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Tag:Tank Johnson
Posted on: April 19, 2011 2:12 pm
Edited on: April 19, 2011 11:30 pm
 

Offseason Checkup: Cincinnati Bengals

Posted by Andy Benoit



Eye on Football's playing doctor for every NFL team with our Offseason Check-ups.



After the Bengals fell behind the eight-ball with a devastating turnover-infused loss to the Bucs in Week 5, they went into their bye a lowly 2-3 and searching the depths of their character for answers.

Problem was, the depths of their character included the collective souls of Terrell Owens, Chad Ochocinco, Pacman Jones, Rey Maualuga, Tank Johnson, Cedric Benson, Michael Johnson, Andre Smith, Carlos Dunlap, Frostee Rucker, Jonathan Joseph, Leon Hall and whatever other players on the roster who, at one point or another, have raised the red character flag.

None of these guys were individually heinous in 2010 (save for Owens), but collectively, they created a staggering void in the leadership department.




Offensive scheme

Bob Bratkowski is out as offensive coordinator, and deservedly so. In terms of complexity and sophistication, the Bengals’ system in 2010 was comparable to that of a really sophisticated Pop Warner team’s.

The receivers’ route combinations rarely worked off one another, making them easy to defend. The play-action game was non-existent, which was fitting because the run game was an afterthought.

Which brings us to the change: more power runs under new coordinator Jay Gruden. Expect Cedric Benson to re-sign and get about 25 carries a game. Not only is he best suited to be a bell cow, but the Bengals powerful but heavy-footed offensive line is best suited to play downhill, rather than in the frequent drop steps of pass protection.




1. Quarterback
Carson Palmer insists he’s retiring if the team doesn’t trade him. Owner Mike Brown may be great at playing hardball, but it would take a hardhead to keep Palmer around at this point. Besides, Palmer’s skills have declined (though not as much as you’d probably guess) and he clearly doesn’t trust his offensive line or receivers.

2. Pass Rusher
This need is almost as glaring as the potential need at quarterback. Antwan Odom has not been the same since injuring his Achilles. Robert Geathers was never the same after blowing out his knee. (Unfortunately for the front office, both players were inked to long-term deals before their injuries.) Athletic ex-Gator Carlos Dunlap earned some high marks as a second-round rookie last season, but equally as prominent were his low marks.

3. Interior Offensive Lineman
Right guard Bobbie Williams is aging. Left guard Nate Livings is the definition of average. Or maybe center Kyle Cook is. Whatever; the Bengals need more athleticism inside up front.




A healthy goal for the Bengals would be to regain respect. Self respect, that is. Individually, the Bengals are more athletically gifted than a lot of teams.

But their athletes have not lived up to potential or played well together. Ushering in a new wave of leadership would plant some positive seeds moving forward.

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Posted on: November 20, 2010 2:13 pm
 

Week 11 injury report analysis Part I

Posted by Andy Benoit

Ravens @ Panthers
M. Schaub (US Presswire)
Ravens guard Chris Chester is questionable with a skin infection. If he’s unable to go, utility backup Tony Moll would fill-in. That would be a downgrade in terms of run-blocking mobility, though Baltimore would survive.

The Panthers are without pretty much any offensive player worth watching. QB Jimmy Clausen is out (concussion). RB Jonathan Stewart is also concussed and won’t play. Same goes for rookie WR Brandon LaFell. RB DeAngelo Williams is done for the season with a foot injury. With backup RB Tyrell Sutton also out (ankle), the run game will fall on the shoulders of Mike Goodson. Against this Ravens defense it will be tough for the second-year pro to match his 100-yard output of a week ago.

Texans @ Jets

Matt Schaub is expected to play after being hospitalized midweek with a bursa sac problem. Schaub won’t have Owen Daniels (hamstring) to throw to, though.

The Jets are in a similar situation. QB Mark Sanchez (calf) was less than 100 percent all week but will play. But he won’t have arguably his favorite inside target, WR Jerricho Cotchery (groin). Expect TE Dustin Keller to play a more prominent role, especially given that Houston has no safeties who are adept in coverage and two linebackers who are questionable (Zach Diles, illness; Xavier Adibi, hamstring).

The only other injury of note here is Jets cornerback Dwight Lowery, who is out with a head injury.

Bills @ Bengals

No C.J. Spiller (hamstring) for the Bills, which means they’ll have to find someone else to dance along the outside running lanes and distrust the run-blocking. Hamstring injuries struck Buffalo’s defensive line, with Spencer Johnson out and Kyle Williams having been limited in practice this week.

