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Tag:Arizona Cardinals
Posted on: September 12, 2010 2:59 pm
Edited on: September 12, 2010 3:03 pm
 

Beanie Wells officially inactive for Sunday

Posted by Will Brinson

Beanie Wells, the Cardinals starting running back, is inactive for the team's game against the Rams on Sunday afternoon.

Wells had been considered "probably doubtful" (or some such term) for most of the week with a knee injury that's been called at times a "bruise" and at others a "sprain." Clearly the injury is worse than a "bruise" if he's being held out of the game, although the news that he won't play is hardly shocking.

It is pretty tough for the Cardinals, however, who will have to lean heavily on Tim Hightower ... or Derek Anderson. (So, yeah, Tim Hightower.)

Wells being out is also a tough blow for fantasy owners, who should have watched Fantasy Football Today (it starts at 11 AM every Sunday!) in order to figure out who to start instead of Wells.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed .
Posted on: September 11, 2010 7:56 pm
Edited on: September 11, 2010 7:59 pm
 

Podcast: Week 1 late game previews

Posted by NFL Facts & Rumors staff

Andy Benoit joins Will Brinson to preview the second slate of games on the first NFL weekend. Can the numerous ex-Niners among the Seattle crew help the Seahawks overcome inexperience? Will the Aaron Rodgers v. Kevin Kolb matchup be the most exciting quarterback battle of the first week? Would you rather have Derek Anderson or Sam Bradford starting? All those questions -- and more -- answered for your previewing pleasure.


If you can't view the podcast, click here to download .
Or, make it easy on yourself and  Subscribe via iTunes .


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Posted on: September 11, 2010 4:41 pm
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Posted on: September 11, 2010 12:27 pm
Edited on: September 11, 2010 12:30 pm
 

Hot Routes 9.11.10 tying loose ends before Wk 1

Posted by Andy Benoit

 
Seahawks linebacker Aaron Curry and 49ers tight end Vernon Davis will apparently be renewing a rivalry when their teams square off Sunday.


The Bills signed former Jaguar/Cowboy/Dolphin linebacker Akin Ayodele, a veteran who is well-experienced playing in a 3-4 scheme.

Darrelle Revis and Charles Woodson both recently signed lucrative deals. The Denver Post reports that Champ Bailey could be next. Bailey could sign an extension that would keep him with the Broncos through 2014 (he’ll be 36).

Is it fair to point out that Vikings safety Tyrell Johnson, an athletic second-round pick whom the team probably would have been willing to draft late in Round One, lost his starting job to Husain Abdullah, an undrafted guy who didn’t eat or drink anything during training camp?


Joshua Cribbs is making more of a mark at wide receiver.

Looks like Beanie Wells will be out for Week 1.

Redskins safety Kareem Moore is bouncing back quicker than expected from his August 23 arthroscopic knee surgery. Reed Doughty is still expected to start against the Cowboys.

Is Kevin Mawae a Hall of Famer?

Panthers linebacker Thomas Davis is eyeing a midseason return after suffering his second ACL injury in seven months this past spring. The Panthers aren’t ruling him out – he’s only PUP at this point.

Raiders running back Michael Bush is questionable for Sunday with a fractured thumb.

Ed Bouchette of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette believes Ben Roethlisberger will start Game 5 no matter what.


Normally we don’t share stories about parking arrangements for games, but this one is somewhat interesting because the Royals and Chiefs have a rare doubleheader Monday.



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Posted on: September 9, 2010 9:45 am
Edited on: September 9, 2010 4:33 pm
 

Hot Routes 9.9.10: NFC Week 1 injury rundown

Posted by Andy Benoit

Filling you in on some of the noteworthy midweek injury news...

Some truly great news for the Giant: strong safety Kenny Phillips will be in the starting lineup against the Panthers Sunday. Phillips is coming off microfracture knee surgery. If healthy, he’s one of the most electrifying safeties in the game.

The Cowboys also got their safety, Gerald Sensabaugh, back. He’s been out with a foot injury.K. Phillips (US Presswire)

The Cowboys, Giants and Eagles all have injury news along their offensive line . The Cowboys will likely be without right tackle Marc Colombo (knee) and left guard Kyle Kosier (knee). The Eagles are getting center Jamaal Jackson back. (ACL) The Giants are getting center Shaun O’Hara back (Achilles). 

