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Tag:Brett Favre
Posted on: November 17, 2011 12:09 pm
 

Driver prefers 'patient' Rodgers to Favre

Posted by Will Brinson



The Aaron Rodgers and Brett Favre debate, for some reason, is gaining steam right now. Perhaps it has to do with all the "undefeated season" and "unprecedented quarterback play" talk about Rodgers right now.

Or perhaps it has to do with Donald Driver's comments on Wednesday night, in which he compared the two quarterbacks.

"I've played with two quarterbacks," Driver said Wednesday on the NFL Network, via USA Today. "One just went out there and did what he did, and he wasn't patient at all. But Aaron takes what the defense gives him, and that's the type of guy you want."

It's worth noting that what Driver said isn't an "Aaron Rodgers is amazing and soooo much better than Brett Favre comment." But it is an astute observation about how the two handle their job -- Rodgers is more patient and less prone to throwing interceptions. (As was Greg Jennings comment that "we didn't go all the way with Brett.")

By the end of this season, should the Packers go undefeated and win a second straight Super Bowl, it may be pointless to debate between Favre and Rodgers anyway.

But maybe not -- Tom Silverstein has an excellent piece in Thursday's Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel where he reminds the world that Favre wasn't exactly a bad quarterback when he played. That sounds silly, but it's worth noting, because oftentimes the greatness of Favre is lost on the world because of the way he left the sport.

It's easy and, really, part of human nature, to have later memories clot out earlier ones. When many folks think of Favre, they think of a helicopter trailing his SUV as he returned from Hattiesburg to play for the Vikings. Or they think of purple. Or Crocs.

They don't think, as Silverstein notes, of the 16-game stretch in 1995 and 1996 (two of his three consecutive MVP years) where he threw a ridiculous 49 touchdowns and just seven interceptions.

Favre was so good, he qualified for the rare "Do not bet against [athlete] on [primetime sports event]" category. Like Michael Jordan any time he stepped on the court, if you bet against Favre on Monday night, you were losing money. It's easy to forget that now, but Favre was amazing.

So maybe it's even more of a reason to throughly enjoy what Rodgers is doing right now.

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Posted on: November 14, 2011 11:48 pm
 

Packers D joins offense in Monday night rout

Posted by Will Brinson



Not breaking news: Aaron Rodgers is pretty awesome. Also not breaking: the Green Bay Packers are really good. They showed as much on Monday night by breaking out the whupping stick against the Vikings and beating Minnesota 45-7 at Lambeau to improve to 9-0 on the season.

Rodgers was nearly perfect (again) Monday, completing 23 of 30 passes for 250 yards and four touchdowns. The raw accumulation of his stats doesn't really tell the story, though, because Rodgers was out of the game with 10 minutes left, and backup Matt Flynn actually was perfect, going 2/2 for 38 yards a touchdown.

Week 10 Wrapup

The Packers defense is the bigger story though, because they were markedly improved from previous weeks -- defensive coordinator Dom Capers got aggressive after Christian Ponder, as Clay Matthews nearly matched his season total with a pair of sacks on the Vikings rookie quarterback.

Green Bay didn't allow a single point from Minnesota in the first half and Capers unit also limited Adrian Peterson to just 51 yards on 14 carries, although in fairness to Peterson's game, there wasn't really ever a chance for Minnesota to get their offense going, after Randall Cobb took a punt return 80 yards for a touchdown following Minnesota's three-and-out to start the game.

The only points the Packers did allow were a touchdown from Peterson that occurred only after Cobb muffed a punt in the third quarter, giving Minnesota the ball on Green Bay's 14-yard line.

Obviously the Vikings aren't the NFL's most elite offense, but as we've seen with other would-be teams around the league, it's possible to trip up against lesser opponents.

The Packers didn't flinch once, and judging by their decision to keep running passing plays out of the shotgun, inside Minnesota's red zone, while up 30-plus points, their only concern is winning every single game the rest of the season.

If the defense progresses like it did on Sunday over the next few games, that's a distinct possibility, because there's no reason to think the offense is going to slow down at any point.

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Posted on: November 10, 2011 11:36 am
 

Top Ten with a Twist: Second-half predictions

Green Bay is being predicted to win the Super Bowl (US Presswire).

