Tag:Tom Cable
Posted on: January 24, 2012 8:43 pm
Edited on: January 25, 2012 7:03 am
  •  
 

Raiders hire Broncos DC Dennis Allen

Bruce Allen has been hired to be Oakland's next coach (US Presswire).

By Josh Katzowitz


Dennis Allen, the former defensive coordinator of the Broncos, has been hired to be the next Raiders head coach, CBSSports.com's Mike Freeman has confirmed (the news was originally reported by Fox’s Jay Glazer).

Reports out of Oakland suggested Allen had done well in his two interviews with the Oakland front office and that early favorite Winston Moss, the Packers assistant head coach, had not.

Latest Coaching News, Rumors

In his only season as the head of Denver’s defense, he helped lead a unit that propped up quarterback Tim Tebow for the last half of the season and allowed the Broncos to win the AFC West and beat the Steelers in the first round of the postseason.

Glazer writes that the two sides still have to negotiate a deal, but with Allen, the Raiders will get a coach whose defense finished in the bottom half of the league standings but who was lauded for the improvements his unit made in the final half of the season.

Although Moss -- who knows new Raiders general manager Reggie McKenzie quite well from their days together in Green Bay, leading to the speculation that he had a good chance of landing the job -- seemingly fell out of favor during the interviewing process, Eagles offensive coordinator Marty Mornhinweg reportedly had a good shot at landing the job.

The Raiders also interviewed Bears offensive coordinator Mike Tice and former Dolphins defensive coordinator Todd Bowles, while Broncos offensive coordinator Mike McCoy declined his chance to interview.

Considering former owner Al Davis was such a big proponent of hiring offensive-minded coaches (see: Hue Jackson, Tom Cable, Lane Kiffin, Art Shell, Norv Turner, Bill Callahan, Jon Gruden, etc.), seeing a defensive-minded coach hired is an interesting concept.

It shows that Mark Davis, Al Davis’ son who is now in charge, will take a different tact than this father. Only time will tell whether this new path is the beginning of a Raiders resurgence or if Al Davis had the right idea the whole time.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter, Like Us on Facebook, subscribe to our NFL newsletter, and while you're add it, add our RSS Feed.

Posted on: August 27, 2011 12:07 pm
Edited on: August 27, 2011 12:07 pm
 

Comparing and contrasting Pryor and Mallett

PryorPosted by Josh Katzowitz

Rookie quarterbacks Ryan Mallett and Terrelle Pryor are not so dissimilar. Both were third round draft picks -- Mallett last April and Pryor in the supplemental draft -- and both come to the NFL with character marks that have been branded on them by a lack of discipline.

Yahoo Sports’ Jason Cole compares the two and tries to explain why they will or will not succeed with the team that drafted them.

And while we’ve already discussed how these two players will affect their teams as rookies, Cole presents some interesting theories.

Yeah, it doesn’t take a soothsayer to predict that Pryor might be in trouble now that the Raiders have their paws on him, but Cole writes that Pryor’s biggest career problem is that nobody has had the audacity to tell him no. Not in high school and not former Ohio State coach Jim Tressel.

While Raiders coach Hue Jackson will try to make his mark on Pryor, it’s also documented that Oakland owner Al Davis doesn’t exactly back up his coaches when it comes to disciplining his players. Writes Cole: “Davis picked [JaMarcus] Russell, seeing him as the second-coming of [Jim] Plunkett from an athletic perspective. Davis then let Russell run wild over coaches Lane Kiffin and Tom Cable. Those coaches tried to discipline Russell from time to time, but Davis either waived the fines or didn’t do anything until it was way too late.”

And we all know where Russell is these days (well, actually we don’t, which is kind of the point).

R. Mallett is adjusting to his new surroundings in New England (Getty).Patriots coach Bill Belichick doesn’t have a problem letting his players know the way he wants things done, which means Mallett will have to adjust. And Cole has another interesting tidbit about all the partying Mallett is alleged to have done before training camp began. Writes Cole: “Aside from the sordid tales of him from college, the latest story about him was the all-night partying he did at the NFL Players Association rookie symposium in Sarasota, Fla., in July, according to two sources.”

Which probably isn’t a good idea, especially if the biggest predraft concern by teams -- and probably the reason he slipped to the third round -- was because of his off-the-field behaviors.

You can’t be stupid and play quarterback in the NFL, and right now, the jury is still out on how much sense Mallett has in his brain.