Lions safety Louis Delmas missed practice Wednesday. So did middle linebacker DeAndre Levy. Both have strained groin muscles . These are the two best athletes on Detroit’s iffy defense (not counting Ndamukong Suh). Delmas’s presence is especially crucial given the ineptitude of the Lions secondary.

Bears rookie Major Wright has returned to practice three weeks after having surgery to repair a fractured finger. Wright was drafted to start immediately at free safety, though it’s likely he’ll come off the bench in Week 1. If he does, then Danieal Manning should start in centerfield. (Chris Harris will be the strong safety.)

Cardinals running back Beanie Wells did not practice Wednesday due to a knee injury . Wells is expected to play against the Rams on Sunday though.

Larry Fitzgerald should be good to go after taking a knee to the helmet against the Texans a few weeks ago.


Rams safety James Butler is sidelined with a knee injury. The Rams ultimately need Butler, though they’re confident that Craig Dahl, despite his limited range, can hold down the strong safety duties in the short term.

San Francisco’s best pass-rusher, outside linebacker Ahmed Brooks, has not yet recovered from a lacerated kidney (doesn’t that injury just sound awful)? He’s out this week.

Either Chester Pitts or Tyler Polumbus will start at left tackle for Seattle’s injured first-round rookie Russell Okung (high ankle sprain).

For the Panthers, Geoff Schwartz will almost certainly start for injured right tackle Jeff Otah (ankle).

Bucs quarterback Josh Freeman missed practice Wednesday because of his fractured right thumb , but he’s apparently long been scheduled to miss that particular practice anyway. Freeman will still be under center against the Browns Sunday.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow  @cbssportsnfl   on Twitter   and subscribe to our  RSS Feed .

Posted on: September 8, 2010 9:48 am
 

Hot Routes 9.8.10: Well, how big a boy are you?

Posted by Will Brinson

Originally I was going to try and get a full post out of Suh and Larry (via Suh's Twitter account, seen right) and the whole "big boy" thing was aimed at Deuce (see: No. 2 below). Then I realized that it was something the Cable Guy might say and that I definitely don't have 300 words in my brain that revolve around that picture.

We will, however, accept captions in the comments or via twitter (@CBSSportsNFL) , where you may also send tips for the Hot Routes.
  • Deuce Lutui will get loose at right guard for Arizona , despite heavy concerns (literally) about his weight keeping him from performing at an expected level. Said Lutui, it's "not the first time I've been called fat. It's one of those things, as a big boy, you have to live with."
  • My buddy RJ Bell of Pregame.com points out that the Colts are expected to be favored in 15 of their 16 games this year (the lone exception being their game at New England), while the Lions are only expected to be favored in ONE game, when they play the Rams in Week 5 at home. These expectations, remember, don't judge future performance (necessarily) ... just expectations.
  • So, there's apparently a chance that Tim Tebow might not play in Jacksonville, as according to the Denver Post , he and Brady Quinn are still battling it out for the No. 2 quarterback spot. There might be a full-on revolt at Everbank Stadium if that happens.
  • Hue Jackson, the Raiders offensive coordinator, helped get T.J. Houshmandzadeh from Seattle to Baltimore. Weird .
  • Big Blue View takes a look at the 2009 Giants draft class and decides that it might be nice to take a mulligan on that one, even if Hakeem Nicks is pretty talented. Unfortunately, well, you know how mulligans work in the NFL.
Posted on: September 7, 2010 4:34 pm
Edited on: September 7, 2010 4:37 pm
 

The blackout problem is not going away

Posted by Andy Benoit

Q. What do you get when you combine a rough economy with an ever-improving home television viewing experience?

A. Blackouts. An alarming number of blackouts.

Sean Leahy of USA Today recently shed some light on the potential blackout problem NFL teams are facing in 2010. Last season, 22 regular season games (8.6 percent of games) were blacked out, which was a five-year high for the league. Five teams had home games blacked out: Detroit, Jacksonville, Kansas City, St. Louis and Oakland.

This season, 11 teams, including ’09 playoff clubs San Diego, Cincinnati and Arizona, could be facing blackouts. Tampa Bay is expected to lead the league in ’10 blackouts; their first could come in the Season Opener against Cleveland. Leahy writes, “Last year the Buccaneers took advantage of blackout loophole by which teams can buy back unsold tickets at a reduced rate in order for the game to air locally. This season, (Bucs spokesman) Jonathan Grella said the team won't do that.

For games to be on TV, Grella said, "people need to understand that it's not a given."