The Bengals could list half their team as questionable with a bad attitude, but that would only be an admission of their failed personnel moves. Thus, they’ll stick to listing traditional injuries. Included in those injuries are both starting defensive ends being on the shelf (Antwan Odom, wrist; Jonathan Fanene, hamstring), backup DE Frostee Rucker likely joining them (knee, no practice all week) and DT Tank Johnson very doubtful with a bum knee. Slot CB Morgan Trent also has a bum knee and won’t play. If that’s not enough, LB Rey Maualuga (thigh) and S Chris Crocker (calf) were limited in practice and are both questionable.

Of course, we’re talking about two teams with a combined three wins, so really, besides Bills’ and Bengals’ friends and family, is anyone really that concerned about who takes the field Sunday?

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Posted on: July 27, 2010 9:24 pm
 

Bengals organization reacts to T.O. signing

T. Owens is set to join his new Cincinnati teammates at training camp Thursday (Getty). Chris Crocker doesn’t sugarcoat his comments. If he has a problem with somebody and a reporter asks him about it, he’ll say whatever comes to mind. He’s a reporter’s dream, because he doesn’t use a filter to water down his opinions. You never have to go off the record with the Bengals free safety.

After reports surfaced that Terrell Owens and the Bengals had reached an agreement on a one-year contract that will pay him a $2 million base salary and could give him as much as $2 million in roster bonuses, I wanted to touch base with Crocker. I knew if Crocker was unsure about his newest teammate – be it because Owens has lost some of his elite play-making ability or because Owens still has a crappy reputation – he’d let it be known.

I’d already raised my confusion about why Cincinnati would sign Owens, but to Crocker, it was clear. And not only does Crocker not have a problem with Owens joining the squad, he’s really, really excited about it.

“I think it’s great,” Crocker said. “It just shows we’re trying to do everything, and it will add another piece to get us to the Super Bowl in Dallas in February. We have so many other guys on the team that have had question marks beside them as far as character is concerned, but our locker room is as strong as it gets. If T.O. is half of the player he was before he went to Buffalo, that’s going to be a great thing for us.”

The Bengals, as has been well documented, have become a paradise for players needing second and third chances. The term “Betty Ford Clinic for the NFL” has been bandied about quite often. Cedric Benson needed another chance. Chris Henry needed one. Larry Johnson needed one. Tank Johnson, Adam Jones, Matt Jones, Dezmon Briscoe, they all needed one. The list goes on to ridiculous lengths.

But in the past couple seasons, the questionable character signings haven’t affected the team chemistry.

“There’s one common goal, and there’s not one person or one man who can divide our locker room,” Crocker said. “That’s to get to the Super Bowl. There’s enough strong personalities and we have enough strong leadership that we won’t allow a bunch of dissension. As long as you’re a good person and willing to show you’ll do right, that’s all that matters.

“There are enough guys in the locker room where we police each other. Everybody has egos and strong personalities but we have guys who know how to take somebody to the side and talk to them about what’s going on. We don’t let things go. We handle issues in house and we take care of it and move on.”

I still wonder, though. How will the Bengals split touches between Ochocinco, Bryant, Owens, Benson, first-round pick TE Jermaine Gresham and everybody else on the roster?

“That’s a good problem to have,” said Dave Lapham, former Bengals OL and the team’s radio color commentator. “It’s going to have to be a case of unselfishness. You can’t double-team everybody. It’s kind of like pick your poison. It’s always better to have that problem than not have any weapons at all. But it’ll be interesting halfway through this season if T.O. is tracking low and not on track to make his incentives. Will he get in Carson’s face? That will be interesting to monitor."

Not everyone was so impressed with the Bengals signing. Browns CB Brandon McDonald wrote on his Twitter page in what only could be considered a classy status update: “TO to da Bengals huh??? Yessss, another piece of (fill in the blank here) fa da Browns secondary to run a train on...”

But if you discount the words of a player whose teams have gone 9-23 the past two years, it still seems like it’ll tough for everybody to get along, especially if Chad Ochocinco or Owens or Antonio Bryant aren’t getting the desired number of passes Carson Palmer throws their way.

“At the end of the day day, Carson controls who gets the ball,” Crocker said. “He’s going to throw the ball to whoever is open. He’s not going to play favorites. We don’t play favorites on this team. Chad is always open. From his standpoint, he’s always open and he’s always going to bitch if he doesn't get the ball. That’s what receivers do. But I know T.O. is going to come in and make plays. I’m excited, I really am. It’s going to be a hell of a year.”

--Josh Katzowitz

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com