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Tag:Arizona Cardinals
Posted on: September 19, 2010 11:27 am
 

Reports: Beanie Wells not dressed, 'likely' out

Posted by Will Brinson

Beanie Wells, for the second straight Sunday, is the most watched player before the games kick off -- it's mainly because of fantasy football, but everyone wants to know if Beanie's playing.

It seems -- given multiple reports -- that he will not play against the Atlanta Falcons, and Tim Hightower will get most/all of the Cardinals carries.

Will Carroll (a.k.a. "The Injury Expert") reports on Twitter that Wells is "not dressed, per sources" and "likely out."

Knox Bardeen of FanHouse tweets that Wells is "walking around sweat pants and a t-shirt and doing nothing to test his knee." Bardeen also notes that Wells is "talking to people [and] generally acting casual."

None of these things -- Carroll's report, Beanie not testing his knee, and Beanie wearing sweatpants -- are good news for the Arizona Cardinals (or Beanie's fantasy owners, grrr) as it sure seems like there'll be another week-long wait to see if Wells can really turn the Arizona offense into a high-powered running game.

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Posted on: September 18, 2010 12:04 pm
 

Hot Routes 9.18.10: Haley hates your fantasy team

Posted by Will Brinson

It's a morning (well, close to it in this case) collection of stuff for you to read. In this case, while you watch football. Send suggestions to us on Twitter (@CBSSportsNFL) and if you're nice we'll include them.
  • Todd Haley is totally aware of your fantasy football team. He's also totally aware that you spent much of Monday night (and will spend much of Sunday) screaming at him for playing Thomas Jones as much as Jamaal Charles (and at Jones for even existing). And you know what? He doesn't care .
  • Here's a nice little story about how the Browns are familiar with the Chiefs defense. But it's much, much more valuable reading for the quote from Eric Mangini about the time he lived in the same house with Romeo Crennel and they were both really, really fat .
  • Chad Ochocinco is on a Dwight Schrute "black Bears are best" type of Twitter rampage, hitting up some "facts." My favorite ? #fact I will smashed by Ray Lewis at some point in the game, i will jump as usual n continue to talk shh, why? I ain't got no sense #shrugs
  • BShrout of Mile High Report takes a gander at "Yards Per Point" and how it's relative to a team's long-term success. (As in, over the course of a season, if a defense forces teams to require more yards per point, their opponents won't score as many points. Or, if an offense requires lots of yards per point, they're unlikely to score as often. I think that's what happening -- either way, good stuff.
Posted on: September 18, 2010 11:17 am
 

Dockett fined $5,000 for pre-kickoff tweeting

Posted by Will Brinson

Darnell Dockett is pretty active on Twitter, and that's a good thing, as he's typically a pretty funny fella on the Interwebs. Last week, though, he was a little too active for even the NFL's tastes, and he's been fined $5,000 for tweeting inside of the 90 minute pre-kickoff "no electronics" window.

That's via Darren Urban of the Cards' official website (but on Twitter, natch ) who also points out that Calais Campbell got fined the same amount for a hit on Sam Bradford.

The interesting -- and obvious -- comparison here is Chad Ochocinco, who was fined $25,000 for tweeting during a preseason game .

Ochocinco's fine was five times as large as Dockett's and there are two good reasons why. First, Chad tweeted during a game (it's irrelevant for this argument that it was just an exhibition), which is technically the same thing because of the window, but it's most certainly a worse offense because of the potential cheating/Spygate-like implications that could be involved with electronic messaging during games.

Second, Ochocinco clearly is on the NFL's radar when it comes to shenanigans (on the field anyway) and unlike Dockett, this isn't exactly his first run-in with the (NFL) law.

The lesson as always: if you Tweet it, we will see it. And if it's inside the 90 minute window, so will the NFL.

