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Tag:Terrell Owens
Posted on: January 18, 2012 11:48 pm
Edited on: January 19, 2012 11:44 am
 

T.O., with more controversy, will join IFL

T. Owens has made more controversy in an upcoming GQ interview (US Presswire).

By Josh Katzowitz

Terrell Owens, with his money problems and desire to return to the NFL, has had a tough time staying out of the news in his first season out of the NFL. But late Wednesday night, Owens finally had some positive career news to share.

And now, it's official: Owens says he'll return to professional football with the Allen Wranglers of the Indoor Football League.

In a video he posted on Beeyoo.com, Owens proclaimed the following: "Uh-oh, it's official. It just went down. I'm headed back to Texas. That's right. IFL here I come. Allen, Tx., Here I come. I'm gonna be me. Allen, Tx., I'll see you in the end zone."

As we wrote before, players only make $225 per game in the IFL, and they get a bonus for winning. Owens' paycheck, though, figures to be much larger than that, as the Wranglers put out a story on their website last month that said his compensation package could be worth between $250,000-500,000 (it seems likely Owens would have an ownership stake in the franchise if that's the case).

"I'm sure Cowboys fans and all football fans in the area would love to get T.O. back." Wranglers coach Patrick Pimmel said last month. "Terrell would be a great addition to our organization and I hope we can make this happen."

Now, the Wranglers and Owens have. But that doesn't mean Owens isn't still causing controversy of the negative persuasion.

It came to light Wednesday that Owens made an accusation in the February issue of GQ in which he’s said that before he was to read an apology to his Eagles teammates for his behavior in 2005, Jeremiah Trotter told him not to read the section that was intended as an apology to Donovan McNabb.

TO's Problems
Here’s an excerpt of the GQ article that likely will cause many more headaches in Philadelphia:
How about the decision not to publicly apologize to McNabb for suggesting in an interview immediately after the Eagles lost the Super Bowl that the quarterback had “got tired” on the field? For a moment, he is silent. Could he actually be on the verge of admitting he made an error?

“Well, I probably should have done...,” he begins, rubbing his hand along the contours of his massive shaved dome. Then he stops himself. “No. No. Listen, I was in the locker room before the press conference, and my team captain, Jeremiah Trotter, read through that apology they wrote for me. He got to the bottom part, the part where it had the stuff about Donovan, and he did this.” Owens snatches a piece of paper from the table and rips off the bottom three inches. “This is the team leader we’re talking about; he told me not to do it.”

Trotter, not surprisingly, was outraged by the accusation. In a text to the Inquirer on Wednesday night, Trotter wrote that Owens’ quotes were a “super lie.” Then, the former Eagles linebacker tweeted the following to Owens, “yo man y u lying to GQ Mag I never told u that call me ASAP!!!!!”

A few minutes later, Owens responded, “@jtrotter_54 lying about what?” Then, Owens sent Trotter a direct message with his contact information, so I assume the trail on that aspect of this story has run cold.

But Owens also had this to say in the GQ article, “To say I regret anything would be a slap in my grandmother’s face. Are there some things I might do differently now? Sure.”

Apologizing to McNabb apparently is not one of them. At the end of the excerpt, though, Owens got it exactly right. “I am not,” he says, “a tactful person.”

No, but once again, Owens is officially a professional football player. And he has all bunch of new teammates to whom he can be tactless.

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Posted on: January 4, 2012 5:44 pm
 

Judge to T.O.: Your NFL career is over

By Josh Katzowitz

Terrell Owens probably doesn’t need the judicial system to tell him that his NFL career is over -- the speculation that he is seriously considering signing a deal with something called the IFL is a pretty good indication about his future prospects -- but a Los Angeles Superior Court judge did so anyway.

TO's Problems
With Owens in court Wednesday to try to lower his child-support payments, because he’s not making enough money, judge Mark Mariani was rather harsh honest with Owens about his potential to make big money again.

"His NFL career seems to be over. I mean no disrespect,” said Mariani, according to TMZ, which then led Owens apparently to nod his head in acknowledgment.

Owens and his lawyer were in court to try to lower payment on two of his four paternity cases, and while the judge didn’t immediately rule, he did try to encourage Owens by saying he could be inspired by Kurt Warner’s rise from the Arena Football League to the NFL.

At least people have heard of the AFL. Unlike, say, the IFL.

All of which must have lead Owens to wonder: "When the hell is the next season of the T.O. Show starting?"

