Play Fantasy Use your Fantasy skills to win Cash Prizes. Join or start a league today. Play Now
 
Tag:Santana Moss
Posted on: December 16, 2011 6:54 pm
Edited on: December 16, 2011 6:57 pm
 

IRS says Santana Moss owes $258,000

S. Moss apparently owes more than $258,000 to the IRS (US Presswire).

By Josh Katzowitz


It’s a good thing Redskins receiver Santana Moss signed a three-year, $15 million contract at the beginning of this year that guaranteed him $6 million. The Internal Revenue Service has made it known that it wants some of that money.

That’s because, according to the Detroit News, the IRS claims Moss owes the agency more than $258,000. The bad news for Moss (besides the fact you don’t EVER want to be on the bad side of the IRS), is that there’s been a tax lien for $258,017 taken out on his property from taxes not paid in 2006 (he also owns this mansion in Lighthouse Point, Fla., apparently bought for $5.2 million).

While Moss has been simply OK this year (37 catches, 453 yards, three touchdowns), he hasn’t always been wise with his money. In June, we told you about a bingo and entertainment operation in Dothan, Ala.,  that ensnared a number of NFL players, including Moss, who invested money into the project. The plans for the center had been shuttled because the developer pleaded guilty to 10 counts of corruption.

As Yahoo’s Jason Cole reported at the time: “I know four players with $7 million in this thing,” said a source closely connected to some of the athletes. “They keep getting told, ‘It’s going to re-open,’ then it gets pushed back again and again. This is a bad situation for a lot of these players.”

Yet, it sounds like Moss has other things to which he must attend first. Like getting the IRS (and the lien it’s placed on his property) off his back as soon as possible.



For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter, Like Us on Facebook, subscribe to our NFL newsletter, and while you're add it, add our RSS Feed.
Posted on: November 14, 2011 3:37 pm
Edited on: November 14, 2011 3:49 pm
 

Rex to start vs Dallas, Hankerson done for year

Posted by Will Brinson



It's only Monday, but we've already got our weekly Redskins quarterback semi-drama out of the way: Rex Grossman will start for Washington when they play the Cowboys in Week 11.

That's according to Mike Shanahan, who didn't hesitate to announce the news at his Monday press conference.

"I was impressed with the way [Rex] played," Shanahan said.

Impressed here is relative, of course, because Grossman wasn't good in the Redskins 20-9 loss to Miami, going 21 of 32 for 215 yards and two picks.

Week 10 Wrapup

But Grossman was more effective than John Beck, who he replaced this past week. Grossman didn't get the win, obviously, and he wasn't necessarily good, but he at least moved the offense and provided some hope that the 'Skins could pull off the upset in Miami.

As did rookie wideout Leonard Hankerson, who flashed some serious potential with an eight-catch, 106-yard effort against the Dolphins.

Unfortunately for the Redskins, Hankerson's season ended Monday with the announcement that he was placed in injured reserve with a torn labrum. Shanahan said the timeline for rehab would be about four months.


Shanahan also said that Santana Moss wouldn't be available against Dallas (though he could be back for the Seattle game), which means the Redskins top-two receiving options against their hated rival will be Jabar Gaffney and the newly-signed David Anderson.

Clearly, things have gone south for Washington since their 3-1 start, and there's no real reason for hope in the near future.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter, subscribe to our NFL newsletter, and while you're add it, add our RSS Feed.
Posted on: October 27, 2011 11:39 am
 

Keep an Eye On: Week 8's finer points of analysis

Posted by Eye on Football Analyst Andy Benoit



Giants vs. Dolphins
One of the more confounding issues with the Dolphins this season has been the decline of their pass-rush. After recording 39 sacks in 2010 (tied for 10th best in the NFL) Miami entered last week’s game against Denver with just eight. They wound up recording seven sacks in the game, but that was in part because of Tim Tebow’s inability to make quick reads or get the ball out.

The Giants’ reshuffled offensive line has been hit or miss in pass protection thus far (more “hit” than “miss”). At Arizona in Week 4, their brilliant protection practically won the game. But the next week it waffled against Seattle’s underrated D-line (Chris Clemons rather enjoyed facing left tackle Will Beatty).