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Posted on: September 17, 2010 11:04 pm
Edited on: September 17, 2010 11:13 pm
 

Beanie Wells a gametime decision

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Cardinals RB Beanie Wells, who’s been out with a knee injury, is listed as questionable on the official NFL injury list. According to the team’s official website, Wells will be a gametime decision, but it doesn't sound real promising,

Writes Darren Urban: “Like the last two weeks, he has done so little, it’s hard to believe he would be much help even if he would be able to play. Now that Jason Wright had all week to practice, however – added in with Tim Hightower and LaRod Stephens-Howling – I would think the Cards can deal with it if Beanie is a no-or-little-go.”

I watched much of last week’s Cardinals-Rams game, and Stephens-Howling (seven carries, 49 yards plus a 27.3 kickoff return average) looked pretty impressive to me. Hightower was OK, minus the two fumbles he lost, though coach Ken Whisenhunt said he wasn’t in danger of losing playing time (of course Whisenhunt also thought Wells would be OK by Game 2, and that doesn’t look like it’ll happen).

And while we're talking about Hightower, here's an interesting story from the Arizona Republic regarding his thoughts on his fumbles.

Said Hightower: "My job is to hold on (to) that football. My job is to make plays. My job is to run the football and be successful at it ... You can try to analyze it, try to break it down, slow it down, rewind it, pause it and do all that stuff. But at the end of the day you've got to find a way to get it done."

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Posted on: September 17, 2010 12:37 pm
 

Hot Routes 9.17.10 Hasselbeck's botched scheme

Posted by Andy Benoit

The Saints are 6-1 on Monday Night Football under Sean Payton.

Rams running back Steven Jackson says in the NFL, a four-yard gain is a positive play. Jackson appreciates the value of patience and wearing down an opponent.

Seahawks quarterback Matt Hasselbeck says he once pretended his headset wasn’t working so that he could call his own play. Just one problem, though: "What I failed to realize is that the other quarterbacks on the sideline have the headset,” Hasselbeck said. “So you have to get in unison on that one."

In Arizona, Beanie Wells remains a question mark for Week 2, while wide receiver Early Doucet is out (hernia).

The Browns are close to getting Shaun Rogers back. And linebacker D’Qwell Jackson is practicing for the first time since August 10.


Packers kicker Mason Crosby struggled at times last season, but in Week 1, he was money from 49 and 56 yards. Now, the Green Bay media is giving him props.

An unintentionally funny headline from ESPN’s Bill Williamson (funny to anyone who sees the Raiders for what they are, anyway). Headline reads: Did Overconfidence Doom Oakland?

If Erik Coleman’s left knee doesn’t respond to treatment, second-year pro William Moore will start at safety for the Falcons this Sunday.

Will wideout Devin Thomas get more involved in the Redskins offense?

Good news, Cowboy fans: Marc Colombo is returning Sunday. (Another way to say this is, “Great news, Cowboy fans: Alex Barron will not start Sunday”.)

The Texans signed a former Buffalo defensive end, but not the one that went to two Pro Bowls.


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Posted on: September 17, 2010 10:44 am
Edited on: September 17, 2010 11:02 am
 

Podcast: Week 2 early game previews

Posted by Will Brinson

It's Friday, which means we're one good night's worth of sleep from getting about 48 straight hours of glorious football.

Saturday is fun, of course, but Sunday is where the real action happens -- Andy Benoit and I hopped on the old podcast machine this week to preview the games that will be played. This particular segment previews the early games on Sunday, and we discuss whether Marshawn Lynch to Green Bay makes sense (and whether Buffalo can beat Green Bay), what the mess is wrong with the Jets offense (and whether they can hang with the Pats), if Jimmy Clausen's time has come in Carolina, whether Chad Henne needs to just go ahead and retire and give his starting job over to Chad Pennington, and whether or not teams like Kansas City and Arizona can magically go to 2-0.

Click play below or make it easy on yourself and Subscribe via iTunes .

If you can't view the podcast, click here to download .


