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Tag:Trent Williams
Posted on: December 4, 2011 1:38 pm
 

'Skins Davis, Williams suspended for drug tests?

Posted by Will Brinson

A few weeks ago, reports began surfacing that a number of NFL players (11 to be exact) failed drug tests and that a pair of Redskins -- offensive tackle Trent Williams and tight end Fred Davis -- could face suspensions.

But since then it's been pretty quiet surrounding Davis and Williams. Until Sunday anyway, when Sports Illustrated's Jim Trotter reported that both Williams and Davis received four-game suspensions for failed drug tests.

Trotter reports that the pair of Redskins initially received season-long suspensions, but had them reduced as part of the NFL and NFLPA's settlement. The other nine players who were nailed for failed tests were busted during the grace period following the end of the 2011 lockout.

Williams and Davis, per Trotter, failed the tests during the season, which is why they received the four-game suspensions.

The pair were not suspended for Sunday's game against the Jets (currently underway -- follow here) because they did not receive notice from the league in time.

However, the season is effectively over for Davis and Williams, as the Redskins have just four games left. Barring a miracle playoff run, the pair won't play against this season.

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Posted on: November 13, 2011 11:36 am
 

DeMaurice Smith, players not on same page

DeMaurice SmithPosted by Josh Katzowitz

For the most part, the players and the NFLPA remained unified during the offseason labor dispute, and though there were some outspoken comments here or there, union executive director DeMaurice Smith did a nice job of keeping the players together.

But since the new CBA was signed, some players have been upset at the way Smith handled the last-minute labor negotiations, especially because the union apparently signed off on allowing the NFL to potentially suspend eight players for their lockout transgressions. Even retired players have gotten into the act, suing the NFLPA and saying the then-decertified union was in no position to negotiate on their behalf.

Now, players are upset once again at the way the NFLPA is treating the rank and file members.

As Yahoo Sports’
Jason Cole reports, 10 players are facing fines and one player could be fined and suspended for testing positive for recreational drugs. The problem with that (aside from the obvious) is that according to Cole, Smith promised there would be a “grace period” for players after a new CBA was signed. That grace period was supposed to last 30 days when players wouldn’t be drug tested, but on Day 2 of the new CBA, officials began testing players.

According to ESPN’s Adam Schefter, two of the players who tested positive are Redskins tight end Fred Davis and Redskins left tackle Trent Williams.

“I told De that this was a concern of a number of players after the lockout ended and he said, ‘I got you covered,’” one of the player reps told Cole. “I went back and told the players, ‘Look, whatever it is you’ve been doing, you need to stop and be ready, but that we would probably have a 30-day grace period before the league started testing.’

“Then we get to camp and [the league is] testing us on Day 2. Guys are looking at me like I don’t know what I’m talking about. It was embarrassing. I called the union and I was told there were a lot of things that fell through the cracks at the last minute.”

NFLPA spokesman George Atallah declined to comment on the report, but another player rep told Yahoo that players are wondering what else “had fallen through the cracks” and that they can’t get straight answers “on a lot of stuff.”

Smith, it seems like, has been silent on some of these and other issues, and it might be time for him to speak to his players and try to assuage their fears. In other news, 10 years of labor peace is awesome.

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Posted on: October 27, 2011 11:39 am
 

Keep an Eye On: Week 8's finer points of analysis

Posted by Eye on Football Analyst Andy Benoit



Giants vs. Dolphins
One of the more confounding issues with the Dolphins this season has been the decline of their pass-rush. After recording 39 sacks in 2010 (tied for 10th best in the NFL) Miami entered last week’s game against Denver with just eight. They wound up recording seven sacks in the game, but that was in part because of Tim Tebow’s inability to make quick reads or get the ball out.

The Giants’ reshuffled offensive line has been hit or miss in pass protection thus far (more “hit” than “miss”). At Arizona in Week 4, their brilliant protection practically won the game. But the next week it waffled against Seattle’s underrated D-line (Chris Clemons rather enjoyed facing left tackle Will Beatty).

The Dolphins have one of the game’s best all-around edge-rushers in Cameron Wake, the reigning AFC sack leader. His leverage and tenacity give him strength that’s much better than his size indicates. Wake has been oddly quiet in non-two minute situations this season, though he abused Denver’s somewhat lumbering right tackle, Orlando Franklin, last week.