The Dolphins have one of the game’s best all-around edge-rushers in Cameron Wake, the reigning AFC sack leader. His leverage and tenacity give him strength that’s much better than his size indicates. Wake has been oddly quiet in non-two minute situations this season, though he abused Denver’s somewhat lumbering right tackle, Orlando Franklin, last week.

Giants right tackle Kareem McKenzie is more polished than Franklin but has slower feet. He’ll need help. On the other side, Miami may have an under-the-radar pass-rushing talent in Jared Odrick, who somewhat resembles a thicker Jason Taylor.

Ravens vs. Cardinals
The Ravens offense owes everyone a good performance after ruining one of our 17 precious Monday night games. They should be able to get on track against a Cardinals defense that has struggled to generate a consistent pass-rush despite aggressive blitzes from new coordinator Ray Horton.

The intrigue is on the other side of the ball. Roughly two months after the trade and $20-million-plus investment in Kevin Kolb, some Cardinal fans are actually wondering if the 27-year-old quarterback should be benched. That’s the kind of ridiculous thinking that those who don’t actually contribute any skin in the game can get away with. Ken Whisenhunt knows that he’d never get another coaching job if he were to bench Kolb for John Skelton.

Kolb hasn’t been great, but he’s hardly the problem. Arizona’s “non-Fitzgerald” receivers have not been able to get open. General manager Rod Graves may deserve some heat for letting Steve Breaston get away this past offseason, though Graves’ logic was understandable at the time. Third-round rookie Andre Roberts showed intriguing potential as a speedy slasher last season.

Roberts looked like a future starter, and he cost a fraction of what Breaston would have cost. So Graves banked on him. Roberts has responded by failing to reach 40 yards receiving in every game this season. The good-looking prospect prior to Roberts, Early Doucet, has been equally ineffective.

Teams can sometimes get away with having only one quality wide receiver, but not if their offensive tackles stink. And there’s no denying that Levi Brown and Brandon Keith – two heavy-footed lumberers with inconsistent technique – stink.

So far Kolb has been awful when throwing off-balance. It’s doubtful he’ll get to be on balance much against a staunch Ravens D.

Bills vs. Redskins
Don’t pick the Redskins this week. It’s a matter of principle, if nothing else. No team should have expectations placed on it after making a change at quarterback and losing its top wide receiver, running back, tight end, left tackle and left guard in a two-week span. This will look like a preseason version of the Redskins. How will they cope?

It helps that Mike Shanahan’s system runs more fluidly with John Beck than it does with Rex Grossman. Beck is smoother reading the field and much better at play-action rollouts and bootlegs than Grossman. Accuracy is a bit of a concern, however. As for the other injuries and replacement ...

RB Tim Hightower (knee – out for season) had found his niche in this zone-run scheme, but he’ll be missed most in the passing game. Ryan Torain is a decent upright power-runner with a spring in his step, but he can’t stick pass-rushers the way Hightower could.

WR Santana Moss (hand – out 5-7 weeks) was Washington’s only creator on offense. He could generate his own space and turn an underneath catch into a 60-yard scamper. Either Niles Paul or Anthony Armstrong will replace him. Both have flashed at times, but neither is completely trustworthy. And, unlike with Moss, defenses won’t have to even ponder the possibility of double coverage.

TE Chris Cooley (finger, knee – out for season) was trending down and losing his role to Fred Davis prior to get hurting. Davis can fill Cooley’s receiving shoes. But the Redskins are now down a good in-line blocker in the run game. With Cooley and Davis, Washington had the benefit of balancing its formation with a viable pass-catching tight end on each side. This often compelled defenses to stay in basic front seven looks. New backup tight end Logan Paulsen won’t command that kind of respect.

LT Trent Williams (high ankle sprain – out 0-4 weeks) has missed most of the last two games. Pretty easy to identify the impact of his absence: backup Sean Locklear is experienced but much slower than Williams all-around.

