Play Fantasy The Most Award Winning Fantasy game with real time scoring, top expert analysis, custom settings, and more. Play Now
 
Tag:Phil Costa
Posted on: October 1, 2011 4:16 pm
 

For the gambler in you, Week 4

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Each Saturday, we’ll take the best -- and most clever -- odds collected by bodog.com for the upcoming week and give our take. This is important stuff, perhaps the most important post you’ll read all week. Because if you can’t lose money while watching a game in which you have absolutely no effect, what’s the point of watching sports at all?

Odds to win the Super Bowl XLVI
                                                Pre-Season      Last Week        Current
New England Patriots                   11/2                  9/2                    9/2

Green Bay Packers                      7/1                    11/2                  9/2

Philadelphia Eagles                     15/2                  8/1                    14/1

Indianapolis Colts                       20/1                  150/1                200/1

Detroit Lions                                30/1                  18/1                  16/1

Minnesota Vikings                       40/1                  75/1                  200/1

Kansas City Chiefs                      50/1                  200/1                500/1

Washington Redskins                 100/1                  45/1                  45/1

Carolina Panthers                      125/1                125/1                150/1

Buffalo Bills                               150/1                75/1                  28/1

Cincinnati Bengals                     150/1                 150/1                250/1

My, how things have changed for the Colts, Vikings, Chiefs and Bills. I still would take the Packers to win the Super Bowl, I certainly wouldn’t take the Dream Team, and just for fun, I’d give the Bills a shot (and I doubt that Fred Jackson would disagree with you). And if you said the Colts season is 10 times worse than you could have imagined, technically you’d be right according to these odds.

Said Richard Gardner, the Bodog sportsbook manager: “The big story this week is the Buffalo Bills who were 150-1 preseason have gone all the way down to 28-1. That is the lowest they have been in years and are a team to be reckoned with all of a sudden.”

Will the Minnesota Vikings blow a double-digit lead this week against the Kansas City Chiefs? 

Yes +650    

No  -1200  

It’d be pretty awesome if they did (Vikings fans might disagree), since they’ve done exactly that the first three games of the season. But Minnesota is playing the Chiefs, so the Vikings should be safe from another disastrous second half.

How many total interceptions will Tom Brady throw in the 2011 regular season?

Over/Under 14.5

After throwing four interceptions last week against the Bills (and, busy man that he is, he threw four touchdowns as well), Brady has five on the season. Do you remember the last time Brady threw 15 interceptions in a season? Neither do I, because it’s never, ever happened (he has thrown 14 picks three times, though). Take the under.

How many times will Tony Romo fumble or drop the snap Week 4?      

Over 1½ (+110)

Under 1½ (-150)

(Must hit a part of Tony Romo and hit the ground.)

Call this one the Phil Costa section of the post. He’s the Cowboys center who made at least four bad snaps that hit off Romo or went over his head that led to fumbles, though the Redskins -- who were allegedly distracting Costa by calling out the snap count -- didn’t recover any of them and they lost. Somehow, I think Costa will be perfect this week. Go under.

When will Chris Johnson record his first 100-yard or more rushing game in the 2011 regular season?

Week 4 vs. Cleveland +200

Week 5 or after -300

Johnson has 98 yards on the season (on the season!!!). But the Browns rank 29th in the league with 128.7 rushing yards allowed per game. So, it’s kind of a tossup. I don’t like the +200, but I think you’d have to go with Week 4. It’s time for a Johnson breakout and the Browns seem like the perfect opportunity.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.
Posted on: September 30, 2011 9:33 am
 

Suh won't 'FBI half-target' Romo's ribs

Posted by Will Brinson

Before last week's Monday night tilt between the Redskins and Cowboys, DeAngelo Hall caused quite a stir by stating that he would target the broken ribs of quarterback Tony Romo. (Hall missed the mark.)

This week, as my colleague Andy Benoit pointed out yesterday, Romo will be dealing with a substantially better tackler in Lions defensive tackle and general havoc-wrecker Ndamukong Suh. Suh won't put an official target on Romo, but his comments, via Howard Balzer of 101Sports.com, are equally as terrifying.

