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Tag:Vinny Cerrato
Posted on: November 5, 2011 8:55 pm
 

Theismann prefers Grossman over Beck

Theismann thinks Grossman gives the Redskins the best chance to win. (US PRESSWIRE)

Posted by Ryan Wilson

The Redskins won three of four games to begin the season, all with Rex Grossman under center. The former first-round pick would start just once more, a four-pick effort against the Eagles in Week 6, before head coach Mike Shanahan replaced him with John Beck, who last started an NFL game in 2007.

Predictably, the results have been laughable; Washington's 0-2 with Beck under center and this does not sit well with former 'Skins quarterback and Super Bowl champ Joe Theismann.

“I just don’t agree with the decision to start John Beck,” Theismann said before the Redskins played the Panthers two weeks ago.

And those sentiments haven't changed. Appearing on Mike Wise's radio show Thursday, Theismann shared his thoughts on Beck (via the Sports Bog's Dan Steinberg).

“I think John’s inexperience has shown a little bit. John hasn’t played a lot of football; Rex has played a lot more football and I think is a little bit more comfortable with what they want to try and do.

“Remember, Rex, this is his third year in the system. He’s made some decisions that have hurt him. Some of the interceptions are not his fault and some of them are. That’s all shared. It’s like the 10 sacks last week against Buffalo. I think John has to shoulder responsibility for five of them, and the job up front by the offensive line and tight ends and route runners have to shoulder some responsibility."

It's worth pointing out that 'Skins offensive coordinator Kyle Shanahan brought Grossman to the Redskins from the Texans where they worked together. That said, we're still talking about Rex Grossman.

And that leads us to this: despite Theismann's arm-waving, there isn't much difference between the two quarterbacks this season.

* Completion percentage: Grossman - 55.8; Beck - 58.8
* TD per pass attempt: Grossman - 3.6%; Beck - 1.2%
* INT per pass attempt: Grossman - 5.5%; Beck - 3.5%
* Passer rating: Grossman - 66.5; Beck - 69.9

According to Football Outiders' quarterback efficiency metric, Grossman ranks 29th behind Sam Bradford and Kyle Orton. Beck ranks 37th, ahead of only Tim Tebow and Blaine Gabbert (among QBs with at least 60 pass attempts through Week 8).


The San Francisco 49ers look to continue their impressive run as they travel to FedEx field to face off against the Washington Redskins on Sunday. Who will come out on top? Jason Horowitz and NFL.com's Pat Kirwan break down this game.

So, yeah, if you're Shanahan, it doesn't really matter who you play. Just close your eyes and pick one because the outcome probably won't change.

Washington hosts San Francisco Sunday and if Beck gets off to another slow start Theismann thinks Rex should replace him (because, really, nothing screams consistency like swapping QBs ever few weeks).

“...If John struggles in this game, I think Mike’s almost obligated to go back to Rex," he told Wise. "You thought that John Beck would bring you some more versatility, you thought that he would bring you a little more [mobility to] the quarterback position, but it hasn’t really worked out that way with all the injuries.”

Ah, yes, the injuries. Cueing Grantland's Bill Barnwell:

"Washington is more susceptible to injuries than the average team because the depth behind their starters is so bad. Their 3-1 start before the bye, no surprise, was as a very healthy football team! Since then, injuries have riddled the offense, which is now down six of its expected starters from before the season."

It's almost as if Vinny Cerrato's ghost continues to haunt Redskins Park.

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Posted on: June 15, 2011 8:52 pm
Edited on: June 16, 2011 12:11 am
 

Redskins need to consider life after Haynesworth

Posted by Ryan Wilson

A new labor deal may or may not be on the horizon, but when the owners and players come to an agreement, there will likely be an accelerated free-agency period followed by training camp and the regular season.

By that point, everything should be back to normal, which includes Albert Haynesworth making life difficult for some poor coach who thought he would be the one to motivate a man seemingly incapable of being motivated. Redskins coach Mike Shanahan was never under such illusions when he arrived in Washington last year. By the preseason it was clear they couldn't co-exist.