LG Kory Lichtensteiger (knee – out for season) was one of the unheralded heroes for this team down the stretch last year and prior to going down in Week 6. Center Will Montgomery moved one spot to the left to fill Lichtensteiger’s void. Montgomery is interchangeable that way, but his replacement in the middle, Erik Cook, a seventh-round pick in ’10, was a noticeable downgrade coming off the bench. He had issues snapping the ball and was overwhelmed by defensive tackle Mike Peterson on a few plays. The Redskins can only hope those were Cook’s jitters working themselves out.

So who will win? Check our NFL expert picks for all Week 8 games

Follow @Andy_Benoit on Twitter or contact him at Andy.Benoit-at-NFLTouchdown.com.
Posted on: September 8, 2011 4:58 pm
Edited on: September 8, 2011 5:09 pm
 

Film Room: Bears vs. Falcons preview

Posted by Eye on Football Analyst Andy Benoit



On paper, the top two seeds from last season’s NFC playoffs are both improved heading into 2011. Consequently, the Atlanta Falcons have become somewhat of a trendy Super Bowl pick. But the Chicago Bears? They’re the team most are picking to finish right behind Detroit in the NFC North. In analyzing five key threads these teams share, we might understand why.

1. Receiver Infusion
Thomas Dimitroff realized that Atlanta’s offense was a playmaker short of being nearly unstoppable. So, the fourth-year general manager traded five premium draft picks to move up and select Alabama wideout Julio Jones sixth overall.

Jones is a great fit because he’s not only a dynamic downfield threat who also has the thickness to go inside, but thanks to his days in the Crimson Tide’s black-and-blue offense, he’s also a savvy downfield blocker. That’s important, as Falcons offensive coordinator Mike Mularkey has always had a predilection for power runs out of two tight-end/two back formations.

In Chicago, with a system built around downfield routes out of three-and four-receiver formations, offensive coordinator Mike Martz needed more firepower outside. Instead of reaching for an unproven wideout late in the first round, overpaying for free agents Santana Moss or Santonio Holmes or taking a risk on Braylon Edwards (attitude) or Plaxico Burress (rustiness), the Bears acquired  Roy Williams after his star fully plummeted in Dallas.

Williams, a straight-line runner with big hands and feet, was never a good fit for the Cowboys’ shifty catch-and-run oriented system. But in the 28 games he played for Martz in Detroit, Williams produced 2,148 yards receiving. However, whatever optimism the Detroit success instilled was likely blown away by Williams’ dropped passes and admission to being out of shape this past August (candor has always been his Achilles heel).

Because the Bears refuse to admit that Devin Hester is merely a return specialist with modest slot receiving ability (i.e. NOT a starter), it was rising third-year pro Johnny Knox whom Williams supplanted in the lineup. Knox, who has superb speed and quickness and excellent chemistry with Jay Cutler, particularly in deciphering zone coverages, is eager to recapture his starting job (and thus, his leverage for a new contract in the near future). He will, if Williams continues to struggle. And the Bears’ passing game will essentially be right back in the same place it was a year ago.

The Falcons figure to clearly have an improved pass attack. The Bears are TBD.

2. Big meaty offensive lines
To put it politely, Atlanta’s and Chicago’s offensive lines both feature more size than athleticism. The lunch pail approach has worked great for the Falcons. They have a straightforward power-run offense that’s conducive to forming good chemistry up front. In the passing game (where a line’s athletic limitations get exposed), the Falcons rarely use more than three wide receivers, which makes an extra tight end or running back available to stay in and block. In short, the Falcons can bend their system for their offensive line.
 
The Bears, on the other hand, are more inclined to bend (or break) their offensive line for their system. Martz frequently has Cutler take seven-step drops, which only gives heavy-footed offensive tackle J’Marcus Webb, laterally stiff guard Chris Williams and the rest of the front more time to get beat in pass protection. Also, with the running back often being an important receiving option in Martz’s system, Bears linemen must shoulder more responsibility in blitz identification and pickup – an area in which they’ve struggled.

Hence, the 52 times Cutler was sacked last season.

3. The traditional  4-3 defense: evolve vs. resolve
Mike Smith was a classic zone-based 4-3 defensive coordinator in Jacksonville. But over his three seasons in Atlanta, he’s drifted away from vanilla Cover 2 tactics and towards more diverse blitzes and zone exchanges. Impressive considering he employs these tactics out of traditional base and nickel sets.
 