"There isn't going to be any FBI half-target on him," Suh said. "But I am on his right side, as everybody wants to point out. I am coming at him from that side. If I accidentally hit (the broken rib), so be it. It's not my problem, not my issue to deal with. I just go for the ball because that's the only thing that can hurt you.

"I am 307 pounds. I am pretty sure if I land on you with all my weight, you are going to feel it."
Week 4 NFL Preview

The cool thing about that statement is that Suh managed to a) inform Romo he is coming after him, b) take a potshot at Hall for the weaksauce target he put on Romo's ribs and c) make sure and avoid already putting a fine in the books for the first time he touches Romo.

Make no mistake, though -- Suh wants to be more effective than he was last week.

"I was definitely not disruptive enough," he said per The Detroit News. "I am not satisfied with the way I played. I am going to try and redeem myself and get back on track."

If the Cowboys offensive line behaves like it did on Monday night, Suh's going to be just fine come next week.

But he's being wise with his comments -- alerting the league and the refs to an intent to hurt would be foolish and only add to the "dirty" reputation that Suh's managed to (incorrectly, in my opinion) pick up in his first year and a quarter in the league.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.
Posted on: September 28, 2011 8:34 pm
 

Redskins refute Phil Costa; say they didn't cheat

CostaPosted by Josh Katzowitz

If anybody was a goat from the victorious Cowboys squad during last Monday’s win against the Redskins, it was center Phil Costa’s ghastly performance whenever he had to snap the ball to Tony Romo. It was, as my CBSSports.com colleague Ryan Wilson pointed out, akin to a Benny Hill skit (albeit without that kick-ass, show-ending music).

Though Costa took the blame for his poor performance -- “There’s no blaming the refs,” he said. “It’s on me.” -- he also said it wasn’t totally on him. Instead, he blamed the Redskins defensive line for cheating, accusing them of calling out the snap count to keep Costa out of rhythm. It is, of course, illegal for a defensive player to try to screw up the cadence of the quarterback, but as CBSSports.com’s Mike Freeman writes, teams from around the league (and across history) have performed the same maneuver.

Thing is, we don’t know for sure if the Redskins were cheating, because when they were asked about it Wednesday, they denied doing it in the first place.

 “Honestly, I don’t understand how I could simulate his snap count,” said Redskins defensive end Stephen Bowen, who was suspected of such tactics because he used to play in Dallas. “Am I supposed to memorize the colors and the numbers he was saying? Honestly, I lost a lot of respect for Costa. If that was the case, then why didn’t any of their offensive linemen jump offsides? It makes no sense, because he’s lying. Just be a man and stand by your word. Everybody respects a man that tells the truth.”

While Romo said after the game the Cowboys would have to talk to the league about cracking down on this practice, the officials apparently questioned Bowen during the game.

“Even during the game, the ref came to us and asked if we were making fake snap counts, and I looked at Barry [Cofield] like, ‘Huh? Did you make a noise? I didn’t make a noise. I didn’t even hear anything,’” Bowen said. “So for him to say that, I’m disappointed, and I lost respect in him. He’s making excuses for messing up. And they’re trying to make me out to be some guy that I’m not. I’m not that type of person. I just line up and play ball.”

Redskins coach Mike Shanahan also made a good point, saying that when the center is mic’d up, it’s easy for an observer to determine whether anybody other than the quarterback is shouting. According to Shanahan, nobody from his team was saying a snap count.

To make matters even more interesting, Fox Sports’ Matt Mosley reported that Dallas’ Jason Hatcher said Bowen was NOT shouting out his own cadence. Mosley wrote that it could have been a Redskins linebacker instead.

Unless we hear the audio, there’s really no way to determine if Costa is telling the truth or if the Redskins really did cheat. But either way, the blame will be pinned on Costa. If yelling the snap count is a part of the league culture, you’d like to think the center who is playing in his own building could focus a little better than that. And if the Redskins weren’t doing it, then Costa just had one of the worst games out of a center that I’ve ever seen on any level of football.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.
Posted on: September 28, 2011 11:35 am
 

Orakpo thinks Romo injury blown out of proportion

Orakpo: Romo injury overblown. (US PRESSWIRE)
Posted by Ryan Wilson

A week ago, a punctured lung and broken ribs couldn't keep Tony Romo from leading the Cowboys to an overtime win over the 49ers. On Monday night, Romo's legend grew with another gutsy performance against NFC East rival Washington.

