Tag:Super Bowl XLVI
Posted on: February 8, 2012 5:37 pm
Edited on: February 10, 2012 2:51 pm
 

Indy writer on Peyton: His 'arm is a noodle'

Assuming he's healthy, all signs are pointing to Manning playing elsewhere in 2012. (Getty Images)

By Ryan Wilson

Peyton Manning's change in fortune has been swift. Prior to the 2011 season, the general perception of what he meant to Indianapolis went something like this: he had singlehandedly saved the Colts from themselves, led them to a Super Bowl title in 2006, and his accomplishments were the currency that helped fund Lucas Oil Stadium.

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Now, days removed from Super Bowl XLVI -- hosted in Indianapolis by the way -- Manning has gone from patron saint of the city to public enemy No. 1. Maybe that's a slight exaggeration but not by much.

In the weeks prior to the Giants-Patriots matchup, Manning spoke with the Indianapolis Star's Bob Kravitz about his future with the Colts. The takeaway: Peyton had no intentions of retiring, even if his future wasn't with in Indy.

Owner Jim Irsay fired back, calling Manning "a politician," the two then issued a joint statement professing great love and admiration for one another. And that appeared to be that. Neither side spoke in specifics about their situations during Super Bowl Week … until Thursday evening, when Manning's camp leaked word that Manning had been medically cleared to play. This was news to everyone, including Irsay, who tweeted hours later that "Peyton has not passed our physical nor has he been cleared to play for The Indianapolis Colts."

And it was at that point that the public, which had firmly supported Peyton basically since the moment he was drafted in 1998, began to view the franchise quarterback differently.

During a Wednesday appearance on "The Tony Kornheiser Show," Kravitz talked about the he-said, he-said back-and-forth posturing by both camps and what it means for the future of Peyton and the Colts.

"I think people are starting to sway over to Jim Irsay's side on this," Kravitz told Kornheiser. "… It's such a no-brainer. It's been a no-brainer since they went to 0-13. He could give them money to play football. Andrew Luck has got to play, okay? It's not even about the $35 million anymore. I mean, the guy's arm is a noodle, he can't throw like an NFL quarterback, and by March 8, there's no way of knowing whether he's going to be ready or not."

Wow. "Arm is a noodle" is nowhere near "been medically cleared to play." But that doesn't mean Manning won't be healthy at some point. It's just that nobody knows when.

“I know some of the people that have seen him throw,” Kravitz continued. "They say he’s not throwing like an NFL quarterback yet. That doesn’t mean he never will.  This thing is going to take time. Structurally, he’s sound. Structurally, he can take a hit.”

In response to a question from Kornheiser that "Manning hijacked the Super Bowl," Kravitz responded, "I'm quite sure [Peyton] did it deliberately.

"I lost a lot of -- I don't want to say respect for him -- but I was willing to give him the benefit of the doubt and not say that his conversation with me was political and calculated, but there's no doubt in my mind that that story breaking Thursday night right around the time every single TV station is doing an exclusive on Andrew Luck (and, it turns out, blog).

"It comes out on Thursday night about six o'clock -- that doesn't come out unless the Peyton Manning camp wants it to come out. They're putting public pressure on Jim Irsay. It was calculated, it was deceptive, I didn't think it was a good time to do it. And, yes, he absolutely stole the Super Bowl. … I don't think there's any doubt that he stole some of the attention away from the Super Bowl.

"Look, that story was going to be there whether he opened his mouth or not, but he had given us every indication that he was going to go underground and only do his Gatorade and DirecTV thing and then shut the hell up," Kravitz said. "And he didn't do that. I thought that that was kind of smarmy. …

"You got Andrew Luck, just start over, I wish they could make the decision today or tomorrow and move on with it. Instead we're just … holding onto something that doesn't really exist."

So, yeah, if it wasn't obvious before, we think it couldn't be clearer now: Peyton's played his last game for the Colts, and Eli was the last Manning to play in Lucas Oil Stadium during the 2011 season.

Now the only question is if the Redskins are still interested in Manning's services. (Obvious answer: of course they are!)

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Posted on: February 8, 2012 2:56 pm
Edited on: February 8, 2012 3:42 pm
 

Peyton Manning 'couldn't be happier' for Eli

Eli and Peyton are bros. Literally. (Getty Images)
By Will Brinson

It's not crazy to think that Peyton Manning could've been jealous after watching his younger brother Eli Manning win a Super Bowl at Peyton's home stadium in Indianapolis. But Peyton says he's not and that he "couldn't be happier" for Eli.

That's according to Mike Chappelle of the Indianapolis Star, who caught up with Peyton after the Giants Super Bowl win on Sunday.

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"I couldn't be happier for Eli, prouder of Eli," Peyton said. "I want nothing but the best for him. I think he will continue to win more Super Bowls. There is no envy whatsoever in our relationship. He deserves this."

Peyton was asked if there might be a bit of one-upmanship taking place with their relationship, now that Eli has two Super Bowl rings and Peyton "only" has one. But he insisted that's not the sort of dynamic that goes on in the Manning family.

