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Tag:Rod Woodson
Posted on: February 14, 2011 3:13 pm
 

Raiders hire Rod Woodson to coach DBs

tRod Woodson takes over as DB coach in Oakland (Getty). Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Last June, we told you about Rod Woodson’s interest in coaching. He participated in an internship with the Bengals, and he seemed to enjoy impacting young players.

“I’ve got five kids, and I know the commitment coaches have to make,” Woodson told me last summer. “That’s a deterrent at times. But for me to impact the young players’ lives outside of football is huge. You don’t have to be an ex-player to be a good coach, but I like to see a lot of ex-players come back that can give something to the players outside of football.”

Now, he’s going to get his shot.

The Raiders announced today that new coach Hue Jackson has hired Woodson – who already lives in the area – as the team’s defensive backs coach. It’ll be interesting to see how Woodson, a Hall of Fame player, will adapt to relating to the current players in his new role.

More from my June interview with Woodson:

“When the coaches say one thing, players think another,” he said. “Sometimes you have to try to find an even keel. Hopefully, I can try to bridge that gap. I think I’ve been out of the game long enough to know what the coaches really want. I’m trying to tell them what it took for me to get to the next level. That doesn’t really change over the years.”

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Posted on: October 4, 2010 5:38 pm
Edited on: October 4, 2010 6:03 pm
 

Hot Routes 10.4.10: box score tidbits



Posted by Andy Benoit


The Cardinals managed a paltry 124 yards of total offense against the Chargers. And 124 is also only three times the number of points Arizona gave up.

Antonio Gates was targeted seven times. He finished with seven catches for 144 yards and two touchdowns. Those are the type of numbers a player puts up when going up against thin air.

The Chargers defense had nine sacks.

Peyton Manning and Jeff Saturday started their NFL-record 158th game together. (The previous record of 157 was held by Jim Kelly and Kent Hull.)

Donovan McNabb completed just 8/19 passes in his return to Philly. That’s his lowest completion total in a win since his NFL starting debut (which, coincidentally, came against the Redskins).

Santana Moss had zero catches and was targeted just one time.

Quintin Mikell led the Eagles with seven tackles, though none were dynamic enough to make us forget the one he missed (you know, when Ryan Torain plowed over him for a touchdown run).

Arian Foster sat out the first quarter against the Raiders for disciplinary reasons. That allowed Derrick Ward to rise from the dead and finish the day with 12 carries for 80 yards. (Interesting that Steve Slaton wouldn’t get more carries in this instance.) Foster still got his, too. He gained 131 yards on 16 carries, including a sensational 74-yard touchdown.

T. Mays celebrates his TD after he blocked an Atlanta punt (AP). Raiders tight end Zach Miller caught 11 passes for 122 yards and a score. On the other side, Texans backup tight end Joel Dreessen led the team with five catches for 73 yards and a score. (Perhaps the bigger news is that Owen Daniels, in a contract year and coming off a serious knee injury, seems to be assuming a backseat role).

Haloti Ngata had 11 tackles, one sack, two tackles for a loss and two quarterback hits against the Steelers. And yes, in just watching the down-to-down action, Ngata was indeed THAT dominant.

The Saints ran 79 plays Sunday. The Panthers ran 47. The Saints had 27 first downs. The Panthers had 10. (The game was close because the Saints were just 1/5 in the red zone and lost two fumbles.)

Panthers linebacker James Anderson had 16 tackles and a sack.

Saints safety Usama Young played well filling in for an injured Roman Harper. Young led the team with six tackles and recorded a sack and a tackle for a loss.

Seahawks running back Justin Forsett looked much better against the Rams than his 19-carry, 65-yards stat line suggests. Forsett showed great initial quickness and lateral agility between the tackles. Credit the Rams linebackers and defensive backs for keeping him in check.

Seahawks defensive end Chris Clemons had two sacks for the second straight week.