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Posted on: December 30, 2011 12:12 am
 

Terrell Owens to join the IFL's Allen Wranglers?

OwensBy Josh Katzowitz

Just how low is Terrell Owens willing to go in order to play pro football? Pretty damn low, apparently.

According to the official team website, Owens is close to signing a deal to play with the Allen Wranglers of the Indoor Football League*.

*Whatever the hell that is.

As you should know, Owens hasn’t played since he led the Bengals in receiving in 2010, but he’s remained active (you know, recovering from an ACL tear, getting an arrest warrant issued for supposedly failing to pay child support, having various other money problems, NOT trying to commit suicide, and NOT having NFL teams call).

TO's Problems
But Owens apparently is still jonesing to play football, and he’s willing to play in the very minor leagues in order to possibly pique the interest of an NFL team. Either that, or his money problems are very bad indeed.

Players earn $225 per game in the IFL, and they get a bonus for winning. But Allen** says Owens could earn a compensation package between $250,000-$500,000 (!) if he elects to play.

**Major points to you if you knew where the Wranglers are located. I had to look it up, and the answer is Allen, Texas, not too far north of Dallas.

The Wranglers season begins in February, so if Owens actually signs the deal, it’ll have to be relatively soon.

"I'm sure Cowboys fans and all football fans in the area would love to T.O. back." Wranglers coach Patrick Pimmel said. "Terrell would be a great addition to our organization and I hope we can make this happen."

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Posted on: November 13, 2011 9:08 am
Edited on: November 13, 2011 9:26 am
 

DeSean Jackson misses meeting, won't play Sunday

JacksonPosted by Josh Katzowitz

DeSean Jackson has had a rough year. He’s been clamoring for a contract extension for the past two years, and he’s not playing well in the ultra-important final year of his deal (he’s making just $600,000). Earlier this year, Terrell Owens, not necessarily a guy you want to take advice from when dealing with money situations, said Jackson should sit out games in protest.

Today, Jackson won’t have a choice in the matter.

According to the Philadelphia Daily News, Jackson completely missed a team meeting Saturday, and the team has told him he won’t be active for today’s game vs. the Cardinals.

It’s a season that has quickly turned into a nightmare for Jackson – who, according to ESPN’s Adam Schefter missed the Saturday morning special teams meeting because his alarm didn’t go off and he overslept.

Jackson has been outspoken about wanting a new deal, and though the Eagles have said in the past that he deserves a new contract, he didn’t get one last year because of complications with the expiring CBA. Even though there’s a new agreement, that doesn’t mean he’s on the verge of getting a new deal right now.

Especially since he’s been rendered irrelevant for much of the season, making 29 receptions for 503 yards and two touchdowns while dropping passes and losing his ability as a deep threat.

“The defenses are trying to take away what we do best,” Jackson said this week. “We’ve got to be able to figure it out. Myself, at times, it’s frustrating, because I am used to making the big plays, scoring long touchdowns, things like that, but right now, it’s not really working. Defenses are not letting it happen. We’ve just got to figure it out.”

The acrimony between Jackson and the Eagles isn’t new. He raised eyebrows earlier this year when he said his health was his most important priority while winning games for the Eagles was No. 2*. Basically, he was saying he didn’t want to hurt himself only to lose out on his potential for a big new contract.

*Jackson isn’t the only player in the NFL who feels this way, but for him to verbalize it was a little surprising and probably not very business savvy.

And now, he’s becoming a bigger problem for the Eagles, who still have plenty of talent on offense but now have to deal with the fact their No. 1 receiver can’t bother to wake up for team meetings.

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Posted on: November 4, 2011 8:15 pm
Edited on: November 4, 2011 8:16 pm
 

Report: Warrant issued for Terrell Owens

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

If Terrell Owens’ biggest problem was the fact he couldn’t find a job, life would be grand. But now he’s got bigger problems than his unemployment.

As TMZ reports, a California judge has issued an arrest warrant for Owens after he failed to show up for a child support hearing.

We told you a few days ago that Owens had asked to reduce his child support payments, because he’s not making as much money today as he was before. Therefore, he can’t pay as much in child support. Or none at all, as Monique Reynolds, who is taking Owens to court for back payments, claims in court.

TO's Problems
Owens apparently knew he was not going to show up for his court appearance -- it was right around the time of his workout in which zero NFL teams showed up to watch -- and he apparently tried to reschedule, but Reynolds’ representation refused.

And if Owens thought he could catch on with an NFL team in order to earn some money, Bengals safety Chris Crocker, Owens’ former teammate, said he can understand why nobody seems interested.