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

We’re halfway through the season, and since so few of my preseason predictions will come true (seriously?!? The Rams to win the NFC West? Chris Johnson as the comeback player?), I’ve decided to give it another go in hopes that I don’t have to bring my prediction machine into the shop for a tune-up.

Aside from our new, guaranteed to be true picks (you can also check out our CBS expert chat from Wednesday in that link), I’m going out on a limb with this Top Ten with a Twist and giving you 10 predictions that I know in my heart of hearts WILL happen the rest of the season.

Because the great thing about working for a national website, as opposed to a newspaper that gets filed into the recycling bin as soon as you’re done reading it, is that there’s no way anybody will ever know if your predictions turn out to be crap. Oh, wait …

10. The Bills will fall apart: One of the league’s most surprising teams -- though Fred Jackson says you shouldn’t have been THAT surprised by it -- played perhaps its worst game of the season against the wrong opponent last week, losing to the Jets at home and falling into a tie for first place in the AFC East with the Jets and Patriots. Buffalo has to play both teams once more, and though Buffalo should finish with a winning record, that won’t be enough to finish ahead of New England and New York and make the playoffs.

9. The Lions won’t: Detroit’s success hasn’t been nearly as surprising as Buffalo’s, but the fact Detroit is 6-2 through the first half of the season isn’t something we’re used to seeing. But the Lions are legitimately a playoff team. They’re third in the league in points scored -- that can happen when your former No. 1 pick stays healthy (so far) and your top-notch wide receiver scores touchdowns by the bushel. The Lions, even though Ndamukong Suh hasn’t been at his best, still maintain a top-10 defense. Though the second-half schedule is tough, Detroit has a good chance of knocking off Green Bay (the two teams play twice), and if the Lions can stay ahead of the Bears, one wild card spot will be waiting for them.

8. New England will right the ship: The Patriots, despite losing their past two games and looking bad in the process, should still make the playoffs. So, from that aspect, they’ll be good enough. Just not as good as they usually are. That’s because their defense is a major problem (Albert Haynesworth, you’ll recall, was on the roster for eight weeks), and it’s unclear how New England will fix it. But the offense is good enough to survive the second half of their schedule. They won’t get a first-round bye, and they probably won’t survive wild card weekend. So, the season basically will be an abject failure in New England’s eyes.

7. The Colts will win a game (or two): Indianapolis will not be the second team in NFL history to go 0-for-16 on the year. Already, they’ve lost four games by eight points or less, and yes, even though that 62-7 loss to the Saints was ridiculous, Indianapolis (and quarterback Curtis Painter) is good enough to win at least one. It could happen this week vs. the Jaguars at home or at Jacksonville in Week 17, and a win against the Panthers is not completely out of the question. The point is: a team that plays the Steelers to within three points isn’t the worst team in the history of the league. Even if the Colts are the last winless team in the NFL this season.

Sparano6. Jim Irsay will break Caldwell’s firing on Twitter: Irsay has to be my favorite NFL owner of all time, simply because he gets the power of social media. Sure, most of the time he’s tweeting obscure lyrics from Pink Floyd’s The Final Cut album or pretending to look for Brett Favre in Hattiesburg, Miss., but Caldwell also will be the first owner in history to break the news on his own Twitter account that he’s firing his coach. John Elway has been great on Twitter as well, but Elway also has a boss. That’s not a problem for Irsay.

5. Tony Sparano will last the season: I don’t know if Jim Caldwell will make it to the season’s end with the Colts, but I’m thinking Sparano will do exactly that. The team is still playing hard -- and how about the Dolphins beating the crap out of the Chiefs in Kansas City last week? -- and though the talent is lacking in that organization (how much can be blamed on the departed Bill Parcells?), they still believe in Sparano. If the Dolphins can pull of another couple wins, hopefully owner Stephen Ross will let him last through the season. After the emasculation Ross put him through in the offseason, Sparano deserves that much at least.

4. HGH testing won’t be around in 2011: We told you about a month ago that the NFL’s HGH testing was a go and that it very well could start within that week. That was quickly disputed by the NFLPA -- which claims that nobody has explained to the union exactly how the tests will be conducted -- and here we are, nearly a month later, and nothing has happened. As NFLPA spokesman George Atallah told CBSSports.com’s Mike Freeman, “We have an agreement to test for HGH. What we don't have an agreement on is the process and the protocol to implement the test.” Considering the glacial pace at which the two sides moved when the 2011 season was at stake, I don’t expect the league to start testing until next season. If then.

