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Tag:Orlando Scandrick
Posted on: December 7, 2011 10:43 am
Edited on: December 7, 2011 12:05 pm
 

Film Room: Cowboys vs. Giants preview

Posted by Eye on Football Analyst Andy Benoit


A hallmark rivalry renews Sunday night with the first of a two-game series between the Cowboys and Giants that will likely decide the NFC East. We’ve recently grown familiar with the Giants as they’ve spent the past few weeks on football’s center stage (Patriots-Eagles-Saints-Packers!).

In examining whether they can break their slump and get back above .500, we take an in-depth look at how they match up with this week’s familiar foe.


1. Stopping DeMarco Murray
New York’s most valuable contributor Sunday night might just be Jason Garrett. The Cowboys’ play-caller unwisely drifted away from Murray in the second half against the Dolphins on Thanksgiving, and he all but abandoned Murray against the Cardinals last week (12 carries, just seven after the first quarter).

Garrett’s pass-first decision at Arizona was likely in response to the aggression of the Cardinals linebackers. They recklessly attacked downhill much of the game, often as part of designed blitzes. Garrett may have felt that passing against an iffy and over-leveraged Cardinals secondary was the best response.

That said, Garrett can’t simply let Murray become an afterthought. The rookie running back has been the stabilizing force of the Cowboys’ offense. In recent weeks, the Cowboys’ front line has played with enough power in the ground game that, with the help of fluid H-back John Phillips, it’s realistic to think they could push the pile against aggressive linebacking. Even if they couldn’t, Garrett could still feature his young back in the passing game. Murray has soft hands and is smart in protection. Screen passes are a great way to punish fast downhill linebackers.
 
Expect the Giants to attack with their second level defenders much in the same way the Cardinals did. Defensive coordinator Perry Fewell knows that this might make Garrett one-dimensional in his play-calling. What’s more, the way to contain Murray is to make him go east and west early in the run. He has decent lateral agility and change-of-direction but only if he’s already built momentum.

By shooting the gaps, the Giants will push Murray to the perimeter, where he’s less dangerous. If the Giants continue to operate out of their big nickel package (two linebackers, three safeties), they’ll have enough speed on the field to chase the outside runs.

2. Cowboys passing game
Shooting the gaps against Murray will leave New York more susceptible to play-action passing and one-on-one matchups downfield. That’s a risk the Giants should be willing to take. They have a quasi-shutdown corner in Corey Webster.

They likely believe they can cover Jason Witten with one of their three safeties, or even with athletic linebacker Jacquian Williams. Williams was matched one-on-one against Jimmy Graham and Jermichael Finley the past two weeks. He was defeated in both matchups, but the Giants may be inclined to trust him again this week. Witten is elite, but he’s a prototypical tight end, not an insanely athletic hybrid wideout like Graham or Finley.

The Cowboys’ passing attack is interesting. Early in the season, it flowed through Witten. A few weeks ago, most noticeably on Thanksgiving, it was flowing through Laurent Robinson (a graceful, long-striding, deceptively fast street free agent who has blossomed now that he’s finally stayed healthy). Last week, it flowed through Dez Bryant, even though Bryant was defended by rising star Patrick Peterson. And keep in mind, last season, the passing attack flowed through Miles Austin, who may return this week from his hamstring injury.

In Dallas’ system, the go-to target is often determined by whom Tony Romo feels most comfortable with. Romo’s comfort may be influenced by the rhythm of the game. When things are grinding, Witten’s the guy. When everything flows, it’s Robinson. When it’s a sporadic, sandlot type game, he likes Bryant. The Giants will have studied the Cowboys’ offense all week. Whom they decide to put No. 1 corner Webster on will tell you who THEY think Romo likes most.

3. Tyron Smith
The first-round rookie right tackle from USC has been better than advertised, showing improvement with every start. Smith, the youngest player in the NFL, has uncommonly light feet for 310-pounder. He’s dripping with athleticism, which is evident when he lands blocks off short-area movement in the run game. His technique continues to be a work in progress – he was exploited by wily defenders early in the season and had a tough time against Cameron Wake two games ago – but it’s much better at this point than most expected.

That said, there may not be a worse player to face in a war of fundamentals than Justin Tuck. The seventh-year veteran has had a down season, but he’s still one of the craftiest – if not THE craftiest – ends in football.

If the Giants cared about our viewing entertainment, they’d move Tuck to the defensive right side and let Jason Pierre-Paul, the most dynamic young athlete playing defensive end today, go mano-a-mano against Smith.

4. Rob Ryan’s pass-rush tactics
Rob Ryan’s primary focus is on creating one-on-one situations for DeMarcus Ware. The league’s most prolific sack artist over the last five years almost always aligns on the open side of the offensive formation (i.e. away from the tight end).