Lovie Smith was a classic zone-based 4-3 defensive coordinator in St. Louis. Over his seven years in Chicago, he’s ... remained a proponent of classic 4-3 zone-based defense.

The Bears are the only team that virtually still runs a fulltime strict Cover 2. They’ve made it work largely because they have two perfect linebackers for this scheme in Brian Urlacher and Lance Briggs. But as we’ll explore more in-depth another week, there are significant vulnerabilities to a Cover 2. Those vulnerabilities are why Smith and the Falcons have chosen to evolve.

4. The No. 2 defensive end
Arguably the best two defensive ends in the NFC are Julius Peppers and John Abraham. Both have devastating explosiveness off the edge and both can play the run (Peppers is by far the NFL’s best all-around run-stopping 4-3 end; Abraham is more finesse-oriented but is still underrated as a backside chaser).

What the Falcons learned last season is a pass-rush is incomplete without a second outside presence. Kroy Biermann is a very active run-defender, but he registered just three sacks in his debut season as a starter. So, Thomas Dimitroff spent $11 million (guaranteed) on free agent Ray Edwards, who each of the past two years in Minnesota posted at least eight sacks against frequent one-on-one blocking opposite Jared Allen. Edwards is also an adept all-around run-defender.

The Bears have a stalwart No. 2 pass-rusher of their own in Israel Idonije. Versatile enough to line up inside or outside, the ninth-year veteran tied Peppers for the team lead in sacks last season (eight). Idonije does not quite have Edwards’ quickness around the corner, but he’s one of the best in the league at executing stunts.

5. Safeties
Over the years, watching the Bears try out different young safeties in the starting lineup has been like watching Gilbert Brown try on outfits that don’t make him look fat. The Bears drafted Danieal Manning in ’06; Kevin Payne in ’07; Craig Steltz in ’08; Al Afalava in ’09; Major Wright in ’10 and Chris Conte in ’11.

All, with the exception of Conte, were given a shot at starting. And, assuming that newly signed Brandon Meriweather soon supplants Wright as the current first-string free safety, all were ultimately deemed unqualified.

The Falcons have taken a flier with young safeties, as well. The difference is theirs have succeeded. Thomas DeCoud, a third-round pick in ’08, started all 16 games each of the past two seasons. His instincts in coverage have improved and he’s a fast, firm open-field tackler.

His running mate, William Moore, a second-round pick in ’09, stayed healthy for the first time last season and showed genuine game-changing potential over 15 starts. Moore’s a fierce hitter who is developing in pass defense quicker than expected.

So who will win? Check out the video below. And see who our experts pick for all the Week 1 games


Read Andy's Film Room breakdown of Jets-Cowboys.

Follow @Andy_Benoit on Twitter and contact him at Andy.Benoit-at-NFLTouchdown.com.
Posted on: July 26, 2011 6:32 pm
 

Report: Santana Moss agrees to $15 million deal

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

He’s losing last year’s starting quarterback (possibly to Minnesota), and for now, he’ll take passes from either John Beck or Rex Grossman. Yet, Redskins WR Santana Moss has to be happy with his current situation.

MossThat’s because, as ESPN’s Adam Schefter writes, Moss has reached an agreement on a three-year deal worth $15 million with a $5 million signing bonus and $6 million guaranteed.

Moss had a strong season last year, catching 93 passes, but as CBSSports.com’s Pete Prisco pointed out in his top-50 free agents piece (Moss was No. 47), he really isn’t a No. 1 WR anymore.

Moss, considering he finished third in the league in receptions last year, might disagree with that assessment.

And now he has a pretty rich contract to prove his point.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.

Posted on: July 13, 2011 11:58 pm
Edited on: July 14, 2011 12:21 am
 

Redskins will be busy in free agency

ShanahanPosted by Josh Katzowitz

The Redskins weren’t big-time players in free agency last offseason -- though they did make a pretty big-time trade for Donovan McNabb, which didn’t exactly, um, work out for anybody -- but NFL.com’s Jason LaCanfora writes that the previous attitude will change once the lockout ends.