So, aside from what round they were drafted and the concerns about their character, you have to wonder how we’ll be discussing Pryor and Mallett five years from now. Obviously, there’s now way to tell, but if we’re discussing which of the quarterbacks has a better chance to succeed on where he was drafted, you’d have to give the nod to Mallett at this point.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.
Posted on: March 25, 2011 12:07 pm
Edited on: March 27, 2011 12:49 am
 

Offseason Checkup: Seattle Seahawks

Posted by Josh Katzowitz



Eye on Football's playing doctor for every NFL team with our Offseason Check-ups . Also, check out our checkup podcast:





The Seahawks were subjected to much ridicule when they became the first team in playoff history to enter with a losing record (for that, we can thank the incredibly weak NFC West – not to mention the Rams, who fell to the Seahawks in Week 17 in a game that would have allowed St. Louis to win the division with an 8-8 mark).

But then, Seattle immediately thumbed its nose – and indirectly taunted the Giants and Buccaneers, both of whom missed the playoffs with 10-6 records – at the NFL by beating New Orleans (we can talk all day about how Seattle had an unfair advantage by getting to host an 11-5 team, but Seattle outclassed the Saints big time).

Seattle was a weird team to observe last season. The Seahawks were either pretty good (wins against the Chargers and the Bears attest to that), or they were absolutely horrid (remember the 33-3 loss to the Raiders and the 41-7 defeat to the Giants in consecutive weeks?). I never really got a handle on which Seattle team was going to show up each week, and I still couldn’t tell you whether the Seahawks were a good team last year. I kind of lean toward no, though.




Future franchise QB, Too much change

Matt Hasselbeck could return for another season, and honestly, that wouldn’t be a terrible decision, because he was decent enough last year for a 35-year-old quarterback. But his backup Charlie Whitehurst – who the Seahawks traded for last season – simply has not proved he’s a quality starter, and while third-stringer J.P. Losman started in Buffalo, there’s a pretty good reason he’s not doing it there anymore.

It seemed like coach Pete Carroll has turned over the roster about 15 times since he took over as head coach, and he’s lost a few assistants. At some point, there needs to be some roster and staff consistency, doesn’t there?



1. Franchise QB
Could Philadelphia’s Kevin Kolb be that quarterback? The Seahawks would have to give up, at the very least, a first-round draft pick (and probably a mid-round pick as well) in order to trade the Eagles, but Kolb could very well be the guy to replace Hasselbeck. Emphasis on the word “could” because Kolb, as far as I’m concerned, still has much to prove as a starting QB. And if Seattle doesn’t get Kolb (and can’t re-sign the unrestricted free agent Hasselbeck), what the heck happen

2. Offensive consistency
wks fired offensive coordinator Jeremy Bates after just one season, probably because they averaged less than 300 yards of total offense per game and perhaps because they thought they could get Josh McDaniels to take that job. Instead, they hired former Vikings offensive coordinator Darren Bevell to replace Bates and former 49ers head coach Tom Cable as the OL coach. Maybe that will work. And if not, Carroll won’t have a problem looking for a replacement.

3. Cornerback help
Seattle allowed 11 passes of 40-plus yards last year, and though that wasn’t necessarily always the fault of the 30-year-old Marcus Trufant and the underwhelming Kelly Jennings, it wouldn’t be a surprise if Seattle takes a defensive back in the first round of the draft. The top-two CBs in the draft (Prince Amukamara and Patrick Patterson) surely won’t be around by the time the Seahawks pick at No. 25, but Colorado’s Jimmy Smith is a definite possibility.




For a playoff team, the Seahawks have soooooo much room to improve. RB Marshawn Lynch (who, you’ll recall, did this against the Saints) was serviceable after landing in the Pacific Northwest, and Seattle signed WR Mike Williams to a three-year extension near the end of the season. But the offensive line needs help (the team has used 15 (!) players on the left side of the line in the past three years), and the Seahawks could forgo a cornerback and draft a lineman in the first round.

That said, remember the Seahawks play in the weakest division in football. So, you could mark them down as favorites to win the NFC West, and you actually have a pretty good chance of being correct. But this team, like last year’s squad, could be very flawed. And it might not be very good.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed
Posted on: March 17, 2011 2:06 pm
Edited on: March 20, 2011 3:03 pm
 

Offseason Checkup: Oakland Raiders

Posted by Will Brinson



Eye on Football's playing doctor for every NFL team with our Offseason Check-ups. Also, check out our checkup podcast:


For every single team in NFL history, sweeping the division has resulted in a playoff spot. As it should -- that’s six wins and an incredible headstart on the postseason race.

Then the 2010 Raiders came along.

They won all six of their division games and yet still somehow managed to go 2-8 in the remaining contests on their schedule. That resulted in Tom Cable’s firing and a lot of angry confusion in the Bay Area.

