Tag:Mike Pereira
Posted on: December 29, 2011 11:35 am
 

Mike Pereira thinks Jon Gruden is a 'blowhard'

'Loudmouth' Gruden got ripped by Fox's Pereira for his rules analysis. (Getty Images)
By Will Brinson

As the former VP of Officiating for the NFL, Fox Sports analyst Mike Pereira's been able to provide some nice insight into the world of officiating from the angle of a broadcaster. But in his latest column, he decided to go meta and play the role of media critic, harshly ripping ESPN analyst and former Buccaneers coach Jon Gruden.

In Pereira's column, which is actually focused on Gruden, the Fox analyst calls Gruden a "blowhard" who was a "loudmouth" as a coach. Pereira then writes that he has "very little respect for [Gruden] when it comes to officiating and his knowledge of the rules."

So, um, yeah, it's a bit awkward. And it could get worse -- what happens if, as our own Mike Freeman reported, Gruden comes back to coaching and returns, hypothetically, to a team like the Rams?

They play in the NFC and their games are more likely to be aired on Fox, where Pereira could have the responsibility of objectively analyzing Gruden's challenges and the interpretation of NFL rules as they apply to Gruden's hypothetical future team.

Even though Pereira says he respects Gruden's "knowledge about X's and O's when it comes to coaching and playing the game of football," but it's difficult to believe that Pereira, who appears to hold a grudge dating from Gruden's coaching days, could do so.

Pereira's beef with Gruden's interpretation of the rules relates to helmet-to-helmet hits. It's pretty obvious that Gruden simply doesn't care for the new rules; by stating that he doesn't "understand how the games are officiated" Gruden's not actually speaking to his lack of knowledge of the rules. He's speaking to his distaste for the actual rules.

With Pereira, there's no question though. His distaste is with Gruden.

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Posted on: September 29, 2011 5:41 pm
Edited on: September 29, 2011 10:47 pm
 

Vick may not have beef but do Flacco and Big Ben?

Vick may not have a gripe with the refs, but Flacco and Roethlisberger do. (US PRESSWIRE/Getty Images)

Posted by Ryan Wilson

Mike Pereira, the former NFL VP of Officiating and current FOXSports.com analyst, didn't take kindly to Michael Vick's comments earlier this week suggesting that officials were quick to protect some quarterbacks more than others.

Of course, Vick, the Eagles QB, made these observations shortly after getting roughed up by the Giants. A day later, he admitted that "I was kind of out of character and being too candid in that aspect. Ultimately, I have respect for the referees and their decision to make calls. You won't hear me complaining about it no more."

During a radio appearance Monday, Pereira called Vick's initial remarks "ridiculous," adding that "[I]t took me back to my job in New York when I worked for the league, and it was a constant complaint by the Eagles, whether it was McNabb at quarterback or whether it was Vick. They clearly complained more than any other team.”

Well, three days later and Pereira's still smarting -- he devoted an entire column to disproving that officials play favorites.

Regarding the myth that "The NFL protects its big-name quarterbacks," Pereira writes: 

"Well, I guess you are right — if you feel that the top three QBs in the league are Jason Campbell, Jay Cutler and Colt McCoy. Statistics from the 2010 season, combined with the first three weeks of the 2011 season, show that the Raiders’ Campbell ranked No. 1 in drawing roughing the passer penalties, getting 1.46 for every 100 passes. The Bears’ Cutler drew 1.28 and Cleveland's McCoy 1.20. Oh, and by the way, next in line was the PanthersJimmy Clausen at 1.0."


Patriots vs. Raiders, Panthers vs. Bears, Steelers vs. Texans, plus three more of the must-see games for Week Four. Get predictions from the expert hosts of Inside the NFL.

We don't recall Vick specifically stating that big-name quarterbacks got special treatment, but regarding the list above, the reason Campbell, Cutler and McCoy led the league in drawing rougher-the-passer penalties last season is because they got hit more than most other quarterbacks. Campbell and Cutler are known to hold the ball a long time and McCoy was a rookie trying to decipher NFL defenses on the fly. Oh, and the Raiders, Bears and Browns were among the league's worst pass-blocking teams. According to FootballOutsiders.com, Oakland ranked 26th in adjusted sack rate (defined as "sacks per pass attempt adjusted for down, distance, and opponent"), Chicago was 32nd and Cleveland was 23rd. That's an important distinction Pereira somehow overlooked.

