Tag:fake injuries
Posted on: September 23, 2011 10:30 am
Edited on: September 23, 2011 10:56 am
 

Giants coach Perry Fewell doesn't deny faking

Perry Fewell and Deon Grant respond to accusations by Bryan Kehl(Getty Images/US PRESSWIRE)

Posted by Ryan Wilson


We're four days into "Fake injuries: Why, lord, why?" and while the mock outrage has waned, the conversation about whether it's acceptable to take dives continues. Vikings punter Chris Kluwe sent out a helpful reminder that "this isn't soccer, play like you have a pair" (the league sent out its own memo on the matter, too), but that came a day after former Giants linebacker Bryan Kehl accused Giants defensive coordinator Perry Fewell of teaching his players to fake injuries.

When asked about it Thursday, Fewell, instead of flat-out denying the charge, offered this: "I can't say I've ever done that and I can't say that I haven't done that."

Informative. There's more.

"I know that [Giants safety Deon Grant] was down and I was glad that he got up, and he was able to play. If the guy can't play to his full potential and he was hurt, then he was hurt. But I can't say I did and I can't say I've never done that. So I'm not gonna go back and forth about it."

Weird, we thought "maybe, maybe not" was exactly what it meant to go back and forth. Not to worry, though; Perry defended himself when asked if Kehl's accusations were an attack on his integrity. "I'm not gonna respond."

The Giants and injurygate

That's a peculiar reply to somebody calling you out like that. But Grant, the player accused of faking an injury during Monday night's Rams-Giants game, had Fewell's back (Grant has defended himself, too).

"That's a lie. That's a lie," Grant said after Giants practice on Thursday. "Perry never said that a day in his meetings since I've been here. And Kehl's been here as long as I have with Perry Fewell."

Grant then hedged.

"And even if (Fewell did teach players to fake injuries), that was a coward move to me," Grant said of Kehl. "Even if that's something I was coached and I go somewhere else, I'm not selling out the guys that I went to war with. That's just not me. So that's a coward move if that was the case, and he still said something about it, but it's even worse when he lies. A grown man lying on another grown man, that's terrible."

Right. It's almost as awkward as a grown man saying something like, say, "I can't say I've ever done that and I can't say that I haven't done that."

Look, we don't have a dog in this fight, and in the scheme of things, pretend boo-boos are hardly the scourge on the NFL that some folks have made it out to be. In fact, we're with Ravens safety Ed Reed, who was asked if he thought the Giants were faking Monday night.

“I don’t know if they were pretending, man,” Reed said, according to the Baltimore Sun. “Sometimes guys get tired. But it’s all within the game. It’s all tactical stuff that you need to use. Whatever it takes.”

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Posted on: September 22, 2011 6:45 pm
Edited on: September 22, 2011 6:46 pm
 

Dungy: Texans biggest offenders for fake injuries

Dungy on faking injuries: Texans were the worst offenders. (Getty Images)

Posted by Ryan Wilson

As far as football games go, the Monday night matchup between the Rams and Giants was pretty forgettable. In fact, the lasting memory from the game wasn't a particular play, but the sight of two Giants players laying on the turf pretending to be injured. Safety Deon Grant offered up a flimsy self-defense, and the league has threatened to punish future offenders. Perhaps worst of all, critics compared the Giants' tactics to a bunch of diving soccer players.

The Giants and injurygate

But when it comes to make-believe injuries, the Giants aren't nearly as bad as, say, the Texans. Former Colts coach and division rival Tony Dungy explained in great detail Thursday during an appearance on The Dan Patrick Show.

Patrick asked Dungy if he had ever had a player fake an injury.

"No I've never done that but in the time I was coaching in Indy we saw it quite a bit, we really did," Dungy said. "It's a tactic that is used, it's part of what's happening now in the NFL and it's really tough to prove. We sent in a lot of tapes to the league and it never could get resolved so just kind of have to go with the flow and know that it's going to happen."

When Patrick asked if Dungy remembered which teams he reported to the league, Dungy didn't hesitate.

"The biggest offenders we saw were the Houston Texans. We played them twice a year, our players knew the defensive line coach there, they knew the signal for faking an injury," he said. "Chad Bratzke would always tell me, 'Here it comes. Guy's gonna fall down right now.'

"And that's what would happen and, you know, they'd catch their breath or whatever and get the substitutions in, you'd send it in to the league and say, 'Hey, this guy was never contacted on the play, let's look at it. The trainer's out there for three or four minutes working on him.'

"But it really is hard to tell. And how can you say when a guy really is hurt and when he isn't? Miraculously, though, they all seem to come back into the game."


* via SportsGrid.com

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