“When we talk about how perception is reality, the perception around the league is that he’s a bad locker room guy and a bad teammate,” Crocker said in this week’s Five Questions (or more). “Organizations don’t want to bring that dynamic in the locker room, especially with him 37 or 38 years old. I just don’t think people are willing to do it. I’m not saying he’s a bad teammate, but he was called one when he was in San Fran, in Philly, in Dallas. It’s like a circus. Teams just don’t want to go that route. You bring him in, and you bring in all the stuff that goes with it.”

Hopefully, “all that stuff” doesn’t include becoming a deadbeat dad.

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Posted on: November 4, 2011 10:25 am
Edited on: November 4, 2011 10:26 am
 

Five questions (or more) with Chris Crocker

C. Crocker has been a key defender in Cincinnati (Getty).

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Chris Crocker has played on good Bengals teams and bad Bengals teams. Mostly bad. But now that Cincinnati is 5-2, Crocker is receiving a bit more recognition for being a key component on a Bengals squad that has one of the league’s best defenses. After starting only six games during his first years in Cleveland, he’s started 83 of the last 89 contests he’s played, and he’s had himself a nice career. Seven games into this season, he’s already surpassed his career high with 2.5 sacks on the year.

He’s also one of the better quotes in the Bengals locker room, always willing to speak about whatever’s on his mind with nary a nod to the idea of political correctness. That’s not to say he’s in the same league as former teammates Chad Ochocinco or Terrell Owens. Those guys talked because they liked to hear themselves speak. When Crocker speaks, he usually has something interesting to say.

Knowing that, we caught up with Crocker earlier this week where we talked about life in the Bengals organization this year, how the team moved past the Carson Palmer controversy and why Owens can’t get a job.

Previous Five Questions (or more):

Sept. 16:
Actor/former Patriots DB Brian White

Sept. 30: Bills RB Fred Jackson

Oct. 7: Sweetness author Jeff Pearlman

Oct. 21: 49ers LB Aldon Smith

1. CBSSports.com: I was around that locker room for six years, and I know what that organization is like and what the mood in the locker room has been when the team’s been bad. What’s different this year?

Chris Crocker: I can talk specifically on defense where the majority of the guys are the same guys who have been here. Offensively, we’ve changed a lot of guys. We already had really good guys the locker room. It’s just been what the perception has been. We don’t have a Chad (Ochocinco) anymore that’s always in the media. All of our guys are low-key. We don’t have the guys who are in the limelight. The perception has changed. A lot of the guys we had before were getting into trouble with DUIs and suspensions. We’ve always had a good group of guys. We just don’t have any more Hollywood.

2. CBS: I don’t think I was alone in the national media in picking the Bengals to struggle, to go maybe 4-12 or 3-13. That obviously wasn’t right, but if you looked at what was happening, Carson Palmer was maybe going to go, the top two receivers from last year would leave, and we didn’t know why Marvin Lewis came back. Why are you guys winning?

Crocker: Offensively, we haven’t been very good since I’ve been here. I’m not saying that to kick my teammates in the butt. The truth of the matter is we haven’t been great. The defense, we felt like we were the strength of the team. No matter what, we felt like we had to carry our team. It just so happened that we stumbled on a quarterback that could manage the game, we’re very talented at the wide receiver spot, and Cedric (Benson) re-signed. Everything really jelled on the offensive side of the ball. We knew we were going to play stingy defense. But the (offensive) formula has worked for us. There were a lot of questions -- who’s going to be the quarterback, the running back, the receivers, and on defense we had questions too. But we felt like the nucleus was the same. Outside of these walls, nobody saw us as good. But every year, nobody sees us as good, so why should it be any different?

C. Crocker said the team doesn't have any Hollywood this year (US Presswire).3. CBS: But losing Johnathan Joseph to the Texans was a major thing, right? I mean, Joseph and Leon Hall were considered to be one of the better young cornerback tandems in the league.

Crocker: Going into the season, it was a big blow. Me and Leon and John have all been together. We had formed something that was really special. He leaves to go elsewhere, which is fine. He was entitled to do that. But what we were going to do? Nate Clements was a free agent, and he fit right in. He’s been a great player in this league for a while. For him coming in, it was just a matter of time. How long would it take him to learn the system and get on the same page? It’s been really good. You couldn’t have put a better guy in there.

CBS: Why did it fit Clements so well?