Apparently, the primary objective for coach Mike Shanahan is to sign wide receiver Santonio Holmes, though you can be sure the Jets will put up a fight for him, while players like Ravens G Marshall Yanda, Packers DL Cullen Jenkins and Jets DL Kris Jenkins also are wanted by the Redskins.

LaCanfora writes that the team very well could land the Jenkins brothers, because neither will be as in demand as Holmes and Yanda.

If the Redskins were to sign Holmes, there’s a decent chance that WR Santana Moss -- who’s been in Washington for the past six seasons -- would not return (though he has stated that he wants to stay with the Redskins).

Not surprisingly, the team doesn’t plan to keep McNabb or DL/troublemaker Albert Haynesworth. Washington most likely will release McNabb once the lockout is over. But the Redskins still will want to find somebody who will take Haynesworth in a trade, in part because they don’t want Haynesworth to get his way and in part because they want to control where Haynesworth plays next year (ie. not anywhere in the NFC East).

But as LaCanfora writes, this will be a big offseason for Shanahan, because he “already has fallen under scrutiny following clashes with top players and acute struggles on both offense and defense during his first season in Washington.”

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.

Posted on: July 13, 2011 12:09 am
 

Plax says Bears in top 3, Bears not interested?

Posted by Will Brinson

Plaxico Burress will be one of the most sought-after discussed free agents once the offseason begins. And though his age may be an issue, it seems like he's going to get a gig.

But where? Well, how about Chicago, where the Bears are in need of a possession receiver to compliment Devin Hester? How convenient -- Plaxico said he'd be interested in going to Chicago, even calling the Bears one of his top-three choices to play.

"Oh without question, without a doubt [the Bears are among my top three destinations]," Burress said on "The Carmen, Jurko & Harry Show" on Tuesday, via the Chicago Sun-Times. "My decision making is going to come down to what I said, playing with an elite quarterback, playing with a running game, playing with a great tight end, and Greg Olsen is already that guy, in my estimation he'll be a Pro Bowler this season.

"That's the same situation I went into when I made my decision to go to New York. It's a pretty similar situation."

Quick aside: it's unbelievable how Drew Rosenhaus clients who don't really have an open market continually find themselves in high-demand. I mean that seriously -- the guy makes things happen.

However, this flirtation with Chicago may not exactly be worth pursuing. Sean Jensen of the Sun-Times notes in the same article that multiple sources tell him the Bears are only interested in Plax at a "bargain basement price."

Apparently, the combination of Burress' prison time, plus his age and character concerns all mesh poorly with his inability to fit into Mike Martz' scheme that way other receivers might.

But, hey, what if he ended up going to Chicago along with Washington wideout Santana Moss? That would make for a pretty spicy set of wide receivers, right?

Yes it would, but it probably won't happen. If there's one thing we've learned about Rosenhaus clients it's that they're probably not taking the cheapest deal on the market, even if it might mean a better situation.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.
Posted on: July 12, 2011 6:23 pm
Edited on: July 12, 2011 6:40 pm
 

Hester wants Bears to sign Santana Moss

Posted by Will Brinson

For as amazing as Devin Hester's been as a returner during his career with the Bears, he's never quite worked out as a receiver. He's had his moments, of course, but it's usually been a lack of a decent quarterback or another receiver on the field that's kept him from maxing his big-play potential.

Which is probably why he wants the Bears to go out and sign Santana Moss once free agency starts up.

"Anybody that can come in and help out the team, I’m down for it, and a guy like [Moss] can come in and really help out a lot," Hester said, per the Chicago Tribune. "I’m hoping we can get him."

That might seem simple -- "Hey, Bears, go spend money!" -- but it could be a little tougher to pry Moss away from the Redskins.

See, even though he's a free agent, he has stated that he'd like to come back to Washington, although his reasoning seems predicated on his preference to not negotiate a contract.

If he's willing to be swayed, though, certainly Chicago offers a better situation: Hester (a fellow former Miami Hurricane) on the other side will force teams to play off him more than anyone in Washington, and Jay Cutler's far better than the three-headed monster that is Donovan McNabb/Rex Grossman/John Beck.

But, hey, to each his own -- if Moss really wants to hang around and kick it with the Shanahans, more power to him.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com