But not everybody is impressed with Romo's threshold for pain. Take, for example, Redskins linebacker Brian Orakpo, who addressed the matter Tuesday during an appearance on John Thompson's radio show (quotes via the Sports Bog's Dan Steinberg).

“To me they blown it way out of proportion,” Orakpo said. “I mean, they tried to make it seem like the guy was hospitalized the night before the game, just so we could build it up if they was to win the game — oh he’s a courageous player to go out there and play. The guy was playing just like Tony Romo, running around, making throws. He got hit throughout the whole game and still getting up. I mean, it was blown way out of proportion, but it is what it is.”

Orakpo sounded even more perplexed at how Romo avoided a single turnover despite center Phil Costa's predilection for horribly mistimed snaps.

“I mean, Romo got some type of lucky charm in his back pocket,” Orakpo said. “Because it seemed like every time the ball was on the floor, he was able to scoop it up, not fumbling one time, scoop it up and pick it up and try to at least make a play. Very unfortunate for us. I mean, I’m so disappointed in the outcome. We left a lot on the table. We could have easily won that game.”

To be fair, the reason for the four botched snaps was because the Redskins were, you know, cheating. Surprised Orakpo didn't mention that during his diatribe.

Then again, Orakpo doesn't take issue with DeAngelo Hall's f-bomb-tastic post-game tirade, noting that Hall wishes "he could take it back, but I don’t blame him. He’s already a hothead, so why would you put a camera in his face?"

That's a fair point.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter, subscribe to our NFL newsletter, and while you're add it, add our RSS Feed.
Posted on: September 27, 2011 7:00 pm
Edited on: September 27, 2011 7:00 pm
 

Romo: Redskins D kept calling out snap count

'Skins D didn't do Cowboys C Phil Costa any favors. (AP)
Posted by Ryan Wilson

It's taken less than two weeks, but Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo has gone from perennial choker to the toughest guy in football (apologies to Michael Vick, who just can't seem to get a call).

Romo showed that again Monday when he faced a non-stop assault from the Redskins defense, and he got very little help from his center, Phil Costa, who seemed incapable of delivering the ball to his quarterback on the snap count (you can watch in horror here).

After the fourth miscue we just figured it was some elaborate Benny Hill comedy sketch (stranger things have happen) because there's no way a professional athlete having played football most of his life would continually struggle with one of the most basic acts in the game.

Turns out, Costa's troubles were due to one thing: the Redskins were cheating. Specifically, Washington simulated Romo's snap count.

After the game Romo said, "We've got to get the snap thing worked out. Costa said the D-line kept calling out the snap count. We'll get that worked out. We'll tell the league and see if that's something that can be fixed because you're not supposed to be able to do that. So we'll see. But we can't have that happen. We shouldn't have been in that situation."

Costa, for his part, didn't point fingers. “There’s no blaming the refs. It’s on me.”

According to NFL rules, it's illegal for defensive players to mimic the quarterback's cadence in an attempt to confuse the offense. We look forward to DeAngelo Hall's measured take on the matter.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter, subscribe to our NFL newsletter, and while you're add it, add our RSS Feed.
Posted on: September 7, 2011 3:27 pm
Edited on: September 8, 2011 4:45 pm
 

Film Room: Jets vs. Cowboys preview

Posted by Eye on Football Analyst Andy Benoit



The Ryan Brothers are about more than oversized mouths and midsections. They’re two of the craftiest defensive scientists in today’s NFL.

Rob, in his first season as Dallas’ defensive coordinator, is hoping to build the same type of confounding defense that his brother has constructed in New York.

That’s a tall order.

The Jets have had two full years of experience in The Ryan System; the Cowboys, thanks to the lockout, have not quite had two months. The Jets also have the luxury of designing coverages around Darrelle Revis, the best shutdown corner since Deion Sanders.

The Cowboys, on the other hand, are just hoping that Terence Newman, who showed signs of decline last season, can recover from a groin injury in time to play. Whether he does or not, the Cowboy corners figure to need safety help Sunday night.