3. Carson Palmer will be better than average: That’s not exactly a high bar to jump over, but considering he wasn’t even that in his final seasons for the Bengals, this would be an improvement. Palmer had a rough outing in his first action, replacing Kyle Boller in the second half of the Chiefs game, but he showed some of the Palmer of old, throwing three touchdowns (and three more interceptions) in the loss to the Broncos. Will Palmer be worth the two high-round draft picks the Raiders gave to the Bengals for him? Probably not, but Palmer will keep the Raiders in the playoff hunt.

2. Wade Phillips will save Gary Kubiak’s job: The Texans defensive coordinator is well on his way to doing exactly that for Houston’s head coach. Because, at this very moment, the Texans defense is ranked No. 1 in the NFL. You remember what they were last year, right? No. 30. Hiring Phillips might be the best move Kubiak ever made, and Phillips is repaying him by recreating a defense that will lead Houston to the playoffs and keep Kubiak safely employed.

1. Packers will win Super Bowl: I mean, who else is there?

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Posted on: October 13, 2011 11:17 am
 

Top Ten with a Twist: Living Legends

Bum Phillips is a living legend (Getty).

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

With the death last Saturday of Raiders owner Al Davis, we got to see a side of him that most people under 35 never got to experience. When Davis was an innovator, a kick-ass coach and owner, a fighter against The Man and one of the most important figures in NFL history. It was nice to be reminded of that with tributes all over the Internet, newspapers and in NFL stadiums on Sunday.

Maybe we didn’t think about it in terms like this, but Davis, though largely reclusive to the public, was a living legend, and in the final years of his life, we probably didn’t appreciate him as much as we should have.

That said, here are 10 other living legends who hold (or who should hold)  a special place in the league’s heart. No matter what they’ve become today -- those who are outspoken for and against their old teams, those who spend their time behind the scenes, and those who have disappeared for now -- it’s not too late to show them our appreciation for all the good they’ve done and the lives they’ve led.

10. Ron Wolf: Another of Davis’ protégés, Davis gave Wolf a job as a scout for the Raiders in the early 1960s, and after helping the Raiders to a plethora of wins, he helped set up a 1979 division title in Tampa Bay before moving on to Green Bay as the general manager. He hired Mike Holmgren as the head coach, traded for a backup quarterback named Brett Favre, revitalized that franchise that led to Super Bowl riches and restored the name of a storied organization that had fallen into disrepair.

9. Mike Westhoff: The only man on this list who’s still active in the game, you might remember Westhoff from his turn on Hard Knocks where he played the Jets awesome special teams coach. It wasn’t much of a stretch, because Westhoff has been an awesome special teams coach. Aside from that, he’s a bone cancer survivor (he had to have nearly a dozen surgeries to get rid of it), and he’s one of the most respected working coaches today. But he won’t be around much longer. After 30 years of coaching, he’s said this season will be his last.

Kramer8. Ray Guy: Last year, I made him my No. 1 former player who deserves be in the Hall of Fame, but since he probably won’t ever get to Canton, that list and this one will have to suffice. Once Shane Lechler’s career is over, he’ll be considered the No. 1 punter of all time (maybe he’ll have a chance at the HOF!), but Guy was the one who showed the NFL how important a punter could be to his team.

7. Jerry Kramer (seen at right): He was a better football player than Jim Bouton was a pitcher, but both opened up the world of sports that fans had never seen before. Bouton’s tome, “Ball Four,” is a masterpiece that shocked those who had watched baseball and thought of players like Mickey Mantle as pure of heart. Kramer’s 1968 book, "Instant Replay," was a diary he kept of the 1967 season in which he gave glimpses of what life was like inside the Packers locker room under coach Vince Lombardi while chronicling some of the most famous moments in Green Bay history.

6. James “Shack” Harris: He was the first black player in the NFL to start at quarterback for the entire season in 1969, and in 1975, he led the Los Angeles Rams to an 11-2 record and an NFC West division title. He wasn’t a dominant quarterback in his day, but he was a trailblazer. And after retirement from playing, he was the head of pro player personnel when the Ravens won the Super Bowl in 2001. He’s currently a personnel executive with the Lions.