To help ensure more one-on-ones for Ware – and to simply generate as much pressure as possible – Ryan walks safeties down into the box (Abe Elam’s physical strength is a plus for this), uses fire-X blitzes with his inside linebackers (where the left linebacker attacks the right A-gap and the right linebacker attacks the left A-gap) and often brings cornerback Orlando Scandrick off the edge from the slot (Scandrick is an excellent blitzer).

Ryan may want to be a bit cautious this week. Eli Manning is superb at identifying blitzes and audibling. Plus, it was on a double A-gap blitz that Ryan got outsmarted by Ken Whisenhunt with a screen pass for LaRod Stephens-Howling on the overtime touchdown last week. Ahmad Bradshaw is very good in the screen game.



5. Defending Cruz
Over the years, the Giants have had a field day going after Orlando Scandrick with slot receiver Steve Smith. Scandrick has drastically improved all-around in his third season. But the Giants also have a more dynamic slot weapon in surprising 1,000-yard receiver Victor Cruz. Cruz has big, ball-plucking hands and sinewy body control that allow him to make late adjustments to the ball. His powerful elusiveness after the catch makes him a threat to score on any play.

If Scandrick is blitzing or outside, the Cowboys are more likely to play a zone or some sort of off-coverage in the slot. The Cardinals had their outside and slot receivers align tight to one another last week, which the Cowboys defended by playing off-coverage inside. That left easy eight-yard completions on the table. Manning will gladly take those if given the opportunity.

The Cowboys may defend the seam with safety help – which could keep Cruz, as well as surprising downfield producer Jake Ballard, in-check. In that case, Scandrick would be an underneath defender, where he’s most comfortable. The cost here is that this safety help would either water down some of the blitz designs or leave one-on-one coverage against Hakeem Nicks outside.

Rob Ryan’s best bet might be to mix and match with disguise, in hopes of setting up a Manning turnover.

So who will win? Check our NFL expert picks for all Week 14 games

Follow @Andy_Benoit on Twitter or contact him at Andy.Benoit-at-NFLTouchdown.com.
Posted on: September 18, 2011 3:08 pm
Edited on: September 18, 2011 5:44 pm
 

Dez Bryant inactive for Cowboys Sunday

Posted by Will Brinson


Earlier in the week, Dallas owner Jerry Jones made some comments about wideout Dez Bryant's status that made it seem as if Bryant was a full-on go for Sunday's game against the 49ers. Not so much: the second-year wide receiver is inactive Sunday for the Cowboys game in San Francisco.

Bryant is out with a thigh bruise, which he suffered on a punt return Sunday against the Jets, and which caused serious cramping for the wideout during the second half of last week's loss. Per the Cowboys website, Bryant tested the leg at Candlestick, but the team didn't feel as if he was ready to go.

But he's out, along with most of the Cowboys secondary -- Terrence Newman and Orlando Scandrick, most notably -- which makes a pretty good matchup against a weak 49ers team suddenly kind of dangerous.

Of course, this will only inspire Drew Pearson to say more nice things about Bryant's production thus far in his young career.

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Posted on: September 15, 2011 3:52 pm
Edited on: September 21, 2011 3:07 pm
 

Dez Bryant misses practice, will play; Newman out

Posted by Will Brinson

The two most interesting things to come out of the Cowboys loss to the Jets this past Sunday were 1) Dez Bryant is an absolute monster and 2) the Dallas secondary isn't as bad as we thought.

We think -- Dallas' defensive backs will need to step it up again this weekend, as Terrence Newman will miss Week 2 as well, Jerry Jones said, according to our Cowboys Rapid Reporter Nick Eatman.

"He would go if we asked him to go," Jones said. "We're using experience we've had with him. In this particular case, if we hadn't had this similar injury before, we'd probably have him out there for the San Francisco game."

That "similar injury" is the hamstring injury that Newman suffered through during 2008, when he played in just 10 games. Jones also noted that "if this were the Super Bowl," Newman would be on the field. (He declined, however, to point out that "there's zero chance Alex Smith will ever play in a Super Bowl" which is kind of why Newman will sit.)

"Terence has to have it just right. It isn’t just right," Jones said. "Hopefully it will be there next week."

Additionally, Mike Jenkins and Orlando Scandrick didn't practice on Wednesday, so there's a chance Dallas' secondary is severely limited on Sunday. But, hey, there's some good news: Dez Bryant is supposed to play, despite missing Thursday's practice with a thigh bruise.

"Dez is a guy that, certainly, we want him to get everything he can get," Jones said. "But certainly he's capable of making game-winning plays for us without that rep. And so, while we want him to evolve and do the things you want him to do with experience, if he's healthy, he's valuable to us."

Extremely valuable -- Bryant showed precisely what he's capable of against the Jets on Sunday night and if he can stay healthy, he appears poised to make a leap into the elite level of wide receivers in the near future.

Given that his "injury" is really more about getting him rest and making sure he's ready to roll for the game against the 49ers, it seems safe to say he'll play, especially since Jones told Eatman that he "expects" Dez to be ready to go come game time.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com