Giants right tackle Kareem McKenzie is more polished than Franklin but has slower feet. He’ll need help. On the other side, Miami may have an under-the-radar pass-rushing talent in Jared Odrick, who somewhat resembles a thicker Jason Taylor.

Ravens vs. Cardinals
The Ravens offense owes everyone a good performance after ruining one of our 17 precious Monday night games. They should be able to get on track against a Cardinals defense that has struggled to generate a consistent pass-rush despite aggressive blitzes from new coordinator Ray Horton.

The intrigue is on the other side of the ball. Roughly two months after the trade and $20-million-plus investment in Kevin Kolb, some Cardinal fans are actually wondering if the 27-year-old quarterback should be benched. That’s the kind of ridiculous thinking that those who don’t actually contribute any skin in the game can get away with. Ken Whisenhunt knows that he’d never get another coaching job if he were to bench Kolb for John Skelton.

Kolb hasn’t been great, but he’s hardly the problem. Arizona’s “non-Fitzgerald” receivers have not been able to get open. General manager Rod Graves may deserve some heat for letting Steve Breaston get away this past offseason, though Graves’ logic was understandable at the time. Third-round rookie Andre Roberts showed intriguing potential as a speedy slasher last season.

Roberts looked like a future starter, and he cost a fraction of what Breaston would have cost. So Graves banked on him. Roberts has responded by failing to reach 40 yards receiving in every game this season. The good-looking prospect prior to Roberts, Early Doucet, has been equally ineffective.

Teams can sometimes get away with having only one quality wide receiver, but not if their offensive tackles stink. And there’s no denying that Levi Brown and Brandon Keith – two heavy-footed lumberers with inconsistent technique – stink.

So far Kolb has been awful when throwing off-balance. It’s doubtful he’ll get to be on balance much against a staunch Ravens D.

Bills vs. Redskins
Don’t pick the Redskins this week. It’s a matter of principle, if nothing else. No team should have expectations placed on it after making a change at quarterback and losing its top wide receiver, running back, tight end, left tackle and left guard in a two-week span. This will look like a preseason version of the Redskins. How will they cope?

It helps that Mike Shanahan’s system runs more fluidly with John Beck than it does with Rex Grossman. Beck is smoother reading the field and much better at play-action rollouts and bootlegs than Grossman. Accuracy is a bit of a concern, however. As for the other injuries and replacement ...

RB Tim Hightower (knee – out for season) had found his niche in this zone-run scheme, but he’ll be missed most in the passing game. Ryan Torain is a decent upright power-runner with a spring in his step, but he can’t stick pass-rushers the way Hightower could.

WR Santana Moss (hand – out 5-7 weeks) was Washington’s only creator on offense. He could generate his own space and turn an underneath catch into a 60-yard scamper. Either Niles Paul or Anthony Armstrong will replace him. Both have flashed at times, but neither is completely trustworthy. And, unlike with Moss, defenses won’t have to even ponder the possibility of double coverage.

TE Chris Cooley (finger, knee – out for season) was trending down and losing his role to Fred Davis prior to get hurting. Davis can fill Cooley’s receiving shoes. But the Redskins are now down a good in-line blocker in the run game. With Cooley and Davis, Washington had the benefit of balancing its formation with a viable pass-catching tight end on each side. This often compelled defenses to stay in basic front seven looks. New backup tight end Logan Paulsen won’t command that kind of respect.

LT Trent Williams (high ankle sprain – out 0-4 weeks) has missed most of the last two games. Pretty easy to identify the impact of his absence: backup Sean Locklear is experienced but much slower than Williams all-around.

LG Kory Lichtensteiger (knee – out for season) was one of the unheralded heroes for this team down the stretch last year and prior to going down in Week 6. Center Will Montgomery moved one spot to the left to fill Lichtensteiger’s void. Montgomery is interchangeable that way, but his replacement in the middle, Erik Cook, a seventh-round pick in ’10, was a noticeable downgrade coming off the bench. He had issues snapping the ball and was overwhelmed by defensive tackle Mike Peterson on a few plays. The Redskins can only hope those were Cook’s jitters working themselves out.

So who will win? Check our NFL expert picks for all Week 8 games

Follow @Andy_Benoit on Twitter or contact him at Andy.Benoit-at-NFLTouchdown.com.
Posted on: June 15, 2011 4:30 pm
Edited on: June 15, 2011 4:40 pm
 

Why wasn't Trent Williams at Redskins practice?