5. Chuck Noll: We don’t see much of Noll -- who’s rumored to be in declining health -- these days, but his impact is unmistakable. He won four Super Bowls as head coach of the Steelers in the 1970s, and Al Davis thought so much of him that he once tried to sue him (the two were on the same staff in San Diego in the early 1960s). And he was the first coach to allow his team to take baseline concussion tests -- which, as we know today, was a pretty important development.

4. Joe Namath: The legendary Jets quarterback has become a thorn in coach Rex Ryan’s side. Namath is constantly on Twitter, exhorting or back-handing his former team, and because he’s Joe Freakin’ Namath, the media has to pay attention. With that -- and his on-air exchange a few years back with Suzy Kolber -- it’s not difficult to forget just how good Namath was as a signal-caller. He was the first to throw for 4,000 yards (in a 14-game season no less), and he boldly guaranteed victory for the underdog Jets in Super Bowl III and then went out and delivered.

3. Joe Gibbs: One of my colleagues recently called him the greatest coach of the last 40 years, and considering Gibbs won three Super Bowls with three different quarterbacks (Joe Theismann, Doug Williams and Mark Rypien), he’s one of the legends. His return to the Redskins from 2004-07 didn’t go so well (a combined 30-34 record), but before that, his complete career winning percentage was better than all coaches not named John Madden or Vince Lombardi.

2. John Madden: We don’t get to hear much from John Madden these days, and that’s too bad. I liked him on Monday Night Football -- his football knowledge and his enthusiasm -- and though he was before my time, you have to admire his coaching record. He took over the Raiders job in 1969 at the tender age of 33, and when he retired after the 1978 season, he had a coaching record of 103-32-7. That is a winning percentage of .763, and to go with it, he won a Super Bowl and seven division titles in 10 years.

1. Bum Phillips: The old Oilers coach -- and 3-4 defense innovator -- is still kicking around in Texas, attending Texans games, wearing his big cowboy hat and writing books about his life (OK, it’s one book, but you should check it out). He’s a fun guy to speak with, and he’s fully into philanthropy. But aside from his defensive prowess, the dude is a great storyteller. Quickly, one of my favorites: when he was an assistant coach to Sid Gillman, one of the earliest believers in breaking down film, Phillips barely could keep his eyes open one night as Gillman continued studying game tape. Suddenly, out of nowhere, Gillman excitedly claimed that watching film made him feel so awesome that it was better than having sex. Responded Phillips: "Either I don't know how to watch film, Sid, or you don't know how to make love."

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Posted on: October 8, 2011 4:06 pm
 

Favre 'surprised' by reaction to Rodgers comments

Posted by Will Brinson



Last week, retired Packers legend Brett Favre said he was surprised that it took current Packers legend Aaron Rodgers "so long" to win a Super Bowl, because of all the talent on Green Bay's roster.

This did not go over well -- current teammates of Rodgers' lept to his defense, and most of the media chastised Favre for refusing to fade quietly away from the spotlight.

Favre, for his part, now says he's "surprised" at the reaction that his comments caused.

"Nothing, for the most part, surprises me anymore," Favre told USA Today's Jon Saraceno. "But I have to admit [the reaction to] this one surprised me."

This is somewhat understandable, given that Favre did have lots of nice things to say about Rodgers and the as-currently-constructed Packers roster.

"It is very [infrequent] when I do interviews," Favre said. "I was very gracious and complimentary of the Packers and Aaron Rodgers."

Again, this is true. However, Favre left the door open for criticism with the way he phrased his words. Had he said, "I knew that Rodgers would win one sooner or later," we wouldn't be talking about this.

But Favre didn't do that. He used the phrase "fell into a good situation" to describe where Rodgers ended up, which is the very definition of a backhanded compliment, especially when, to paraphrase Packers wideout Greg Jennings, Favre couldn't win a Super Bowl with the same roster.
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Posted on: October 6, 2011 9:52 am
 

Jennings: 'We didn't go all the way with Brett'

Posted by Will Brinson



Brett Favre refuses to let it go, doesn't he? The ol' gunslinger recently appeared on an Atlanta radio station and said he was surprised it took Aaron Rodgers 'so long' to win a Super Bowl, given all the talent on the Packers.