A much worse trait’s percolating around the Black Hole though: cautious optimism. Since Oakland’s fall from grace following their 2002 Super Bowl loss to the Bucs, Oakland hasn’t just been a lost cause. They’ve been the poster child for bad management.

2010 didn’t change that, but Raiders fans will probably try and tell you otherwise. Hue Jackson moving from offensive coordinator to head coach will give Jason Campbell some much-needed stability, and it should bode well for both the continued improvement of Darren McFadden and Oakland’s stockpile of burners at the wide receiver position.

But personnel losses on the other side of the ball -- Nnamdi Asomugha, mainly -- and a focus on scoring points might not exactly guarantee any more success in 2011.


Delusion, Stopping the Run

Part of the Raiders second-ranked passing defense was Asomugha’s ability to shut down half of the field. But part of it was also their inability to stop opposing offenses from piling up yardage on the ground; running backs averaged 133.6 yards per game (and 4.5 yards per carry) against Oakland.

That was good for 29th in the NFL and it’s pretty clear that “losing games” and “not stopping the run” go hand-in-hand. Chris Johnson (142 yards), Arian Foster (131), Frank Gore (149), Ricky Williams (95), Rashard Jennings (109) and even Dominic Rhodes (98) all put up pretty big numbers when Oakland lost.

Oddly, not once in a Raiders’ win did an opposing back tote the ball more than 20 times. Many times -- though not always -- that was because Oakland jumped out to big leads early.

And it’s possible that Jackson can continue that trend into 2011, but improved defense against the rush will avoid the need to make big and sometimes luck-driven leads a requirement.


1. Secondary
Stanford Routt’s the new No. 1 in Oaktown with Asomugha now departing to, um, somewhere. (We don’t know where yet, but he’s probably not coming back to Oakland.) Routt and Chris Johnson can work well together, but there’s a pretty good chance that losing Nnamdi will expose other areas in the secondary as teams work the entire field against Oakland. It’ll also stretch their safeties even thinner than before, something that could become a problem if Michael Huff and Tyvon Branch can’t step up their game.

2. Front Office Contract Guy
No, but seriously -- the fact that Asomugha and Kamerion Wimbley somehow BOTH managed to end up with funky as all get-out finales to their contracts is pretty indicative that something ain’t stirring the Kool-Aid in the front office when it comes to the guy who draws up the deals. Either that or Oakland really wanted to dump Nnamdi this offseason. Which makes less sense than accidentally messing up a pair of big-time contracts.

3. Outside linebacker
Branch and Huff were the leading tacklers for Oakland in 2010, which is good, because tackles are nice. It’s bad because it means that teams were pretty easily getting to the furthest layer of the Raiders’ defense. Letting people break big plays (the Raiders allowed 17 rushes over 20 yards, third-worst in the league, and 51 passes over 20 yards, 11th worst) was a nasty little problem for Oakland last year. And even with "franchise" player Wimbley sitting on the outside, Oakland needs some more run stuffers.


There'll be optimism in the Raiders' fanbase, because there always is. But there's not that much of a reason for it. They're losing one of the top two cornerbacks in the NFL, there's no guarantee that McFadden can continue his much-delayed breakout, there's a 100-percent certainty that Richard Seymour is a year older, and they're still starting Jason Campbell.

Oh yes, and they're still the Raiders too.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed .
Posted on: March 6, 2011 10:24 pm
 

Looks like Gradkowski won't be in Oakland in '11

Gradkowski Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Jason Campbell, barring any last minute Draft day declarations (and this IS the Raiders we’re writing about), should be the starting QB next season in Oakland. Owner Al Davis has made it clear he likes Campbell – and perhaps, in part, Campbell is an indirect reason that Tom Cable, who wasn’t as big a fan as his boss, is no longer coaching the squad – and new coach Hue Jackson is on board, as well.

The rest of the QB roster looks like this: Bruce Gradkowski, Charlie Frye, Kyle Boller and J.T. O’Sullivan. And considering, as the Contra Costa Times reports, Gradkowski – the best player of any of the backups – wasn’t offered a tender, it seems like his days in Oakland might be finished.

Last year, Gradkowski was tendered as a second-round player (meaning he was paid $1.8 million) and was considered insurance for JaMarcus Russell. Then, when Russell spectacularly flamed out, the Raiders acquired Campbell from Washington and named him the starter. But it didn’t take Gradkowski long to get playing time.

He replaced Campbell in the second half of the second game of the season, and for the rest of the year, the two went back and forth, as they battled injuries and, frankly, crappy QB play.