"Eli and I don't play that game," Peyton said. "The relationship of Eli, Cooper and I is not about trying to rub it in or anything like that. It's about love, nothing but love."

We wrote after the game that, regardless of what Peyton says, it still stinks to see your little brother with more Super Bowl wins than you. And we still believe that. But at the same time, it's not like Peyton's endured some horrible NFL career, floundering in Eli's shadow.

If anything, Peyton's probably thrilled that the world's ready to take Eli out of his shadow; if there's one thing that male siblings understand even more than a rivalry, it's protecting one another.

Eli's safe from criticism for quite a while now. In fact, his only concern might be getting asked too often what Peyton will do in the future.

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Posted on: February 8, 2012 12:10 pm
 

Pawngo, Groupon facing big Butterfinger backlash

Pawngo made it rain Butterfingers. (Twitter.com)
By Will Brinson

Earlier on Wednesday, we brought you the story of Pawngo, an online pawn shop company that decided to have a little fun with Boston-area sports fans by dumping some Butterfingers addressed to Wes Welker in the middle of the city. This was designed to make fun of "The Drop" during the Super Bowl.

As you might expect, Patriots fans were just thrilled to be mocked less than 36 hours after the Super Bowl. Wait, what's that? Oh right. Sorry, they got really, really angry about the whole thing. So much so that Pawngo CEO Todd Hills wrote an apology.

"As a die-hard sports fan, I would like to sincerely apologize for a misguided and misdirected stunt that we did yesterday in Boston," Hillis wrote Wednesday. "In delivering a pile of Butterfinger bars to Copley Square in Boston, and a sign referencing Wes Welker, we were making a lighthearted gesture following Sunday’s hard fought game.   We thought that Boston fans would get a laugh out of it.  But,  for many great Boston sports fans, it was taken offensively.  Please accept my most sincere apologies. 

"We got caught up in the moment, reacting to a suggestion that we thought would be funny, but we were wrong, and on behalf of everyone involved with Pawngo, I apologize."

Hills effort is noble, but he quite clearly has no idea about the Boston sports fan demographic. A written apology isn't going to satiate their bloodlust.

Well, at least not before a bunch of them became aware that Groupon, the massive online-coupon company, and Pawngo share investors. Such a realization resulted in a little bit of anger directed at Boston Groupon on Twitter, which resulted in a little bit of corporate speak apology from them:
Does Groupon own Pawngo? We can't tell. (Twitter.com)

Butterfinger would also like you to know they had nothing to do with the stunt:

Butterfinger didn't lay a finger on this stunt. (Twitter.com)

Does this mean that we can put the old "Any press is good press" saying to rest forever?

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Posted on: February 8, 2012 10:33 am
Edited on: February 8, 2012 3:44 pm
 

Jacobs: Gisele needs to 'be cute and shut up'

Jacobs and Gisele are probs not BFFs. (AP)
By Will Brinson

It was really only a matter of time until someone on a football team got mad at Gisele Bundchen for her comments about Tom Brady's inability to catch his own bleeping passes. But no one expected it to be a member of the Giants.

Latest NFL News, Notes

It was though -- Brandon Jacobs came out and, according to the New York Post's Brian Costello, had some words for Mrs. Brady.

"She needs to continue to be cute and shut up," Jacobs said, when asked about Gisele's comments.

Soooooo. I guess we know where Jacobs won't ever be playing, huh? Actually, although Jacobs comments are technically "rude," and certainly out of line, it's his delivery -- and not the message -- that needs tweaking. He just could've phrased things better, like his teammate Osi Umenyiora.

"That’s her husband," Umenyiora said. "I mean she’s supposed to stay out of things like that. But at the end of the day that’s their relationship and she has the right to say whatever she wants to."

That's the thing; it's not like this is a "women have their place" issue, although Jacobs makes it sound that way with his comments. It's just a "don't create a rift between your husband the quarterback and the rest of the team by screaming about how bad they suck to fans and reporters" thing.

It doesn't do anyone any good for the wife of the quarterback to come out and take shots at the quarterback's targets, since it really only serves to recreate a scene out of a sports movie. The results are, almost always, a rift between the quarterback and his teammates.

Except there's usually a few more games to sort their issues out and win the big game.

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Posted on: February 8, 2012 10:22 am
 

Fittest man on Earth Rich Froning talks Crossfit

By Will Brinson

All kinds of athletes and celebrities hang out at Radio Row. One of them this year was Rich Froning, the "Fittest Man in the World." (I was determined to interview him, since I also claim the same title, as you can clearly see from the video playbox below.)

Froning's working with Reebok to prepare for the 2012 Crossfit Games, which take place in July. Crossfit, as far as I understand, is making sure you're in shape across many different sports. Like, you don't want to be a weightlifting monster who can't run 400 yards. And you don't want to be a dude who can run a marathon but can't do a pushup. Etc.

Froning breaks down what it means to be a Crossfit athlete, what kind of exercises he does and what it's like to train on the Empire State Building. (!)



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Posted on: February 8, 2012 9:43 am
Edited on: February 8, 2012 12:04 pm
 

Welker, Boston pranked by dumped Butterfingers

Pawngo made it rain Butterfingers. (Twitter.com)
By Will Brinson

Wes Welker took the Patriots loss harder than anyone else, primarily because he blamed himself for "The Drop" (that's what they're calling it in Boston now, apparently).