This went over terribly; the only defense for Favre's comments were "misconstrued, maybe?" and "backhanded compliment." Neither of those are good excuses. Greg Jennings, who played with both Rodgers and Favre, has a better answer -- Favre just "won't give it all up" (read: admit Rodgers is better) to A-Rodge.

"When you first hear it, you're kind of like, 'What?' " Jennings said Wednesday on the NFL Network. "But knowing Brett, knowing the competitive guy he is, he's never going to really give it all up to Aaron. I don't think he should, because I don't think Aaron would give it up to him, trust me."

"We played with Brett, we had success with Brett, we didn't go all the way with Brett, but we did with Aaron, so I think that that kind of speaks for itself."

Boom -- Jennings just pulled off, as they say in France, "le burn" on Mr. Favre. And there's really no arguing about it -- Favre had a similar (albeit younger) team when he was last playing with the Packers and they didn't win the title.

Rodgers did, making this whole argument moot. It is understandable, though, that Favre wouldn't want to admit that Rodgers is the better Packers quarterback, mainly because it would tarnish his legacy more than ... well, OK, not more than some of the stuff he did, but it would still diminish his role in Green Bay's football success.

Rodgers, for his part, wouldn't take the bait, giving it all up to the team when asked about Favre's comments on Tuesday.

"You know what? Again, I'm just going to say I was really proud of our team," Rodgers told Jason Wilde on ESPN Milwaukee. "It takes 53 guys to win a championship. We had the right recipe last year, and we're trying to do that same thing this season."

And that right there is the main difference between a guy who's supposed to be mowing a farm on a tractor, and a guy who's in the middle of an undefeated season. Clay Matthews recently said that Favre's comments will likely motivate Rodgers, and I imagine he's correct.

But you won't hear Rodgers mention it until -- and probably only if -- he ends up holding the Lombardi Trophy again at the end of the season.

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Posted on: October 5, 2011 11:31 pm
Edited on: October 6, 2011 11:21 pm
 

Harrison calls Favre 'immature', 'classless'

One teammate thinks Aaron Rodgers will be motivated by Brett Favre's remarks. (Getty Images)

Posted by Ryan Wilson

Add another name to the list: Rodney Harrison, the former NFL player who now serves as a studio analyst for NBC's Football Night in America, is unimpressed with Brett Favre and his backhanded compliments. In case you missed it, Favre went on an Atlanta radio station to talk up Aaron Rodgers' successes since the ol' gunslinger left Green Bay after the 2008 season, but qualified his remarks by adding, "He just kind of fell into a good situation … [and] I’m really kind of surprised it took him so long" to win.

That went over about as well as a naughty text message.

A day later and folks are lining up to unload on Favre. Cue Harrison, who went on a two-minute tirade during an appearance on NBC SportsTalk.

"You know what, it's just so disappointing to see a guy retire, walk away from the game, and everything that he's accomplished in his career is now diminished," Harrison said.  "What point does it serve for him to come out and criticize a guy like Aaron Rodgers, who's been a complete gentleman, a complete professional, a guy that's had so much success? Why wouldn't you root this guy on?

"These are the type of guys we need in the National Football League. You hear so much negativity surrounding our players, why can't you cheer for a guy like that? It just shows how classless and immature this guy is."

Harrison was asked if the remarks change the perception about Favre.

"Let me tell you something: this little comment didn't change what everyone else had been thinking the last two or three years about Brett Favre," Harrison said. "They know what Brett Favre is about -- he's about himself. He's about nothing else but himself.  So I have a lot of respect for Aaron Rodgers and what he's accomplished. He's one of the top two or three quarterbacks in the National Football League, and he will continue to get better."

And what about the idea that Favre wasn't particularly interested in helping Rodgers after the Packers drafted him in 2005?

"Do you honestly believe … that Brett Favre was the type of guy that was going to help a young first-round stud coming in and taking his job?" Harrison asked rhetorically. "That's not in Brett Favre's nature. That's not in him to come out and help a guy like that. So does it surprise me? No it doesn't surprise me. Has the last three years of his career surprised me? No it hasn't surprised me. This is what Brett Favre is about. He's about Brett Favre and that's it."

Doesn't leave much room for interpretation.