The Cowboys defense will improve under Rob Ryan, but it’s a question of when. The Jets defense, we already know, is ready to go. For this reason, we’ll focus our five key points on Cowboys O vs. Jets D – a matchup that, as you’ll see, drastically favors Gang Green.

1. Selling Out
What Rex Ryan does as well as any coach in football is attack tendencies. In other words, for simplicity sake, say that on second-and-10, data shows that the opposing offense uses play action 75 percent of the time. The Jets, on second-and-10, will employ a defensive tactic that goes all-out towards stopping play action.

This might seem like an obvious move. But a majority of NFL coaches are hindered by fear about that 25 percent chance of getting burned by a non-play action call. Not Ryan. He always looks to feast on an offense’s predictability. That’s one reason his players love him. Worth noting is that last season, the Cowboys often clang to basic personnel formations and had a tendency to be predictable.



2. The Disguise
While it’s true the Jets are one of football’s blitz-happiest teams (especially on third down), it’s a myth that their playbook is thick with myriad blitz designs. In actuality, the Jets use a relatively modest collection of blitz packages. The difference is that they execute these blitzes with a wide variety of personnel. Insiders call this "cross training", when a team has multiple players from multiple positions performing the same techniques. The Jets have nearly mastered it. This versatility is why defenders can roam around before the snap and disguise their looks.

3. The Execution
A lot of Ryan’s pass-rush designs look like blitzes but actually involve only four pass-rushers. Often, the pass-rushers are overloaded to one side. For example, the Jets might place seven defenders on the line of scrimmage (say four to left and three to right).

But when the ball is snapped, three of the four defenders on the left side drop into coverage, while all three defenders on the right side rush. This creates confusion for offenses in pass protection, which results in pass-rushers getting a clear path to the quarterback or being blocked by an overwhelmed running back.

The Jets make great use of a variety of zone exchanges. As our illustration shows, much of the work is done simply with the presnap alignment.

In this alignment, even if three of the four defenders on the left side of the line retreat back into coverage, they still create a pass-rushing advantage for the defense. The very nature of the pre-snap configuration forces the offense to waste blockers on the left side and also creates one-on-one matchups on the right.

Those one-on-one matchups dictate that the running back pick up the outside linebacker, which is a mismatch favoring the defense. On a related note, the running back also has reason to first look left (1. above) immediately after the snap, which makes him a half-beat slower in identifying his actual assignment on the right (2. above).

4. Cowboys Achilles Heal
Pass protection recognition figures to be a bugaboo for the Cowboys – at least early in the season. Two of Dallas’ starting linemen are rookies: first round right tackle Tyron Smith, who, at 20, is the youngest player in the league, and seventh-round left guard Bill Nagy.

What’s more, new center Phil Costa might not be overweight and overpaid like predecessor Andre Gurode, but he’s also not battle-tested. The undrafted second-year pro has played in four games, with just one start that came at left guard. Front line questions are ominous considering Tony Romo has always had some trouble diagnosing blitzes.

The only saving grace in Week 1 is that with Rob Ryan running the Cowboys D, this callow offensive line has had a chance to practice against some of Rex Ryan’s defensive concepts. But we’re still talking about an untested group coming off a shortened offseason and facing one of the most confounding defenses in all of football.

5. A Scintillating Raw Matchup
The ever-fluid Miles Austin figures to be blanketed by Darrelle Revis Sunday night. Thus, the Dez Bryant-Antonio Cromartie matchup takes center stage.

This will be like watching football’s version of a great impromptu dance-off or pickup street ball game. Both players are unrefined but dripping with natural talent and confidence. Bryant’s inexperience figures to limit his route tree; Cromartie’s refusal to use his hands in press coverage drives Jets coaches crazy. But both players have natural game-changing abilities.

So who will win? Check our expert picks for all Week 1 games

Follow @Andy_Benoit on Twitter or contact him at Andy.Benoit-at-NFLTouchdown.com.
Posted on: December 29, 2010 10:08 am
 

McGee could get another chance for Dallas

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

If Cowboys QB Stephen McGee gets the start this Sunday vs. the Eagles – and it sounds like he has a pretty good chance of doing just that – he could continue convincing the Dallas brass that he can be the primary backup to Tony Romo, meaning the team wouldn’t have to spend a 2011 Draft pick on another signal-caller.