Kyle Orton threw for 341 yards against the Titans. He also attempted 50 passes for the third time this season (the Broncos are 1-2 when he does).

Brandon Lloyd and Eddie Royal both went over 100 receiving yards. It was Lloyd’s third 100-yard game of the season. Denver also had two 100-yard receivers against the Colts (Lloyd and Jabar Gaffney).

Chris Johnson’s longest run against the Broncos went for just eight yards. His backup, Javon Ringer, ripped off a 54-yarder. (To be fair, Ringer was ultimately chased down on that run; Johnson would have taken it to the house.)

Dave Ball had 2.5 of Tennessee’s six sacks of Kyle Orton.

The Lions ran 78 total plays; the Packers ran 40. A week after setting a franchise record with penalties 18 penalties for 152 yards, Green Bay benefitted from 13 Detroit penalties totaling 102 yards.

Charles Woodson recorded his 10th interception return for a touchdown, third most in NFL history. (Rod Woodson holds the record with 12; Sharper is next with 11. Deion Sanders had 9.)

Jordy Nelson lost two fumbles for the Packers. (And the lost fumbles never turned up…we think someone from the Lions may have found them.)

Brandon Pettigrew had a career day, catching eight passes for 91 yards. He’s another guy who has successfully bounced back from a late ’09 ACL injury.

Taylor Mays did not just have a spectacular blocked punt touchdown for the 49ers, he also led the team with 11 tackles. Looks like Michael Lewis won’t be getting his starting job back any time soon.

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Posted on: July 25, 2010 5:16 pm
Edited on: July 25, 2010 7:29 pm
 

Welker's return is nothing short of remarkable

Massachusetts radio station 98.5 The Sports Hub has been told that Wes Welker will be cleared to participate for the first day of training camp. The Boston Globe reported Saturday that Welker, who had surgery on a torn left ACL in January, is healthy and ready to go.

Needless to say, this is nothing short of remarkable. The last big name player to recover so quickly from a torn ACL was Philip Rivers. But there’s a stark difference between Rivers and Welker. Rivers, being a quarterback, plays a stationary brand of football (so to speak). Most of his movement is in the north/south direction. He must plant on his knee, but he rarely has to plant and then move.

A receiver, on the other hand, is required to make frequent east/west movements, with explosive cuts after planting their foot. This is especially true for a catch-and-run magician like Welker.

Steelers Hall of Fame defensive back Rod Woodson came back from an ACL within six months. As a corner, he was required to make those east/west movements. Woodson, however, only had to prime himself for one game (Super Bowl XXX against the Cowboys). The success of Welker’s return will be measured on his effectiveness over a five-to-six-month span. Because of this, expect the Patriots to bring Welker along slowly during training camp.

-- Andy Benoit

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.
Posted on: June 18, 2010 1:26 pm
 

Woodson tries his hand at coaching

CINCINNATI – Rod Woodson is one of the greatest defensive backs in NFL history. He’s an 11-time Pro Bowler – at three different positions, mind you – and he was All-Pro as a CB and a FS. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame last year on the strength of 71 career interceptions – including eight for Oakland when he was 37 years old.

But as great as he was, he found himself this week starting on the bottom rung of the coaching ladder. He was fitted with unfamiliar clothes, and though he received instant respect from anybody that walked within 15 feet of him, he’s a coaching intern and he knows he’s the lowest of the low.

“It doesn’t bother me,” he told CBSSports.com this week. “You have to start somewhere. I came in the league as a rookie, and you were frowned upon as a rookie. I had to work my way up. Hard work for me isn’t a problem. I know a lot of football, but it’s a process of learning how to coach. The players are going to take what they want to take from you. They won’t take everything. As a coach, you have to realize that.”

Woodson spoke with Bengals coach Marvin Lewis in January, and despite working as an analyst for the NFL Network and the Big Ten Network, he said he was ready to give coaching a try. The internship, which began this week for mini-camp and will continue through training camp in July and August, was a way for him to test the waters.