Just chalk it up as another one of Dan Snyder's high-priced personnel mistakes. (The 'Skins gave Haynesworth a $100 million deal in February 2009, including $41 million in guarantees.)

And now, even though Washington desperately needs some help along the defensive line, the rebuilding process won't include Haynesworth. NFL Network's Jason La Canfora figures "Aubrayo Franklin and Cullen Jenkins [will] get a good long look [from the 'Skins]," adding that “I think they’d trade (Haynesworth) for a seventh-round pick somewhere outside the division before they dealt him to the Eagles."

(La Canfora mentioned Philadelphia because Jim Washburn, Haynesworth's former defensive line coach in Tennessee, now coaches the Eagles' defensive line.) 

“They should have taken a fifth for him last offseason and ended the circus then,” La Canfora continued. “We shall see. Skins GM Bruce Allen has repeatedly told Haynesworth’s people that if they don’t get ‘real value’ in a trade they won’t move him, but I don’t see them getting anything better than a fifth for him, and they have wanted much more than that.”

Allen's thinking isn't unique to the Redskins. It's prevalent among teams that fork over substantial paydays for big-name free agents only to get in return substandard performances and less salary-cap wiggle room. Instead of cutting bait and moving on, they suffer from what economists call the "sunk cost fallacy." In English, it's simply throwing good money after bad.

Brian Burke of AdvancedNFLStats.com talked about the sunk cost fallacy late in the 2009 season, relating it to JaMarcus Russell.
Russell certainly isn’t the only top pick who was kept under center too long. Just about every team has had a similar experience in recent memory. General managers and coaches are the ones least willing to cut their losses with bad players because they’re the ones most attached to the sunk costs. The importance of responsibility is why it makes some sense to periodically replace senior management, whether at corporation, a government agency, or professional football team. New managers are not beholden to their predecessors’ sunk costs, and are freer to make rational decisions.
Unfortunately for the Redskins, Allen -- who inherited Haynesworth from Vinny Cerrato -- hasn't followed that advice. Presumably because in the back of Allen's mind is the fear that if he cuts Haynesworth, not only does that mean tens of millions of dollars down the drain (sunk cost!), there's the chance that another team will sign him, and worse, he will play well.

To paraphrase an an old saying: "A player is worth what somebody's willing to pay for him." Which is usually muttered right before someone else says, "It only takes one team." The problem: "one team" has historically referred to the Redskins, an outfit renown for paying well over market rates -- either in salary or draft picks -- for locker room malcontents, players on the downside of great careers or both.

Of course, if Allen promptly jettisons Haynesworth when the lockout ends, and Bill Belichick signs him for the league minimum, expect the media to hail the decision as "low-risk" and "genius." It's this thinking that got the Redskins in their current predicament.

On the upside, Washington gets a $41 million paperweight out of it. So there's that.

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Posted on: June 22, 2010 10:12 pm
 

Vinny Cerrato takes a beating

Though Vinny Cerrato is no longer working in the Redskins front office, that didn’t stop Fanhouse’s Chris Harry from brutally taking down Washington’s former executive vice president of football operations.

Cerrato has stuck around Washington, hosting a radio show on ESPN 980, and that gives Harry all the ammunition he needs.

Cerrato needs to either shut up or just go away. He was owner Daniel Snyder’s enabler for the most abysmal run of acquisitions since the free-agency era began in 1993. Come to think of it, the Redskins ineptitude on this front seems like a perfect topic for our FanHouse NFL list of the week.


Then, Harry rehashed the top-five worst moves made by Cerrato (not counting the Albert Haynesworth deal), and yeah, they all seem pretty terrible. Names like Jeff George and Deion Sanders and money figures like $56 million (for Sanders) and $35 million (for both Adam Archuleta and Jeremiah Trotter) are bandied about.

It’s sorta like when your favorite band releases a greatest-hits album, except the complete opposite of that.

Definitely not a great day to be Haynesworth , but it’s also not a great day to be Vinny Cerrato.


--Josh Katzowitz

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com