Pereira continues: "What about Tom Brady and Peyton Manning? Let me look down the list, although it might take me a while since they both are way down there. Brady does get more protection than Manning, that’s for sure. Brady has drawn 0.16 roughing the passer calls per 100 attempts compared to 0.15 for Manning. That, for Brady, is one call in every 625 pass attempts, while for Manning it is one call for every 679 attempts."

Pereira's right: Brady and Manning rarely benefit from roughing the passer penalties. There's a simple explanation, too: they're the beneficiaries of good offensive lines and they, along with Drew Brees, get rid of the ball quicker than anybody else in the league. Adjusted sack rate bears this out: In 2010, the Colts were first, the Patriots were sixth. Again, this is probably worth mentioning.

But what about the quarterbacks who play behind atrocious o-lines but also rarely get roughing-the-passer calls? Those are the guys who might have legitimate beefs with the officials, right? 

Joe Flacco
2010 Ravens adjusted sack rate: 25th
Roughing-the-passer-calls per 100 pass attempts: 0.00

David Garrard
2010 Jaguars adjusted sack rate: 24th
Roughing-the-passer-calls per 100 pass attempts: 0.00

Ben Roethlisberger
2010 Steelers adjusted sack rate: 29th
Roughing-the-passer-calls per 100 pass attempts: 0.20

Alex Smith
2010 49ers adjusted sack rate: 30th
Roughing-the-passer-calls per 100 pass attempts: 0.48

While Vick, on average, might get the calls other quarterbacks get, Flacco, Roethlisberger and Smith would be right to wonder why they don't.

Finally, something the Ravens and Steelers can agree on.

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Posted on: September 27, 2011 10:04 pm
 

Pereira calls Vick's comments on refs ridiculous

Vick is frustrated by hits. (Getty Images)
Posted by Ryan Wilson

After the Giants thoroughly dismantled the Eagles Sunday, a bruised (but not broken!) and battered Michael Vick spoke with the media. Philly's quarterback had been forced from the game for the second straight week, this time with a right-hand injury. He wasted little time getting to the point.

"At some point something catastrophic is going to happen," he said. "Not to blame the refs or say that it was their fault, it's just one of those unfortunate situations and I just think more precautions should be taken when I'm inside the pocket. If you look at all the replays, I'm on the ground every time and it's unfortunate for myself and it's unfortunate for my team and I'll be lying if I said I wasn't, if I were to sit here and say I wasn't frustrated right now because of that."

A day later, Vick softened his stance. "I was kind of out of character and being too candid in that aspect. Ultimately, I have respect for the referees and their decision to make calls. You won't hear me complaining about it no more."

The NFL hasn't commented publicly on Vick's observations which we take to mean that the issue is behind us. Except that former NFL VP of Officiating Mike Pereira, who now works as a FOX NFL analyst, has some thoughts on the matter.

Appearing on SiriusXM Radio's Evan and Phillips in the Morning (transcription via PFT), Pereira needed only six words to get to the heart of the matter.

“Well, I thought it was ridiculous,” he said.

There's more, of course.

“It actually took me back, it took me back to my job in New York when I worked for the league, and it was a constant complaint by the Eagles, whether it was [Donovan] McNabb at quarterback or whether it was Vick. They clearly complained more than any other team.”

And more still.

“He’s a quarterback that’s on the move, he’s going to get hit more,” Pereira said. “Yes, there are a couple that may be missed but the fact that a ton of them are missed and that he’s hit late all the time is absurd. And he comes out and kind of does the mea culpa yesterday but at the same time what did he say? ‘I was being too candid.’ Well, that doesn’t sound to me like much of an apology. And also the damage is done. I don’t want to be the referee that goes in there now next and works with him. If he calls a roughing the passer penalty for a hit on Vick everybody’s going to say, ‘Well, Vick taunted him into that.’ If he doesn’t [call it] there’s going to be more criticism. So I think it was a bunch of bull and it didn’t sit well with me and it still doesn’t.”

Vick M.A.S.H. update
On one hand, we understand Vick's frustration. The guy takes an absolute beating. On the other hand, it is ridiculous to suggest that he's alone. Ben Roethlisberger is a perfect example. Not only is he mobile in the pocket, but he's also a huge target. If anybody had a legit complaint about not getting calls, it's Big Ben. (Remember when Haloti Ngata broke Roethlisberger's nose by clubbing him in the face last season? No flag, though Ngata was later fined.)