“I’ve got five kids, and I know the commitment coaches have to make,” said Woodson, whose oldest is a sophomore in college and whose youngest is 10. “That’s a deterrent at times. But for me to impact the young players’ lives outside of football is huge. You don’t have to be an ex-player to be a good coach, but I like to see a lot of ex-players come back that can give something to the players outside of football.”

Already, the former Pittsburgh Steelers great is making an impact on the players he’s now coaching.

“You immediately give that guy respect no matter what, just because of his production,” said SS Chinedum Ndukwe. “You can tell in the meeting rooms – he’ll break stuff down for us. He understands the game, and he still knows it. I think he still has the itch. I think if he could still play, he would do it.”

Secondary coach Kevin Coyle introduced his players to Woodson by showing them his stats during a DBs meeting. Immediately, Woodson, though he admitted it was strange to wear Bengals gear, immersed himself into the team.

“Can he be a coach of guys who don’t take it as seriously as he did? Because he took it very seriously,” Lewis said. “That’s the fun part of it. It didn’t take long for him to start coaching out there. He has so much to offer. His notes were like an encyclopedia. He’ll teach people how to learn.”

Woodson’s philosophy is to be a conduit between the players and the coaches.

“Trying to slow the game down and put it in layman’s terms when the coaches are speaking,” Woodson said. “When the coaches say one thing, players think another. Sometimes you have to try to find an even keel. Hopefully, I can try to bridge that gap. I think I’ve been out of the game long enough to know what the coaches really want. I’m trying to tell them what it took for me to get to the next level. That doesn’t really change over the years.”

First, though, Woodson will have to decide if coaching is a vocation he really wants to pursue.

“The only way to do it is to do it,” Lewis said. “He’s going to commit himself to do it. Only thing he can experience is training camp and this. He’ll know. He’ll have a great idea of it.”


--Josh Katzowitz

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter.





Posted on: June 15, 2010 10:10 am
 

The Amazing Wes Welker

Albert Breer of the Boston Globe has a really interesting article on Wes Welker’s recovery from ACL surgery. Welker surprised everyone by cutting and running routes for a few minutes back on June 2. In this article, Rod Woodson and Philip Rivers talk about their own remarkable recoveries from knee operations.

Obviously, it wasn’t as easy as those men made it look. (Woodson, you may recall, tore his ACL in Week 1 of the ’95 season but came back for the Super Bowl; Rivers played with a torn ACL in the ’07 playoffs and, a few months later, was back on the field in Week 1 for the ’08 season. Both men played at a high level after their injuries.)

Here’s an excerpt:

Rivers was told it would take 18 months before his knee would feel normal again and, much as he didn’t want to believe it, that was the truth. He added that a third of his patellar tendon was removed from the front of his knee to create the ACL graft, which brought additional soreness. And he’d feel that, in his calf and quad, doing mundane things such as driving or getting a night’s sleep.
But his ability to block out pain on the field came quicker.

“It took until those preseason games the next year,’’ Rivers said. “Those were important. Even in practice, as much you did, you knew it was protected. In a live deal, it takes some time to where your mind is committed and focused on the game and the defense in front of you. You have to get through it, and realize you’ll be OK.’’

Woodson said it took him about 16 months to stop thinking about the knee completely.

“He’s got to be careful that he doesn’t overcompensate,’’ said Woodson, who made five Pro Bowl teams following the injury. “Maybe his Achilles’ is sore, because he’s running on a leg that’s not fully healed, so something happens. With your Achilles’, your quad, your hamstring, you compensate because you’re not running right.

“I remember my right Achilles’ started hurting, and that bothered me more than the knee did the next season.’’
Ian Rapoport of BostonHerald.com also has a unique piece on Welker, talking about the Hermosa Beach, CA training facility where Welker is rehabbing his knee. The facility is operated by a 5’1” ex-power lifter named Jeremy “Troll” Subin and offers alternative physical and emotional exercises.

--Andy Benoit

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com