Tag:Samson Satele
Posted on: October 19, 2011 3:05 pm
 

Film Room: Raiders vs. Chiefs preview

Posted by Eye on Football Analyst Andy Benoit



Imagine you get sick. You call your girlfriend to tell her that you’re sorry but you’re not going to be able to go with her to the ski resort this weekend. She says that’s no problem, she’ll just go with one of her friends. But when she scrolls through her contacts, she realizes she doesn’t have any friends nearby who are good skiers.

So, she calls to tell you to get well soon and also that she’s going to the ski resort with that guy her cousin knows from the gym. Oh, and the guy and her are moving in together after the trip but can the two of you still be friends? You can’t help but realize that if you’d never gotten sick, your girlfriend would not have started thinking about someone else.

If you can imagine this, then you can imagine how Jason Campbell is probably feeling right now. Let’s examine Jason Campbell’s Carson Palmer’s 4-2 Raiders as they head into their matchup against a Chiefs club that has won two straight coming off its bye but has been rocked by injuries and turmoil.


[Raiders vs. Chiefs PreGame]

1. The Decision
Forty-three million over four years, along with a first-and either first-or-second-round pick in exchange for a quarterback who became inconsistent after a slew of injuries and failed to manage the oversized personalities infiltrating his locker room and huddle in Cincinnati? That’s a steep price – probably too steep, in fact.

But you can understand the Raiders’ logic in going for a potential franchise quarterback. Like the skiing girlfriend, they’re attracted to strong-armed prototypes and are looking for a ring.

The Raiders knew they couldn’t get that ring with Campbell. Caretaking quarterbacks don’t cut it in today’s NFL. Campbell has always been too methodical in his reads and mechanics. He locks onto receivers, which limits what Hue Jackson can do with his gameplans. Campbell is athletic but seems to forget it whenever defenders flash in his face. In short, he has always been exactly what he’ll be when his collarbone heels: a quality backup.
That said, when a team goes all-in like the Raiders have here, they’d better be set in virtually all areas around the quarterback.

So how set are the rest of the Raiders?

2. Pass offense
It’s difficult to gauge Oakland’s passing attack because it has been tailored to hide Campbell’s limitations. But a safe assumption is that with Palmer aboard (whenever he does play), it will become downfield oriented. Darrius Heyward-Bey, Jacoby Ford and Denarius Moore might be the fastest receiving trio in the league. Also, tight end Kevin Boss is not fast, but he’s effective stretching the seams.

Still, speed isn’t everything. The Raiders wideouts all remain raw. Heyward-Bey’s elevated reception total has been partly a function of facing favorable off-coverage. His hands are improved but still not naturally soft. As for Ford, durability and route running can be hit or miss. And Moore? He has done next to nothing since his breakout game at Buffalo.

Still, we’ve seen that (when healthy) these guys can give the Raiders firepower. And because Darren McFadden and fullback Marcel Reese are such dynamic weapons out of the backfield, Hue Jackson can comfortably sacrifice an extra receiver in the formation in order to employ a sixth offensive lineman.

Doing this makes for a better play-action game (a run-oriented team throwing out of a run formation) and also ameliorates right tackle Khalif Barnes’ weakness in pass protection.

3. Run offense
McFadden has blossomed into a legitimate top-five running back. The difference between now and two years ago is he’s staying healthy and has figured out how to get to the perimeter early in the run. That’s important because being such a stiff-hipped, straight-line runner, McFadden doesn’t have the type of agility and lateral burst needed to elude defenders at the line of scrimmage or second level. But he has uncanny speed and acceleration, which, when turned on full blast, make him hard to tackle cleanly.

The Raiders blockers have helped ignite Oakland’s explosive outside run game. Rookie guard Stefan Wisniewski has good movement skills (particularly in short areas) and center Samson Satele has been getting out in front with much greater consistency.

The Raiders also spend a lot of time in six-offensive linemen sets, with the nimble Khalif Barnes serving essentially as a 325-pound blocking tight end. Factor in Michael Bush’s between-the-tackles power and you have the making of a potent, sustainable rushing attack.

4. Defense
When the Raiders don’t surrender big plays they’re tough to trade blows with for four quarters. The defensive line is enormous and athletic, particularly inside where Richard Seymour (future Hall of Famer?) and Tommy Kelly present thundering power augmented by uncommon initial quickness.
The key to creating big plays against Oakland is isolating their linebackers.

Middle linebacker Rolando McClain plays slow (both mentally and physically) and can be exploited. Aaron Curry has only been in town one week, but if his track record from Seattle means anything, he too can be exploited, mainly in space outside the numbers or when forced to cover receivers horizontally. It’s surprising that Curry was handed Quinton Groves' job right away (Groves had been up and down but was getting more comfortable).