For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow  @cbssportsnfl   on Twitter   and subscribe to our  RSS Feed .
Posted on: September 16, 2010 9:33 am
 

Hot Routes 9.16.10: Video killed the NFL star

Got a link for the Hot Routes ? Follow us on Twitter (@CBSSportsNFL) or drop it in the comments.
  • We've been discussing how "locker room spies" are beneficial to their new team (although Eric Winston told me he doesn't think Kyle Shanahan will make that big of a difference) and the Giants have the best one of all in Jim Sorgi, who was Peyton Manning's backup for quite a while. (Of course they also have, you know, his brother Eli Manning, but he doesn't know the Colts offense.) Sorgi, however, doesn't think it'll matter. Because it's Peyton.
  • One of Brian Bassett's readers noticed that Kris Jenkins had a tough time making it up the stairs at Cortland. Provided this account is true, well, it kind of makes it seem like he shouldn't have even been on the field for Week 1. Or we should have seen another injury coming.
Posted on: September 13, 2010 2:35 am
Edited on: September 13, 2010 2:38 am
 

10 Sunday stories that deserve your attention

Posted by Andy Benoit

1. The Bears are who we thought they were

For months we’ve been saying that Mike Martz’s system won’t work in Chicago. You can’t ask those mediocre receivers to run slow-developing routes – they just won’t get open consistently, we said. You can’t expect that putrid offensive line to sustain blocks in pass protection long enough for Cutler to take regular seven-stop drops, we said. And Cutler – oh jeez – you can’t ask Cutler to read the entire the field and take chances without making costly mistakes, it’s just not in his DNA (we said). J. Cutler (US Presswire)

Well, after one game, it appears that we were…exactly right.

Sure, Chicago beat Detroit. But teams have beaten Detroit 30 times in just the past two years alone. And had Matthew Stafford not been knocked out prior to halftime, the outcome probably would have been different (the Lions, led by Shaun Hill, scored zero points in the second half). And let’s not forget the controversial Calvin Johnson call at the end.

But all that’s actually beside the point. When the Bears watch the film on Monday, they’ll see an offensive line that gave up four sacks and put Cutler under continuous duress. (Heck, Lions journeyman defensive end Turk McBride – Turk McBride, for crying out loud! – looked like an All-Pro going up against Frank Omiyale in this game.) That same offensive line also failed to help its running backs punch in a go-ahead score late in the fourth quarter on four consecutive goal-to-go situations from the one-yard line.

One shudders to think what the Cowboys front seven will do to this group next week…

2. Safety first (if you’re a fan of moronic decisions)

How much disdain must Chan Gailey have for his passing offense to make the ridiculous decision that he made late against the Miami Dolphins? Trailing by three and facing fourth-and-10 on their own one-yard line with under 2:00 to play and two timeouts, the Bills opted not to try to pick up the first down, but instead, to take a safety.

On the surface, taking a safety always seems smart. The reason for this is because it’s such an unconventional move that there’s no way it could ever be as dumb as it sounds (if you explained the concept of taking a safety to someone who never watches football, at some point you’d hear yourself say “and now we’re going to give the other team two points.” Give them two points? What? Why?) In this case, the move was as dumb as it sounds.

The Bills gained nothing in field position by taking the safety because, instead of playing for a field goal (which would mean reaching the 30-yard-line or so), they now had to play for a touchdown (which, Bills fans might not remember these days, would mean reaching the goal-line). Buffalo gave up all their timeouts just to get the ball back with 36 seconds to go at their own 20-yard-line (and had the Dolphins gotten a better punt on the play, the Bills could very well have ended up right back on their goal-line again).

By taking the safety, the Bills were essentially hoping for – nay, planning for – a miracle. Evidently Gailey thought it would take an even bigger miracle for Trent Edwards and those no-name receivers (no-names save for Lee Evans, that is) to gain 10 yards. If you have that little faith in your passing game, you’re officially screwed.

3. Patriots D looks sharp

This was one of those games where the boxscore lies. The boxscore says that Chad Ochocinco caught 12 passes for 159 yards. It says Terrell Owens caught seven passes for 53 yards. (Batman and Robin? More like ROBIN and batman.) The stars may have put up good numbers, but the truth is, the Patriots secondary outplayed the Bengals’ receivers – especially early on, when Cincy wasn’t throwing out of desperation and the Patriots weren’t protecting a huge lead.

