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Tag:Peyton Manning Contract
Posted on: September 9, 2011 2:53 pm
 

Colts can get out of Manning deal after one year?

Posted by Will Brinson

Peyton Manning is going to miss at least eight weeks. It sure seems like it'll be longer and it's hard to imagine that the Colts bring him back for part of season -- thereby risking serious long-term injury -- if they're not in serious contention come November or December.

But what about longer than that? Turns out, the Colts built a little safeguard of sorts into the five-year, $95 million deal that Manning signed at the end of July. Adam Schefter of ESPN reports that the Colts incorporated a team option for a $28 million bonus that must be picked up five days before the start of the 2012 league year beginning.

In other words, Manning will get his full salary this season -- $23 million -- but the Colts could conceivably allow him to become an unrestricted free agent following this season if they decided not to pick up his option.

There's only one real scenario where this might happen, and that's if Peyton's recovery goes so poorly that he's on the verge of retiring because of potential life-threatening damage to his neck and/or spine should he continue to play football.

If Manning returns for the 2012 season -- as most doctors, both real and the unlicensed variety, ahem, believe he will -- you can bet that the Colts will be keeping him on the roster.

But it certainly warrants mentioning that they won't necessarily have to pay Peyton the full $95 million if he doesn't take another snap in his career.

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Posted on: February 10, 2011 2:11 pm
 

Colts, Manning's agent haven't spoken in a while

Posted by Will Brinson

Recently, Colts owner Jim Irsay tweeted that there were several big announcements coming for the Colts. Presumably, one of those would/will be a new contract for franchise quarterback Peyton Manning.

However, Colts president Bill Polian told the Indianapolis Star on Wednesday that the team and Manning's agent Tom Condon hadn't spoken since January, probably since they extended a preliminary offer to the quarterback.

"It'll get done when it gets done," he said Wednesday. "We're in a very, very unsettled situation as an industry, so I don't have any timetable specifically."

In other words, it's not really a "we can't get anything done because we disagree on things" situation (like the CBA!) and it's really more of a matter that the two sides haven't been chatting.

However, that does mean that Manning's more and more likely to get franchised -- the Colts can apply the tag, which may or may not survive the labor negotiations, beginning today thru February 22nd. 

Since there's less than a zero percent chance Indianapolis will allow Manning to become a free agent, they'll absolutely use that designation, even if it means owing Manning $23 million-ish in 2011.

It's worth noting, too, that in 2004 the Colts also used the franchise tag on Manning, but worked out a new deal within 10 days of doing so. That could be the case this year as well, especially since tagging him year-after-year-after-year would be fairly pricy.

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Posted on: January 23, 2011 2:57 pm
 

Report: Colts make Manning prelim contract offer

Posted by Will Brinson

Lost in all the NFL's offseason concerns is a problem looming for the Colts -- Peyton Manning is a free agent. There's good news on that front, as Indianapolis has reportedly extended the first offer to Manning.

The deal that the Colts slid across the table to agent Tom Condon and Manning, according to ESPN, would make him the highest-paid player in NFL history. It also, reportedly, is "more lucrative" than Tom Brady's recent four-year, $72 million deal and has a bigger signing bonus than Brady's $48.5 million.

However, time's pretty limited for Indy and Peyton -- at 11:59 PM on March 3rd, the league year will end and teams will not be able to sign players to new contracts until the labor negotiations are resolved. Both sides (Manning and the Colts, that is) apparently believe a deal will be reached within the next month, but the Colts are reportedly willing to place the franchise tag on Manning, even though doing so would mean paying him more than $23 million in 2011.

Additionally, the franchise tag isn't guaranteed to survive a new labor deal, but the Colts value Manning enough that they're willing to take the chance rather than allow him to hit the open market after the 2010 season.

Part of the Colts' proposal, according to the report, involves giving Manning less money (but still making him the highest-paid player in NFL history) in order to maintain financial flexibility to bring in more outside talent and beef up the team's chances of winning another Super Bowl in the Manning era.

That seems like a pretty good angle to take with Manning -- although he's obviously one of the all-time great NFL quarterbacks, there's no question that he's aware how much his legacy would be improved with multiple titles. Given how much money he has in his bank account already (hint: a lot), it stands to reason that if he could become the highest-paid player in the NFL and beef up Indy's shot at winning, he'd be interested.

And of course, there's the matter of whether or not the Colts are wise to cough up so much money for one player. The quick answer: Yes. The longer answer: there's a very good reason why Manning has so many MVP awards -- he's really valuable. Without him, Indy could have won some games the past few years, but there's no question that he's the primary reason why they've established an AFC South dynasty over the last few years.

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