It’s worth noting that the blackout problems are generally impacting only the less established teams. Classic organizations like Pittsburgh, Chicago, Dallas, Green Bay, San Francisco, Miami, Washington, etc. have either already sold out all eight games in 2010 or are on the cusp of selling out all eight games. And popular teams like Philadelphia, New England, Indianapolis, Minnesota and Baltimore are selling out, too.

That said, the blackout problem will get worse if changes aren’t eventually made. Think about it: going to a game costs hundreds of dollars. You’re stuck in traffic for hours beforehand and after. You usually wind up committing eight hours of your day to the experience. The game is exciting, except for the frequent commercial breaks where you sit around and look at nothing. If you’re lucky, you’ll have a good view of the field. And, if you’re even luckier, you won’t be sitting next to a noisy moron or drunkard.

On the other side of the equation…for roughly the cost of taking your family to an NFL game, you can order DirecTV’s Sunday Ticket and see every game for the entire season. You watch from home (likely on a big HD screen) and determine the nature of your own environment. You see more than you would have seen at the game live (better view, replays, close-up shots of players and coaches), and it only costs about three hours of your day. No driving home, no facing traffic and no standing in line at the restroom. Better yet, if you’re a hardcore NFL fan, you aren’t limited to watching just one game.
With the Collective Bargaining negotiations on the horizon and owners needin
g to figure out how to distribute revenue, the league needs to take special notice of the blackout markets. If blackouts become the norm for lower-echelon teams (especially lower-echelon teams in newer NFL markets like Tampa, Jacksonville, Charlotte, Phoenix, etc.), the NFL could start to develop its own versions of the Kansas City Royals or Pittsburgh Pirates.

A huge factor in the NFL’s success has been how even its bottom-feeder clubs are relevant. Relevancy is hard to maintain when no one can see the games.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed .
Posted on: September 7, 2010 1:42 pm
Edited on: September 7, 2010 1:45 pm
 

Week 1 Top Ten with a Twist: front offices

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

The front office, like most of the players it pays, doesn’t take much of an offseason. The general managers and the other executives – player personnel and otherwise – are constantly remodeling the team. Get rid of the guy who’s too slow for the system, sign to an extension the cornerback who could be the league’s next breakout star, fire the coach who’s taken the team as far as he can, draft the perfect offensive lineman for the team’s scheme, etc.

And like the players you watch every week, these front offices are to be judged. In the first of our weekly Top Ten with a Twist, I’m grading out the front offices. Without further ado, here’s the list:

Top 10 Front Office Performances from 2010 Offseason

10. Chiefs: Second-year coach Todd Haley, after a rough first year in which he worked his team to the bone, has been more pleasant this offseason. He’s even been spotted … gasp … smiling. That’s probably because the front office, led by GM Scott Pioli, made his team better. Kansas City signed Thomas Jones – you know, the guy who was the NFL’s third-leading rusher last year before the Jets parted ways with him – and they had a good draft. Eric Berry and Javier Arenas will make a big impact in the secondary and Dexter McCluster will be a standout on offense. The Chiefs won’t sniff .500 this year, but they’re headed that way.M. Tannenbaum (US Presswire)
 
9. Raiders: Yes, Al Davis still makes bizarre decisions (he reportedly was the only one who wanted to keep Mike Mitchell and cut Steve Brown at safety that turned cutdown day into a confusing series of events), but the most important one this front office made was to rid themselves of JaMarcus Russell and to bring in Jason Campbell. Campbell will never be an elite quarterback, but he could lead Oakland back to respectability (meaning they’ll have a chance to go 8-8). Simply for getting rid of Russell, that makes the front office a shoe-in for this list, but they also drafted LB Rolando McClain with the first-round pick - they thought so much of him they traded away Kirk Morrison – and added LB Kamerion Wimbley.
 