New starting defensive backs Devin McCourty and Patrick Chung were both outstanding. McCourty, the first-round rookie corner whom some are saying is already the best defensive back on the roster, stifled Owens on several deep balls in the first half. Chung led the team with 16 tackles, many of them vicious hits.

Phil Simms made an excellent point about this young Patriots defense: it’s faster. A lot faster. The Patriots have prioritized speed in recent drafts (except for the selection of linebacker Brandon Spikes, who had to have a sex tape leaked in order to make people forget about something even more embarrassing: his 40-time). On Sunday, that speed translated into more big plays.

Note: In a follow-up to that last parenthetical jab at Spikes, it’s only fair to mention that the second-round rookie was very solid in his starting debut at inside linebacker.

4. Devin Hester no longer a star return artist

Back in 2006 and 2007 when we said Devin Hester had already had a legendary career’s worth of touchdown returns, we didn’t mean Hester should call it a career for touchdown returns. But do you realize Hester has not returned a punt for a score in three years?

Sunday was a sobering example of how far Hester has fallen (by the way, his fall ironically coincides with his promotion to a starting receiver role). Six times, the Lions punted from backed up in their own end zone. On the day, Hester had five punt return opportunities – most of them on line-drive balls he caught in the middle of the field. His total return yards? 17. Three years ago, in a game like this, he would have had 17 touchdowns (don’t worry about the math – he would have found a way; Hester was supernatural back then.)

There’s no reason Hester can’t recapture his magic – he’s only 27. But seriously, what’s going on here?

5. Running backs relevant…sorta

It’s a passing league these days. Bu, like all you misguided fantasy players who don’t realize that your fantasy football scoring system is flawed, we’re going to give the running backs some love.
A. Foster (US Presswire)
For the youngsters, it will have to be tough love. The two electrifyingly speedy first-round rookie runners who were supposed to transform their respective offenses failed to get the wheels turning Sunday. C.J. Spiller ran the ball seven times for six yards against the Dolphins. The only part of Spiller that looked truly fast was his mind, which seemed to be spinning out of control at times. He was unusually hesitant on contact.

In Detroit (and can you believe we’ve now fit three Lions-Bears bits in this entire piece?) Jahvid Best got 14 carries but amassed only 20 yards. At least Best found the end zone two times.

No need to worry about either young runner at this point – it’s only one week, after all. They’ll get better.

On to the love…

There’s especially no need to worry about the runners in the AFC South. Maurice Jones-Drew gained a hearty 98 yards on 23 carries against the Broncos. Facing a speedy but diminutive Colts run defense that has decided it will be porous again this year, Arian Foster, I think, became the NFL’s first 1,000-yard rusher in 2010. (By the way, Colts fans, no need to worry about your team’s run D– last time the Colts were this bad was 2006, when their SUPER BOWL CHAMPION defense ranked 32nd against the run.) Finally, in Tennessee, Chris Johnson posted 142 yards on 27 carries, which, unfortunately, means he’s behind pace for his ridiculous goal of 2,500 yards rushing on the season.

Most important of all, the teams of these three  running backs all won, creating a huge log-jam atop the AFC South.

6. A star is born

There is a new star in the broadcasting world, and his name is Jim Mora Jr. Thank God Jim Mora Sr.’s son never lead the Seahawks to the PLAYOFFS?! Now we get to listen to Mora call games with Dick Stockton and Charles Davis on Fox each week.

Mora made his television debut in the Falcons-Steelers game. He was extremely intelligent and, for a man ostensibly looking to get back into coaching, he was shockingly blunt. Mora’s best line came during a rant about his friend Bruce Arians calling a pass late in the fourth quarter on second-and-five before the two minute warning. “That play-call was a tragedy”, More said. If you get a chance, tune into a Mora game. You’ll be enlightened and entertained.