The fact McGee performed impressively in last Thursday’s loss at Arizona – despite the defeat, McGee completed 11 of 17 passes for 111 yards and a TD and put his team in position to make the come-from-behind victory after Jon Kitna left the game because of injury – is quite a feat for the former third-string QB.

McGee As the Dallas Morning News points out, McGee had never thrown to Jason Witten before last week – not even in practice – and after taking snaps from rookie Phil Costa in practice, he received the ball from starting C Andre Gurode in Thursday’s game, a difference in delivery point by about four inches.

What surprised me most about McGee was how poised he played vs. the Cardinals. You don’t often see a third-string guy taking his first-ever snaps in the NFL who plays that … well … un-nervously.

"What we liked about him was his demeanor," coach Jason Garrett said. "He didn't really blink. He was, 'OK coach, I got it. I got the calls. I can handle this stuff.' He showed us that, and as the game wore on, he got more comfortable."

One reason for that is because McGee rents a house only two stop signs away from the Cowboys practice facility. That was a conscious decision so he could spend as much time at work as possible.

"Every chance you do get is a huge opportunity," McGee said. "You send that video out to the whole league. Everybody sees it, everybody takes notice. It's basically a résumé for the NFL.”

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed .
Posted on: October 30, 2010 1:21 pm
Edited on: October 30, 2010 1:25 pm
 

Week 8 injury report analysis Part I

Posted by Andy Benoit

Broncos @ 49ers

The Broncos kept LB Wesley Woodyard, LB Robert Ayers, CB Perrish Cox, S Darcel McBath and DE Kevin Vickerson back home in The States for this one. The absence of these five players is a serious blow to Denver’s defensive depth. At least S Brian Dawkins (knee) and CB Andre Goodman (quad) are probable. Both sat out last week’s debacle against Oakland.

Considering both of these teams have a bye next week, is it even worth it for the Broncos to play Dawkins and Goodman this week against a 49ers passing attack that is without starting QB Alex Smith (shoulder) and relying on a somewhat hobbled Vernon Davis (questionable; ankle)?

Because the Broncos love to sling the ball, it’s worth noting that Niners CB Tarell Brown (back) is doubtful and CB Nate Clements (ankle) is probable.

Jaguars @ Cowboys

The Cowboys are likely without Tony Romo for the season, given that the team will almost certainly be eliminated from playoff contention once his shoulder heals. The Jags are getting THEIR quarterback, David Garrard, back after a 1 ½-game absence (concussion). How’s this for freaky: every quarterback that has replaced Garrard at some point this season has goL. Hall (US Presswire)tten injured. Luke McCown blew out his knee working relief duty in Week 1. Trent Edwards dinged his right thumb after Garrard suffered his concussion against the Titans. And now, last week’s starter, Todd Bouman, is questionable with a right finger injury.

Also questionable is Jaguars DE Jeremy Mincey (hand), who was just given the starting job ahead of disappointing former first-round pick Derrick Harvey (who should be listed as questionable each week with an iffy skill set).

Jacksonville’s interior defensive line should step up in this game. The Cowboys are still without left guard Kyle Kosier (ankle) and his backup Montrae Holland (groin). Phil Costa will start for them. Cornerback Terence Newman is expected to play despite sore ribs. Knowing Newman, though, he’ll come out of the game with a false injury scare at least twice.

Dolphins @ Bengals

Not a single player of consequence is listed on Miami’s injury report. For the Bengals, it’s the other way around. Essentially Cincy’s entire secondary is listed as questionable, with the exception of S Roy Williams, who is doubtful (knee), and CB Leon Hall, who is probable (hamstring). Hall missed Wednesday and Thursday’s workout. His counterpart, Johnathan Joseph (ankle), missed Wednesday and most of Thursday. Backup CB Morgan Trent also sat both days. And, oh yeah, nickelback Adam Jones was just placed on IR (neck). Considering the Bengals have next to no pass rush, the injuries in the defensive backfield are an extra major concern.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed .

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com