PFT's Michael David Smith points us to Rodgers' teammate, linebacker Clay Matthews, who said Wednesday on Jim Rome Is Burning that while he doesn't want to make a big deal out of Favre's comments, he thinks it will motivate Rodgers nonetheless.

“I’m not going to get involved with that, but I know 12,” Matthews said, referencing Rodgers’ jersey number. “He hears those comments. It definitely fuels the fire. He’s playing outstanding ball but it’s only going to continue to exacerbate the situation and continue to step his game up, so I’m just looking forward to having him on my team and to see what he is able to do.”

Back in February, CBSSports.com's Mike Freeman wrote that Favre apparently wanted to reach out to Rodgers to settle their past differences, but was afraid he might come off looking bad.

“This is one of those situations where Brett can’t win,” the player, who didn’t want his name used, said. “If he calls Aaron it looks like he’s grandstanding. If he doesn’t, he seems like he’s selfish and inconsiderate. I can tell you Brett wants to speak to Aaron. He really does and it’s sincere. I don’t know if they’ve spoken yet. I just know Brett wants to bury the hatchet.”

The solution, clearly, was for Favre to take his message to the radio.

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Posted on: October 4, 2011 4:22 pm
Edited on: October 4, 2011 4:29 pm
 

Favre surprised it took Rodgers 'so long' to win

Brett Favre may be gone but he refuses to be forgotten. (Getty Images)

Posted by Ryan Wilson

Brett Favre may not have wanted to be a mentor to Aaron Rodgers after the Packers drafted him in 2005, but now that the ol' gunslinger's officially retired from the NFL, he's had a chance to reflect on his career. That includes his final years in Green Bay, when the organization tried to gently transition from Hall of Famer to up-and-comer … except that Favre was having none of it.

In the end, it all got very messy, with the fake-retirement press conferences, the one-year stint with the Jets that only made things worse, and the ultimate slap in the face to Green Bay: playing for the division rival Vikings. (Karma: leading Minnesota to the NFC Championship game … only to throw a back-breaking, game-deciding interception.)

But bygones are bygones, and the kindler, gentler Favre spoke about the high-powered Packers offense, and the finely tuned engine behind it all, Aaron Rodgers (via SportsRadioInterviews.com):
I’m going to be honest, I was not surprised [about Rodgers' performance]. The biggest surprise to me would be that he didn’t do it sooner. It’s funny how people can get over time -- my last year in Green Bay prior to the first game -- I made the remark that this was probably the most talented team that I’ve ever played on. And of course everyone looked up and was like ‘this guy’s off his rocker.’

We were very, very young; take me out of the mix and we were by far the youngest team in the league. But I could see the talent pool across the board was outstanding. Now our season kind of ended up being a reflection of that. We came close, and I think we took a lot of people by surprise, but guys emerged rather quickly.

Aaron had a chance…even though the last couple years it’s seemed like he’s almost a rookie, he’s been around awhile. And I’d like to think that he watched, he learned, and then when he got a chance to play, he brought in his ability which is obviously very good or they wouldn’t have drafted him in the first round. He’s got tremendous talent, he’s very bright and he got a chance to watch and see successful teams do it right.

And so he just kind of fell into a good situation. On top of that, he’s a good player. I don’t think there’s any pressure on him now, the talent around him is even better than when I was there. So I’m really kind of surprised it took him so long. In the early part of last year season, it hadn’t quite clicked yet and I didn’t know it would. I just kind of figured when they hit their stride, they’re going to be hard to beat. And that’s what happened.
The Cliffs Notes version of Favre's longwinded remarks: "Aaron Rodgers is obviously good, but he's also the beneficiary of watching me play so awesomely for so long. Plus, the team he has now is WAY better than anything I had to work with. So, yeah, he doesn't have any pressure on him."

CBSSports.com's Mike Freeman is understandably apoplectic. "[Favre] can't leave it alone. Can't just wear his Wranglers. Can't go fishin' or do his textin'. Has to chime in knowing it's probably going to irk Rodgers. Unbelievable."

The thing is, we bet Rodgers won't even acknowledge it. Guys who can rock the ironic hillbilly look (the only way to make this better would be if Rodgers wore Wranglers over his game pants) while rightfully clowning another NFL quarterback are clearly quite comfortable with their station in life.

Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers takes his facial hair very seriously. (Getty Images)

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com