T. Williams might face criticism for not showing up for Washington's workouts (Getty).Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Since players across the NFL have begun participating in workouts organized and led by their peers, we haven’t heard much in the way of criticism against those who have not joined in with their teammates.

WR Chad Ochocinco doesn’t show up for Bengals practice, and nobody makes a peep. WR Braylon Edwards misses Jets workouts, and he doesn’t hear criticism.

But when Redskins LT Trent Williams failed to show for workouts this week, at least one of his teammates had something to say about it.

“We’re here so we think it’s valuable,” G Kory Lichtensteiger told the Washington Examiner. “I don’t know why everyone else doesn’t. I know some people have to book a plane flight, but we have rookies here that are booking plane flights and first-year guys that don’t have a lot of money in the bank booking plane flights. So I don’t think there’s a whole lot of good excuses not to be here, honestly.”

Williams has an excuse regardless.

In an interview with ESPN 980, Williams claimed he thought the camp was for backs and wide receivers. Oh, he’s got another excuse as well. He didn’t find out about the camp until it was too late.

“I feel like it’s a big deal,” Williams said. “If I wouldn’t have found out Monday that the workouts were Tuesday, then I probably would have been there. It was a last-minute deal.”

So yeah, those excuses seem rather flimsy, especially when you take into account the questions about his work ethic. But Williams wasn’t done making them.

From the Washington Post:

Reached by phone Wednesday, Williams said that he has been training with roughly a dozen players in his hometown of Houston. He said he considered attending this week’s workouts, but decided not to go because he was in a wedding last weekend, which would have interfered with travel plans.

“I kind of had my hands tied,” Williams said. “But I figure as long as I’m getting work in and am making sure I’m ready. I’ve been trimming down a little bit, focusing on total body strength, and I started back [doing squats] this offseason, which I hadn’t done since my sophomore year, to get my explosiveness in my legs back. I feel great.”

But if you ask TE Chris Cooley, none of that really matters. Williams can show up or not, and it’s not a big deal.

“Everyone has their own preparation and own thing going on,” Cooley told the Examiner. “We’re not going to be disappointed in anyone not showing up. All I would say is that I’m benefiting from this; I feel this is making me a better player and this is preparing me to play this year.”

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Posted on: September 30, 2010 8:46 am
 

Week 4 Key Matchup: Sufficient skill for 'Skins?

Posted by Andy Benoit

Obviously on Sunday the focus in Philadelphia will be on Donovan McNabb. But what about the rest of the other 21 players on the field? The 1-2 Redskins are dangerously thin – emaciated, even – at the skill positions. Wideout Santana Moss can stretch the field. Fellow wideout Joey Galloway can stretch the field only theoretically. The 16th-year veteran has just three catches on the season.

You can’t count on Galloway or any of the backup wide receivers to provide much. Thus, one key for Washington will be finding ways to avoid a Moss-on-Asante Samuel matchup. Moss’ game is predicated on speed and quickness. Samuel’s off-ball style of coverage naturally neutralizes these elements.

Chris Cooley is often Washington’s X-factor. In this game, he’s a XX-factor. The Eagles struggled mightily last season in covering tight ends. Hence, the trade for speedy underneath outside linebacker Ernie Sims. By using Cooley in motion and aligning him in a variety of areas (the slot, backfield, etc.), Washington can force Sims – or, ideally, strong safety Quintin Mikell – to react presnap. This will make Philadelphia’s blitz schemes easier to diagnose.

A key factor will be whether rookie left tackle Trent Williams is healthy enough to block Trent Cole one-on-one (Williams was inactive in Week 3 but returned to practice Wednesday and is expected to play.) The Redskins would hate to have to keep Cooley in as an extra pass-blocker. In fact, they’d probably use Cooley as a de factor receiver and refer to second tight end Fred Davis for blocking duties. In that case, fullback Mike Sellers might off the field, which could dilute the play-action threat.

The Redskins must incorporate their run game to avoid getting into a shootout. Running will be tough given the issues at left guard (incumbent starter Derrick Dockery has fallen into a serious job competition with Kory Lichtensteiger). Philly’s Mike Patterson and Broderick Bunkley form one of the more vociferous defensive tackle tandems in the league. Plus, backup Trevor Laws is coming off one of his best games as a pro.