8. Cardinals: While I absolutely hate the Derek-Anderson-is-starting-at-QB move, Arizona had a solid offseason. It let Matt Leinart go finally after it was clear he was never going to make it, but most importantly, it didn’t give in to Darnell Docket’s repeated requests during the past few seasons for contract extensions, not wanting to set a bad precedent by giving him an extension when he still had more than two years on his deal. But just before this season was to begin, the team rewarded him and possibly made him a Cardinal for life. Just for not folding, they’re in my top-10. Now, if the front office could just keep him from videotaping himself while in the shower …
 
7. Bengals: They had a good draft, selecting TE Jermaine Gresham, DE Carlos Dunlap, WR Jordan Shipley, CB Brandon Ghee and DL Geno Atkins, all of whom should get some (or plenty of) playing time. Further playing into the stereotype that the club is the NFL’s version of the Betty Ford Clinic, owner Mike Brown also brought in WR Terrell Owens and CB Adam Jones (you know him better as Pacman). Both moves could backfire, but they also could be outstanding. I’ll give major points off because the Antonio Bryant signing was a disaster (they spent $8 million and got only a couple practices out of him) and because they, for some strange reason, haven’t locked up a new contract with Marvin Lewis. If they lose him, there’s no way Cincinnati is back on this list next year.
 
6. Lions: Look, their defense has been terrible the last few years, and sure, the addition of star-in-waiting Ndamukong Suh in the first round of the draft was a no-brainer pick. But considering the number of occasions the Lions have screwed up their first-round selection, this one was actually the right move. Then, they got RB Jahvid Best later in the first round, and if concussions don’t prove to be a problem for him, that’s a nice pick. Adding WR Nate Burleson will help WR Calvin Johnson and QB Matt Stafford, as well. The defense probably still will struggle, but hey, at least Detroit is on the right rack. That’s not something you can always say going into a new season.
 
5. Vikings: Yes, the front office emasculated itself by outright begging Brett Favre to return to the team (pretty, pretty please), but ultimately, the Vikings knew they needed to make this happen. They needed Favre, because they obviously don’t trust Tarvares Jackson. I like the sixth-round Joe Webb pick quite a bit, and I like the trade of Sage Rosenfels even better. The trade for former Dolphins WR Greg Camarillo was a great addition when it was unclear what would happen with Sidney Rice and Percy Harvin. The Vikings know there’s no time like the present (especially when Favre is leading your squad), and they’re acting like it.
 
4. Seahawks: If we were going with the quantity over quality award, Seattle would be No. 1 without question. It started with the hiring of Pete Carroll, though I’m not sure he’s the right answer as the head coach (it’s hard to get an image of Carroll parachuting out of a sinking USC meteorite and landing softly and safely in the Pacific Northwest). He’s helped remake the roster through the draft (Russell Okung, Earl Thomas and Golden Tate) and through (what seems like) hundreds of other moves. I really don’t like paying so much money for backup QB Charlie Whitehurst, and I hate that the team has to pay most of T.J. Houshmandzadeh’s salary while he’s playing in Baltimore (hey, not every single one of those thousands of offseason transactions can work perfectly). But newly-acquired RB Leon Washington looks recovered from his knee injury and WR Mike Williams looks to be resurgent.
 
3. Ravens: I love the Marc Bulger signing (even if Joe Flacco doesn’t). WR Anquan Boldin also will prove to be a very good addition, and now with Houshmandzadeh in the mix, they’ll battle with the Bengals for the AFC North crown. I don’t think Baltimore is the favorite, but, with GM Ozzie Newsome in its corner, there’s no reason to think the Ravens won’t return to the playoffs. They’ve had some bad luck with their secondary, but I’m not sure how much else the front office could have done to improve it. The rest of the team will simply have to cover for the defensive backs.
 
2. Redskins: Above all else, they hired Mike Shanahan to run the team. This club has made some baffling decisions the past few years – none more so than handing Albert Haynesworth $100 million – but hiring Shanahan to show Haynesworth who is boss and trading for Donovan McNabb, who still has gas in his fuel tank, were good moves. How LT Trent Williams performs – the Redskins chose him over Russell Okung – will be a big factor in how well Washington plays this year. They’re not going to win the division, but they’ll be better than their 4-12 record from a season ago.

1. Jets: I’ve made no apologies for my thoughts that the Jets could play for the Super Bowl. Yeah, they weren’t great last year, at least until they got in the playoffs, but the front office has improved the team heading into this season. They brought in Antonio Cromartie to start next to Darrelle Revis, and they drafted another CB Kyle Wilson in the first round. They’ve taken care of three of their Core Four, and even if the timetable with Revis wasn’t ideal, at least the deal got done. Plus, the front office extended the contracts of Rex Ryan and Mark Tannenbaum when it didn’t have to do so (some see this as a negative, but I like the forward thinking). The jury is still out on LaDainian Tomlinson, but as a No. 2 RB who’s not overly expensive, I don’t mind the risk at all. The Jets are acting like they want to win the super bowl. How could you not love that?

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com