So he's probably not going to take a stunt from Pawngo very well: the Denver-based pawn shop company decided to dump thousands of Butterfingers candy bars in Boston's Copley Square with a note.

"Thank you Wes Welker," the note read.

So, yeah, it really makes no sense. We get the "joke," but why are they thanking Welker? Because they got to give away candy? Because the Denver-based Broncos beat the Giants for the Super Bowl? Perhaps it's because their PR firm, 5W Public Relations, was in charge of the stunt and resides in New York?

Maybe that's the logic here, but why wouldn't they sign the note from 5W Public Relations? Did Pawngo authorize this? Why did Pawngo authorize this? It's not like by goofily burning Boston-area sports fans they're going to get any business in New England.

And it's not like New Yorkers, in a rush to appreciate someone being rude, are suddenly only going to do their pawn shopping at Pawngo.

Pawngo CEO Todd Hills released a statement where he said he "thought Boston fans might at least get a laugh out of it."


HaHA! Sigh. Sorry, Todd. Now Pawngo is just "that annoying company who tried to make Boston sports fans mad by giving them free candy." Fortunately they were fined by the city for commercial dumping.

And were it not for Gisele's ridiculous comments, it'd be the single dumbest thing anyone's said/done regarding Welker's drop.

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Posted on: February 7, 2012 11:24 pm
 

Pick-6 Podcast: One last look at Super Bowl XLVI

Revisiting the week that was in Indianapolis: Super Bowl XLVI. (Ryan Wilson, CBSSports.com)

By Will Brinson & Ryan Wilson

The Giants are champs, the Pats are left wondering where it all went wrong, and the 2011 NFL season is officially in the books.

After a whirlwind week of press conferences, Media Day, red-carpet events and, of course, the Super Bowl, we recap our eight days in sunny, temperate Indianapolis (seriously, the only thing better than the weather was the hospitality). 

We start off by talking about the pass -- you know, the one that Wes Welker couldn't pull in and that probably changed the outcome of the game. We also discuss Tom Brady's suddenly tarnished legacy. Somehow, a three-time Super Bowl winner has gone from hero to goat in 20 minutes of uninspiring football (not helping: his supermodel wife blasting the Pats' receivers for not being able to catch). 

And no conversation of Super Bowl week in Indy would be complete without a mention of Peyton Manning and his future, so we hit that too.

Also worth mentioning: we "worked" the Playboy Party Friday night and the highlight of the evening for Brinson was meeting DeAngelo Williams and Jonathan Stewart. We wish we were making this up.

All right, let's get to this...

(Did we mention that you should subscribe to the podcast via iTunes? And if you can't listen to the podcast below, download it here. And if you'd like to keep working while listening in your browser, pop that puppy out in a new tab here.)


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Posted on: February 7, 2012 11:05 pm
 

NFL inadvertently pulls Chrysler Super Bowl ad



By Ryan Wilson


The NFL is vigilant about protecting its product -- namely football -- especially online. That means doggedly ensuring that unlicensed videos are pulled from YouTube as soon as soon as they go up, and that was doubly true during Sunday's Super Bowl. Except that the zero-tolerance policy has some unintended consequences.

For Chrysler, it meant the NFL inadvertently having their Super Bowl ad pulled from YouTube, presumably because it was deemed controversial (inasmuch as it really bothered Karl Rove, anyway).

"This was a big deal for Chrysler," Suzanne Vranica of the Wall Street Journal wrote Monday. "The automaker was one of the few big-game advertisers that didn’t release its Super Bowl commercial prior to the game. That meant it missed out on the millions of dollars in free publicity that other advertisers got from online airings of their ads beforehand. Post-game online availability would have helped make up for that."

So why did the NFL yank the spot? Turns out it was a mistake.

"A third-party vendor monitoring game content mistakingly sent a takedown notice," NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy told Jalopnik.com. "… The vendor thought the ad was part of the halftime programming, which is protected, and not a commercial."

Oy.

Put differently, the NFL was fine with the ad (it even showed up on NFL.com), Chrysler hadn't violated any copyrights, and neither Google (YouTube's parent company) nor NBC (the network that aired the Super Bowl) had an issue with the commercial's message. And yet Chrysler got hosed. But why?

More from Jalopnik:
Someone working on behalf of the NFL — maybe it was an intern at the NFL's social media monitoring company — neither Google nor the NFL will tell us specifically who it is — was apparently tasked with searching for anything related to the game once it started. Specifically, for anything "halftime" related.

It's possible that this person/persons searched through anything on YouTube with the word "Halftime" and sent a form-letter DMCA take-down request. That person was entirely wrong, but it cost Chrysler potentially millions of dollars because the ad was down within minutes after the game.
At the very least, it's a case of someone somewhere working for the NFL overreacting. At worst, it shows that Google's "act first, ask questions later" policy on copyright infringement probably needs to be revisited.

Upside: the commercial is again available on YouTube for everybody to enjoy. Well, everybody but Karl Rove.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com