Once a new CBA is reached, Gradkowski could be offered a contract, but Jerry McDonald writes that it’s unlikely. A more likely scenario is that Frye will take over the backup spot and the team might try to sign a developmental quarterback who theoretically could be the team’s future.

Either way, Gradkowski has had success in this league. He deserves a chance to be what he ultimately believes he is: a starting quarterback.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed .
Posted on: January 18, 2011 7:25 pm
Edited on: January 18, 2011 7:30 pm
 

Al Davis pulls no punches on Tom Cable

Posted by Andy Benoit

Did you happen to catch what Al Davis said about Cable Tuesday afternoon? The Raiders owner helT. Cable (US Presswire)d one of his annual I hate my head coach and here’s why press conferences. Apparently, because of lawsuits brought against Cable by Randy Hanson (broken jaw guy from ’09) and Marie Lutz (a lady Cable was dating…more on her in a second), Davis wanted to fire Cable with six games left in the 2010 season. But he didn’t because he didn’t want the turmoil to disrupt the team’s playoff chances.

On Hanson, the always entertainingly honest Davis said, "When we had the ... Randy Hanson incident, we had a turmoil in our coaching staff. Randy's jaw was broken, to this day nobody is sure how it was broken. We had a spouse accuse the head coach of personal relations that were not good. And at that time there were a lot of people who wanted me to take action."

The Lutz situation is complicated. Lutz was the woman Cable dated before marrying his third wife. She is the one who went on ESPN and accused Cable of domestic violence. Davis says he learned with six weeks left in the season that Cable was not entirely forthcoming about this ordeal last year when accusations first came out. He also learned that the head coach had brought Lutz on the road with him and was “flying in friends so they could be with them the night before the game.”

"One of the things revealed by Ms. Lutz was too much for me," Davis said, according to NBC Bay Area.

Instead of firing Cable and distracting the team, the 81-year-old owner began fining him $20,000 a week (docked from his paycheck). Cable filed a grievance to recoup those fines.

Lutz’s lawsuit, which named the Raiders, was settled out of court. Hanson’s is up for arbitration in front of Commissioner Roger Goodell.

As for Cable, he had an eventful day Tuesday. He agreed to become the offensive line coach in Seattle.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.
Category: NFL
Posted on: January 18, 2011 7:00 pm
 

Seahawks hire Tom Cable to coach offensive line

Posted by Andy Benoit

It didn’t take Tom Cable long to find a new job. The recently-dismissed Raiders head coach is joining the Seattle Seahawks as an offensive line coach. Prior to his promotion to head coach, Cable held this position with the Raiders. He is regarded as one of the best offensive line instructors in the business.

The Seahawks offensive line floundered early this past season after legendary zone blocking guru Alex Gibbs abruptly retired. Cable is erudite in the zone schemes that Gibbs installed.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.
Category: NFL
Posted on: January 17, 2011 7:52 pm
Edited on: January 17, 2011 9:37 pm
 

Hue Jackson named Raiders head coach

Posted by Will Brinson

The wait is over -- Hue Jackson has been named the new head coach of the Oakland Raiders on Monday night, the team announced. Jackson's now the sixth (!) head coach of the Bay-Area franchise since 2003.

Jackson's been expected to be named the head coach ever since Jan. 4, when the Raiders announced they wouldn't pick up Tom Cable's option. But things have progressed at a typical Raiders-style pace until it was finally reported by multiple outlets (Michael Smith of ESPN was first) that Jackson had been hired.

It appears that Al Davis finally made up his mind, however, and made a move (coincidentally one day after it was reported that he docked Cable, $120,000 during the 2010 season). Davis was lured to Jackson based primarily on Oakland's improvement on offense since Jackson took over last year -- after taking over the playcalling duties from Cable, Jackson helped the Raiders double their scoring output from 2009.

Al Saunders is the expected candidate to fill the role from which Jackson was promoted -- offensive coordinator -- and while the Raiders' lag time meant many people were scooped off the coaching-staff pile of names, Jackson's been calling around about forming a staff for a week or so.

More importantly, we can finally put our Coaching Hot Seat Tracker to rest (at least until next year) as every NFL team has filled the position.

Amazingly, as Tim Kawakami points out on Twitter, this is Al Davis' 11th consecutive head coaching hire that followed the pattern of alternating between offensive coordinator and offensive-line coach (Mike Shanahan was an OC, Art Shell was a line coach, Mike White - OC, Joe Bugel - OL, Jon Gruden - OC, Bill Callahan - OL, Norv Turner - OC, Art Shell - OL, Lane Kiffin - OC, Tom Cable - OL, Jackson - OC). That's a terrifying amount of predictability from such a kooky character.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com