFLTouchdown.com.
Posted on: August 7, 2011 12:44 pm
Edited on: August 7, 2011 9:42 pm
 

Former Jets DE Shaun Ellis signs with Patriots

Posted by Ryan Wilson

UPDATE, 9:30 p.m. ET: Andre Carter, 32, announced on Twitter Sunday night that he too has signed with the Patriots. As Rotoworld notes, it's the latest indication that New England could be featuring  the 4-3 defense more in 2011 than they have in recent years.  Carter played the previous five seasons with the Redskins where he had just 2.5 sacks in 2010, but registered 11 sacks in 2009, and 10.5 in 2007.

-------

Defensive end Shaun Ellis spent his entire 11-year career with the Jets. An unrestricted free agent once the lockout ended in late July, Ellis has found a home, signing with the New England Patriots, sources tell the Boston Globe. The deal is for one year and contingent on Ellis passing a physical.

The Patriots have been busy reshuffling their defensive line in recent weeks. They cut Ty Warren, traded for Albert Haynesworth, and signed Mark Anderson on Friday.

Ellis' position flexibility could make it easier for the Patriots to move between 4-3 and 3-4 fronts. (Worth noting: as Bill Belichick pointed out last week, New England has played both a 4-3 and 3-4 during his tenure, although personnel usually dictates formations.) 

The Globe's Greg Bedard breaks down what the acquisition could mean for New England's defensive line:
Ellis has line versatility but expect him to make his biggest impact in subpackages at defensive tackle in a rotation with Vince Wilfork and Albert Haynesworth. Ellis killed the Patriots in the first and third matchups last year, and they often doubled him in the second game. He is an outstanding guy in the locker room. Ellis give the Patriots another player who can beat the guy in front of them one-on-one, and without the benefit of scheme. The Patriots did not have enough of those players last year. Good signing.
If Ellis, who registered 36 tackles and 4.5 sacks in 2010, is so valuable why did the Jets let him walk? For starters, he's 34. New York also drafted Muhammad Wilkerson and Kentrick Ellis, both defensive linemen, with their first two picks. And Wilkerson is expected to be the starter in Week 1.

The Jets offered Ellis a one-year, veteran minimum contract last week but he said he wanted to weigh his option. And apparently he has because now Ellis is a member of the Patriots.

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Posted on: December 15, 2010 3:31 pm
 

Mario Williams done for the season

Posted by Andy Benoit
M. Williams
The Houston Texans have placed Mario Williams on Injured Reserve. This is essentially a mercy move by a team eliminated from playoff contention. On Monday night against the Ravens Williams re-aggravated the painful sports hernia that he has been battling all season.

Gary Kubiak initially said the Texans would not shut Williams down. However, he also professed to be extremely worried about the defensive end. It has been an up-and-down season for the perennial Pro Bowler. Perhaps now we know why.

Williams’ absence will mean more snaps for pass-rushing specialist Mark Anderson. The speedy ex-Bear could get a second chance to prove his worth as an everydown player (something he failed to do in Chicago).

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Posted on: October 6, 2010 1:09 pm
Edited on: October 6, 2010 1:36 pm
 

Teammates sound surprised by Bears cut

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Andy talked a little about Mark Anderson last night and about the reasons why the Bears released him.

In effect, it didn’t seem that Andy was all that surprised. The same can’t be said for his teammates, as evidenced in this Chicago Tribune story.

As Brad Biggs writes:

The private reaction by multiple Bears players as the news broke was unified.

"What?"

That's how they replied via text messages. It's not that Anderson had been performing at a high level. But the Bears went from benching a veteran defensive lineman in Week 3 -- Tommie Harris -- to cutting one who was playing regularly after Week 4. That kind of moves catches even veterans who know NFL stands for Not For Long off guard. Maybe that very thought played a factor in the Bears' decision to make the move. Whether they will admit it or not, veterans now will be wondering when the shoe will fall again. Even starters will be on the lookout.


Grant Meanwhile, DE Charles Grant, who was signed by Chicago on Tuesday to replace Anderson, gets another chance – a few days after he was waived by the UFL.

In the Tribune, Grant calls it a rebirth. Considering the Omaha Nighthawks had just released him, I'd call this a miracle that only Nikki Sixx could understand.

And remember when Grant – who was indicted on an involuntary manslaughter charge – pleaded no contest to a misdemeanor from a 2008 incident at a Georgia bar in 2008 in which a pregnant woman was shot to death?

Well, Grant has an interesting take on that incident.

"I didn't do anything with that case. I was a victim,'' Grant said. "I had never gotten in trouble in my life.”

I guess Grant forgot about this case in 2001 when he was arrested after allegedly offering an undercover officer $50 for sex.

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Posted on: October 5, 2010 7:36 pm
 

The mysterious case of Mark Anderson

Posted by Andy Benoit

It’s hard to explain the fall of Mark Anderson. It hasn’t been quick, that’s for sure. His fall has actually been more of a tumble.
By now you know that Anderson exploded onto the NFL scene with a 12-sack rookie season. Then, apparently, he resolved to never steal the spotlight like that again. In the four seasons since his NFL debut, he has posted sack totals of 5, 1, 3.5 and 0 (2010). These are sack totals for seasons, not games.

Tuesday, the Bears finally said enough is enM. Anderson (US Presswire)ough. They released the either four-year underachiever or one-year overachiever. Replacing Anderson will be Charles Grant, the ninth-year veteran whom the Saints cut, ironically, after signing ex-Bear Alex Brown this past offseason.