And let’s not forget, Clinton Portis is nearing the point where he’s only effective as a fourth quarter closer (assuming he’s still fresh in the fourth quarter). Plus, Portis’ bruising style won’t be as impactful against 258-pound middle linebacker Stewart Bradley. Ryan Torain is Washington’s best runner – especially in Mike Shanahan’s zone scheme. Don’t be surprised if Torain wears the hat on Sunday.

Ron Jaworski thought McNabb had perhaps the best game of his career against the Texans in Week 2. That still came in a losing effort. McNabb’s return trip to the City of Brotherly Love could be a reminder that talent is important, but equally as important is the talent around you.

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Posted on: September 17, 2010 3:12 pm
 

Redskins may have a star at left tackle

Posted by Andy Benoit

Don’t be surprised if the hype builds in a hurry around Redskins rookie left tackle Trent Williams. The No. 4 overall pick was expected to be as raw as war spelled backwards after spending just one somewhat unimpressive season at left tackle while at Oklahoma. But so far, Williams has given the Redskins every reason to trust the protection on Donovan McNabb’s blind side. T. Williams (US Presswire)

Williams wasn’t spectacular in pass protection against Dallas, but he held his own against DeMarcus Ware. Noteworthy was that the Redskins gave him little to no help most of the night. How many players have ever been tasked with blocking a perennial Pro Bowler one-on-one in their NFL debut?

In the ground game, Williams’ stunning athleticism was evident, particularly when he got out in front on a Chris Cooley screen pass.

"Trent Williams is, bar none, the best athlete as an offensive lineman that I've seen since I've been in the league," Cooley said on the 106.7’s The LaVar Arrington Show with Chad Dukes. "The guy can move. It was funny: we were in Phoenix; none of us played, we just went out and ran, and then all the receivers ran routes with the quarterbacks. Trent Williams went out and ran routes with us. The dude can run routes. He's probably as fast as me."

As if blocking Ware wasn’t enough, the rookie gets to face Mario Williams in Week 2. There is speculation, however, that the Texans might align their star defensive end on the left side more often than usual, in order to create a mismatch against Jammal Brown. Brown is a two-time Pro Bowler (granted, he’s relatively new at the right tackle position). It would speak volumes if the Texans do elect a Williams-on-Brown matchup over a Williams-on-Williams matchup.

Either way, the Skins should be pleased. Chris Samuels is gone, but it looks like it we didn't have to wait long to see a new star left tackle in burgundy and gold.

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Posted on: August 24, 2010 3:33 pm
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Posted on: August 23, 2010 1:56 pm
 

Trent Williams might need some help

T. Williams struggled against Baltimore's pass rush Saturday (US Presswire). Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Trent Williams will face numerous pass-rushing specialists this year – some of the best defensive ends and linebackers in the game. Sure, he’s a rookie LT, but he also was the fourth pick taken in the NFL Draft and the Redskins are expecting him to keep QB Donovan McNabb’s blind side safe.

That’s why Saturday night’s game against the Ravens was so disheartening.

Baltimore’s Terrell Suggs – who’s more of an all-around LB rather than a monster pass-rusher – owned Williams, who gave up a sack and numerous pressures to Suggs in the Ravens win. As the Washington Post points out, that means the Redskins might need to give Williams more help, especially when he has to face the likes of DeMarcus Ware, Mario Williams, Trent Cole and Dwight Freeney this season.

Jason Reid writes:

On Suggs's sack of McNabb in the second quarter, Williams was beaten so badly off the ball that he never had a chance to set up and get into his technique. For that matter, McNabb didn't have a chance, either. And the big play illustrated why premier rush ends/outside linebackers are valued more in the NFL than any position except quarterback and lock-down corners.

(After a Baltimore fumble), on Washington's first play, Suggs raced past Williams and brought down McNabb for a five-yard loss. The Redskins attempted two deep passes that fell incomplete, punted and did nothing on offense for the remainder of the blowout loss.

Late in the first quarter, with Washington facing third and 1, Suggs drove Williams into the backfield and brought down running back Larry Johnson for a three-yard loss. Williams also was called for a false start.

Of course, it was only a preseason game. Suggs has won many individual battles throughout his career against some of the game's most experienced and talented left tackles. And the Redskins had other major pass-protection issues against Baltimore, especially in blitz pick-ups.


But still, not a great start for a tackle who’s very athletic but was also known as a devastating run blocker and just a pretty good pass protector while in college.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com