Crocker: First of all, experience supersedes everything. He’s a very smart guy. He really wanted to come in here and really get on the same page with everybody. He wasn’t coming here with the attitude that he’s been there and done that. He came in with the attitude that he could learn. It’s hard when you’re an old guy, you get stuck in your ways. But he was completely opposite of that. He wanted to be part of something special. But with us, it’s week to week. If we don’t play well the next week, then we’re a piece of crap. Especially in the media. We want to go out there and play well.

CBS: Yeah, but us in the media can also say, “Well, the Bengals really haven’t faced any great quarterbacks. They haven’t really played anybody yet. Their schedule is weak. They haven’t played Baltimore or Pittsburgh yet."

Crocker: When people say that, you know that you don’t ever apologize for winning. Those other guys in the division, they’re playing the same teams we are. You don’t apologize for winning in this league. We’ll see those guys down the road and see where we stand then.

4. CBS: Regarding Carson Palmer, what was the locker room attitude about him? He had been such a good member of the team, but then he bailed. Did Carson abandon you guys, or did he have a good point?

Crocker: In Cincinnati in general, he had been the quarterback for so long, maybe the fans and the organization were scared of change. Sometimes change is good. In this case, it works out for us. If he didn’t want to be here, that’s fine. It’s all good and dandy. We knew our offense wasn’t the 1999 St. Louis Rams. Let’s be real. We weren’t playing John Elway. I like Carson, but let’s look at what we were.

5. CBS: What about Terrell Owens? You played with him last year, saw him in practice. Does he still have what it takes? Why doesn’t he have a job?

Crocker: I’ll say this. When we talk about how perception is reality, the perception around the league is that he’s a bad locker room guy and a bad teammate. Organizations don’t want to bring that dynamic in the locker room, especially with him 37 or 38 years old. I just don’t think people are willing to do it. I’m not saying he’s a bad teammate, but he was called one when he was in San Fran, in Philly, in Dallas. It’s like a circus. Teams just don’t want to go that route. You bring him in, and you bring in all the stuff that goes with it. He seems healthy, he looks healthy. I’m not a GM, but it’s something you worry about.

CBS: Was it a circus last year with Owens and Ochocinco?

Crocker: I’ll go off what he said. He talks so bad about organizations that nobody wants to deal with that. You bring him in here, and it’s all good. But when it goes bad, he talks bad about the organization. My only rule is this: you might have gripes and you might not be happy, but you don’t bite the hand that feeds you. I think that’s how organizations feel about him.

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Posted on: October 31, 2011 1:44 pm
 

Report: TO asks for lower child support payments

Owens

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

The Terrell Owens saga continues to get more bizarre. And more sad.

He’s seemingly unwanted for employment by any NFL team, and there have been reports he might have tried to commit suicide (his PR team has strongly denied that).

And he’s apparently having money problems. Enough where TMZ is reporting that he’s asked a judge to lower his child support payments.

Apparently, Owens wants to reduce the payments because he’s not making enough money right now. According to one of Owens’ PR reps, “His child support payments should mirror his income today and not be based on his income from over four years ago."

He was supposed to be in court on Oct. 24 for a child support modification hearing, but he missed it and now, the lawyers for one of the women he owes have declined to reschedule.

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Posted on: October 27, 2011 9:12 pm
 

Owens PR rep: He did NOT try to commit suicide

OwensPosted by Josh Katzowitz

Earlier today, we brought you the story of Terrell Owens and the 911 call that emerged from the night his assistant told a dispatcher that she believed he had tried to commit suicide.

Now, Owens -- make that Owens’ PR rep -- has spoken out. He was not trying to kill himself. Instead, he had taken a sleeping pill and was unresponsive as a result.

Owens’ assistant on the night of Oct. 6 called emergency services and said Owens had taken four prescription pain pills. When the operator asked if Owens was awake, the caller said, “Barely … we talk to him and he understands what we're saying."

When the dispatcher asked if it was a suicide attempt, she said, “Yes, I believe so."

But Owens’ PR rep said that wasn’t the case.

Diana Bianchini told TMZ the following: “Terrell Owens absolutely did not attempt suicide nor did he attempt to overdose on pills on Oct. 6, 2011.

"The facts are that [T.O.'s assistant] arrived at his home that evening after he had already taken a sleeping aid to fall asleep. He was unresponsive because of this.

"Unaware he had taken a sleeping aid prior to her arrival, his assistant became concerned and decided to call 911.

"When the ambulance and police arrived, Owens was responsive and was not held in the hospital. Reports released with the 911 call today are misleading and not factual."

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com