The secondary does indeed miss Nnamdi Asomugha, but any secondary would miss Nnamdi Asomugha. Stanford Routt has been adequate on the left side, and the versatile Michael Huff is having the best season of his career. Anytime a team plays predominant man coverage (like the Raiders do), the defensive backs are vulnerable. A pass-rush can help relieve this. The Raiders have great interior rushers but could stand to use a little more speed on the edges.

5. Kansas City’s chances
The question is whether the Chiefs can find some sort of run game without Jamaal Charles. So far, the answer has been no. Don’t expect that to change Sunday; Oakland’s defensive tackles should feast on Kansas City’s struggling interior line.

In the air, teams have been attacking the Raiders defense with play action and rollouts. Matt Cassel has the mobility and arm to make throws on the move (he did so frequently against the Vikings) but that’s usually by circumstance, not design. This is a shotgun passing offense, with success hinging on whether Dwayne Bowe and Steve Breaston can separate from Stanford Routt and DeMarcus Van Dyke (or Chris Johnson or Chimdi Chekwa, should either return from their hamstring injuries).

On the other side of the ball, Tamba Hali is one of the most disruptive players in all the land. He plays with perfect leverage and physically strong quickness in all cardinal directions. The Raiders don’t have anyone who can block him. Hali can’t do it alone, though, which is why Justin Houston needs to play with more decisiveness (tough to ask of a rookie sometimes). Kansas City’s secondary misses Eric Berry but has two physical corners (Brandon Carr and Brandon Flowers) who can compensate, especially against raw wideouts.

Key matchup to watch: Darren McFadden against Derrick Johnson. Speed on speed.

So who will win? Check our NFL expert picks for all Week 7 games

Follow @Andy_Benoit on Twitter or contact him at Andy.Benoit-at-NFLTouchdown.com.
Posted on: September 5, 2010 10:21 am
 

Hot Routes 9.5.10: The day after cut day ...

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

... Which means that the Sunday before the regular season begins should give us a nice respite before the craziness truly begins.

- Cleveland delivered some good news by activating DL Shaun Rogers off the Physically Unable to Play list. Rogers missed the final five games of last season with a leg injury, and he missed the entire Cleveland preseason.

- I feel compelled to bring you this news story, though, in reality, there’s isn’t too much news contained inside. Jets GM Mark Tannenbaum says the team is ready to play without CB Darrelle Revis. Of course, he’d feel a lot better if Revis was actually with his teammates.

- Giants rookie WR Victor Cruz, to whom you were introduced when he caught three TD passes against the Jets in the preseason, said he would cry if he made the team. He did, and he did.

- Wes Welker can play, but he knows he’s not going to be 100 percent when the Patriots open their season. He admits he doesn’t feel the same as last year.

- Jonathan Casillas was placed on the IR list for the Saints with a foot injury, meaning he’ll miss the entire season. You might remember him for recovering the onside kick to open the second half of last season’s Super Bowl.

- In a non-surprising move, the Chiefs shipped S Jarrad Page away from Kansas City in a trade with New England for a draft pick. Page and coach Todd Haley didn’t get along, and ultimately, Page got what he wanted – a ticket out of Missouri. The Kansas City Star’s Kent Babb has some thoughts on his Twitter page.

- Just for the record, Jarrad Page has no hard feelings for Kansas City, writing on his Twitter page, “Jus (sic) wanted to say to the kc fans that stood by me, this was never personal I love kc for giving me a great first 4yrs of my NFL career”

- An interesting story here about the Oakland Raiders Saturday saga with safeties Stevie Brown and Mike Mitchell. Sounds like somebody frigged something up.

- One more Raiders note. Rookie C Jared Veldheer, a 6-foot-8 behemoth, beat out returner starter Samson Satele for the right to snap the football to Jason Campbell.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed .

Posted on: August 26, 2010 8:15 am
Edited on: August 26, 2010 8:18 am
 

Oakland's new center may surprise you

Posted by Andy Benoit
J. Veldheer
Rookie Jared Veldheer, a third-round pick out of tiny Hillsdale College, was drafted to play offensive tackle, (side note: everyone between the ages of 14 and 18 knows Hillsdale as that random college that mails them a brochure every six months). However, with Samson Satele on the mend (ankle), Veldheer, who was extremely raw early on, has an opportunity to “audition” for the starting center job.

Jerry McDonald of the Contra Costa Times writes:

Veldheer worked with the first team at center and will start against the 49ers, essentially auditioning for the starting job with Samson Satele out with an ankle injury.

Good news for Veldheer _ with 49ers nose guard Aubrayo Franklin deciding not to immediately sign his franchise tender, the opposition will be the less imposing Ricky Jean-Francois.


Many assumed Chris Morris was the Raiders’ No. 2 center. Apparently not. 

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com