7. Redskins don’t win…Cowboys lose

The nice thing about fumbling away seven points on a meaningless play to end the first half is that it is such a huge mistake that no other mistake you make can possibly feel that bad. No matter what, as mistakes go, you simply can’t top that one. Though credit the Cowboys for trying. Specifically, credit Alex Barron. The former first-round pick showed everyone why he landed in Dallas in the first place. Barron wracked up multiple penalties in the second half, including the game-loser on the final play. After the clock struck 0:00, Cris Colinsworth cleverly shared a “get well soon” wish for Marc Colombo.
T. Romo (US Presswire)
It’s too bad we’re highlighting Barron’s mistakes because the man was not utterly awful the entire game. Of course, the Cowboys clearly didn’t trust their makeshift front five to begin with. Virtually every pass Tony Romo threw came off a three-step drop. There was a litany of one-step drop throws (until the final two minutes, some people probably wondered if Dez Bryant actually knew how to run routes, as the Cowboys kept throwing smoke screens to the first-round wideout).

Dallas’ offensive line issues will get fixed once Kyle Kosier and Marc Colombo are healthy. By the way, all this relates well to our next topic (a bonus topic!)…

7.BONUS. Does preseason matters after all?

Probably not. But it’s worth noting that there were three offenses that looked awful in the preseason: Dallas, Carolina and Chicago. Well, the games count now, but these units still stink. The Dallas offense scored seven points in Week 1. The Carolina offense had five turnovers. The Chicago offense had four turnovers and scored only 19 points against a rebuilding Detroit defense. This isn’t enough evidence to overturn the beloved “preseason doesn’t mean a darn thing” axiom, but the continued struggles of these teams are worth pointing out (which we’re doing here).

8. Lightning strikes, so don’t play football?

The Jaguars-Broncos game was delayed 30 minutes during the third quarter because of lightning. This prompted me to send the following email Greg Aiello, head of the NFL’s public relations department:

Hi Greg, we're going to pose this question in our NFL Facts and Rumors Blog, but thought we'd pose it to you guys first: Why does the NFL stop games because of lightning? All we ever hear is that the odds of getting struck by lightning are about the same as the odds of winning the lottery. So why pause a game because of it? Most of the 70,000 fans in attendance can't leave a stadium and get to safe cover that quickly anyway. Is it really worth the major inconvenience? 

(This email was sent after midnight eastern time, so if the league does have a response, it will come after this is published. We’ll throw it up if they send a response.)

9. Problem in Indy?

This is the perfect game for us media folk to blow way out of proportion. The Colts always beat the Texans…until now. The Colts can’t lose when Peyton Manning is on fire…until now. The Texans fit the description of a team on the rise. Etc.

We must be careful not to get carried away about this outcome. But we also must ask the appropriate alarmist question: is Indy’s offensive line a problem? Left tackle Charlie Johnson wound up playing in this game (he’d been out for about a month with a foot injury), but it didn’t matter. Mario Williams dominated far more than his stats (four tackles, one sack) suggest.

And how about this: did you ever in a million years think Peyton Manning would post 40 completions for 433 yards, three touchdowns and zero interceptions in a LOSING effort? What the heck do we make of that?

10. Derek Anderson-Larry Fitzgerald woes

So I decided on Sunday around 6:30 ET to write about how Derek Anderson and Larry Fitzgerald were not on the same page – or not even in the same book, for that matter. Obviously, Fitzgerald’s game-winning 21-yard touchdown reception put a dent in that angle. But not a big enough dent to obliterate it.

I still say the Cardinals have a problem with their passing game. Fitzgerald doesn’t trust Anderson right now – nor should he. Anderson’s accuracy issues were evident several times Sunday. Twelve of the 15 passes thrown Fitzgerald’s way fell incomplete. Fitzgerald’s body language reeked of frustration. And all this was against a hapless Rams secondary.

It’s no surprise the Cardinals begged Kurt Warner to come out of retirement a few days ago.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com