Anderson’s lack of production will forever be a mystery. This wasn’t a Tommie Harris case where injuries tarnished a wealth of athleticism. Anderson has always had startling speed off the edge, and he seems to get faster when in pursuit (he made several splash plays this past Sunday night against the Giants). He has never been an adequate run-defender, though. Ultimately, this was his fatal flaw.

Grant is one of the better base end run anchors in the game. He tailed off somewhat after signing a mega contract in 2007, but he hasn’t exhibited any glaring effort issues.

That said, the Bears don’t necessarily need an elite run-defender on the edge. Including their second half debacle Sunday night, they’re giving up just 77 yards per game on the ground (sixth best in football). Israel Idonije, who wound up beating out Anderson for the starting job, is a big-bodied veteran who has experience playing inside. In other words, if the Bears want an anchor, they can turn to him.
But the Bears don’t need an anchor anyway. Rod Marinelli and Lovie Smith run a Cover 2 scheme that prioritizes penetration from the front four and relies on star linebackers Brian Urlacher and Lance Briggs to make plays. Skill-wise, Anderson is actually a better fit than Grant in Chicago’s scheme.

This isn’t to say the Bears made the wrong move. The coaches, who know Anderson better than anyone, have tried to upgrade at the end position before (remember the trade for the late Gaines Adams last year?). But since Grant is a questionable fit, don’t be surprised if fourth-round rookie Corey Wooten, a 270-pounder, is the one who ends up getting more playing time.

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Posted on: July 28, 2010 11:37 am
 

The potential impact of Julius Peppers

A couple stories today on the Bears defense and what the addition of DE Julius Peppers to the right side of the line will mean to this year’s squad.

LB Brian Urlacher is excited about Peppers. He tells the Chicago Tribune that with Peppers harassing the opposing quarterback, that will allow Chicago’s Cover-2 defensive scheme to work more effectively.

"The year before the Super Bowl and the year of the Super Bowl, we were good,'' Urlacher told the paper. "We ran so much Cover 2, and it worked. We had pressure on the quarterback. We had a lot of picks. … We have the talent and the ability to play more man coverage. But here's the thing: Cover 2 works. When we do it right and when we have pressure with our front four and we're breaking on the ball like we've been doing all this spring, it works. There is no doubt in my mind that we will have pressure on the quarterback this season.''

Urlacher said he expects the Bears to blitz less, because it’s assumed Peppers and Mark Anderson will get plenty of pressure by themselves off the edge – they replace Alex Brown and Adewale Ogunleye, a combined 12.5 sacks in 2009, from last year. Defensive tackles Tommie Harris, who probably won’t see as many double-teams because of Peppers, and Anthony Adams also will be expected to help.

Theoretically, that means the Bears could drop as many as seven defenders into pass coverage.

ESPN Chicago’s Jeff Dickerson, though, wonders about how effective Anderson can be opposite of Peppers.

From his story:

New starter Mark Anderson registered only 3.5 sacks, a far cry from his breakout rookie year in 2006 when he had 12. To further complicate matters, Anderson has been in this position before. He was elevated to first string in 2007, but was unable to effectively play both the pass and run, and eventually lost to starting position back to Brown. What has Anderson done to restore the Bears' faith in him? Why was Brown deemed expendable? These are question only Anderson can answer by his performance on the field. The Bears do have plenty of depth at defensive end in the form of Israel Idonije, Jarron Gilbert and rookie Corey Wootton, but it may be unfair to expect any of the reserves to put up high sack totals.

In the end, much of how the Bears defense will perform comes down to how Peppers plays. If he returns to his form the past two years – where he’s combined for 25 sacks – as opposed to 2007 (when he had just 2.5), he should have the ability to shoulder many of those burdens.

--Josh Katzowitz

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Posted on: July 6, 2010 4:10 pm
 

Bears counting on the wrong guy?

Bears writer Brad Biggs wrote on National Football Post today about how the team is replacing Alex Brown in Chicago:

“When I first heard it, I was pissed," Pro Bowl linebacker Lance Briggs told Comcast Sportsnet Chicago. “I was hurt. I thought bringing in Peppers was one of the greatest moves that the Bears had made, and then you get rid of you know, the other side. I mean, I just saw Alex having the highest sack total he's ever had. But when I sat down and thought about it for a while, I understand the move. I don't like it, but I understand the move.”M. Anderson (US Presswire)

Players are really not going to like the move if Anderson cannot elevate his game. The pressure will be on him because the Bears don’t have many other options. Israel Idonije will figure in the mix but he’s a role player and will probably be at left end in the rotation. If Anderson has a big season – and he should playing opposite Peppers – then players won’t be as pissed.


Anderson is a curious player. He’s the defensive version of Bucs receiver Michael Clayton. Anderson was semi-dominant as a rookie in ’06, posting 12 sacks, primarily as a pass-rushing specialist off the bench. The Bears made him a starter the following season, but in 14 games he generated just five sacks. And, at roughly 260 pounds, he was a liability against the run.

Anderson has phenomenal speed and initial quickness, but in the past two seasons (once again coming off the bench) his playing time has become fragmented, as he has tallied just 4.5 total sacks. The Bears are now counting on him to replace Brown, though don’t be surprised if Israel Idonije ends up getting a majority of the work.

--Andy Benoit

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter.
Category: NFL
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com