Jay Cutler and Tony Romo also take weakly drubbings, and Joe Flacco and Matt Ryan have been known to get rocked a time or 10 a game, too.

The difference between Vick and the five other quarterbacks we listed? Vick's the only one bellyaching publicly. And let's be honest: it's not like he's playing behind the Texans' offensive line. The five guys responsible for protecting Vick are, to put it kindly, a mess. Maybe Philly's QB should first direct his comments at offensive coordinator Marty Mornhinweg since he's responsible for dialing up the plays that inevitably lead to Vick getting peeled off the turf.

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Posted on: July 18, 2011 8:38 pm
Edited on: July 18, 2011 9:46 pm
 

New rule could make for longer games in 2011

Posted by Ryan Wilson

Every offseason, the NFL's competition committee convenes to discuss which rules to add, modify or scrap altogether. Mike Pereira, the former NFL Vice President of Officiating who now works for Fox Sports, writes Monday that in anticipation of the 2011 season, 121 NFL officials just completed a three-day clinic in Dallas where, among other things, they were apprised of the rules changes.

Some new rules were met with outspoken criticism (unsurprisingly, James Harrison took the lead on that), although the most controversial decision had to be the one that resulted in no change at all.

Last season, Lions wide receiver Calvin Johnson had a touchdown overturned against division rival Chicago after it was determined that he hadn't met all the criteria for what the NFL considered a legal catch. Crazy us, we just thought it involved, you know, catching the ball in the end zone.

If you can stand it, here's the play in question: 



No matter how many times we watch that replay, we always expect it to be ruled a touchdown since it looks ... just like a touchdown.

Pereira explains why, in fact, the pass thrown to Johnson is still considered incomplete.

"There were no substantial changes to the catch rule. There are three elements to a catch when going to the ground. First, you must get total control. Second, you must get both feet or another body part down. Third, and the trickiest, you must maintain control throughout the entire process of going to and hitting the ground. The ground can cause an incompletion in the field of play or end zone. The competition committee affirmed that the pass to Johnson was incomplete as the ball came out of his control when it hit the ground. He completed the first two elements of the catch but not the third."

This will placate almost certainly no one, but to quote every coach or athlete to ever talk to the media, "It is what it is." Moving on...

A rules change everyone can get behind: every scoring play will automatically be reviewed. The goal is to reduce missed calls and save coaches from wasting challenges, but Pereira notes that there will be unintended consequences, too. "There will be a lot more replay stoppages in 2011, and the length of games will increase. Neither of those is good for the game."

On this last point we can all agree. Presumably, even James Harrison.

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Posted on: January 12, 2011 10:27 am
 

Former head of officiating says change Tuck Rule

Posted by Andy Benoit

The NFL’s former head of officiating, Mike Pereira, has done a fantastic job as the rules expert on FOX this season. His mastery of the rulebook and insider background give him unique – and unquestioned – credibility. That’s why it’s newsworthy when he suggests that a rule as prominent as the Tuck Rule needs to be altered.

In his recent FOXSports.com column, Pereira talked about the tuck rule ruling on the Matt Cassel fumble (err….incompletion) from the Chiefs-Ravens wild card game.

This was the classic tuck play.

Rule 3, Section 2 states "when a team ‘A’ player (passer) is holding the ball to pass it forward, any intentional forward movement of his hand starts the forward pass, even if the player loses possession of the ball as he attempting to tuck it back toward his body."
This was clearly a correct reversal, but is it time to look at this rule? Cassel was not attempting to pass the ball when it came loose. By instinct, referee Mike Carey ruled this a fumble because that's what it appeared to be.

I think it's time to change this rule. A pass should only be ruled incomplete if the ball comes loose in the actual act of passing the ball. If it comes loose in the tucking motion, then it should be a fumble.

I would support a rule change, although it took me a long time to get to this point. I'm sure it's no consolation to the many Raiders fans around the country.


Ah yes, the infamous originally Tuck Rule play. Without that play, the Patriots aren’t champions in 2001. Without that 2001 banner, Tom Brady and Bill Belichick might not have become leaders of a dynasty.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com