Tag:Deion Sanders
Posted on: February 5, 2011 9:15 pm
 

2011 NFL Hall of Fame class: Who got snubbed?

Posted by Will Brinson

Invariably, whenever there's a group of people inducted into a professional sports league's Hall of Fame, there's a group of people who got snubbed. And that's the case with the 2011 NFL Hall of Fame class.

That's not to take away from the group of men that got inducted: Deion Sanders, Marshall Faulk, Shannon Sharpe, Ed Sabol, Chris Hanburger and Les Richer comprise a pretty tremendous class.

But there are still some pretty big names who didn't make the cut and probably deserved better. (Quickly: the good news is that next year's Hall class is substantially less qualified than this year, making things easier on nominees.)



[More Super Bowl coverage]

Curtis Martin, RB, NE/NYJ: Martin fell victim to the the positional abundance that Andy mentioned earlier -- he, Jerome Bettis and Marshall Faulk comprise a ridiculous group of running backs for one Hall class, particularly when it comes to first-time nominees.

Martin's the fourth all-time leading rusher in NFL history, ranks 12th in rushing touchdowns, third in total touches, 11th in all-purpose yards, eighth in yards from scrimmage, 19th in total touchdowns, third in rushing attempts, 11th in rushing yards per game, went to five Pro Bowls, was an All-Pro in 2004 and by all accounts is a hell of a nice guy. Maybe even too nice -- it's often believed that Martin's quiet personality cost him some fame as well as cache with non-regional voters. The good news is that he made the cut to the final 10 this year, and appears to be receiving a surprisingly strong groundswell of support from voters.

Willie Roaf, OT, NO/KC: Roaf might have been the biggest snub of the entire year, if only because he didn't make the cut from 15 to 10. It's not like he was an 11-time Pro Bowler, a six-time first-team All Pro, a three-time second-time All Pro and a member of BOTH the 1990's All-Decade Team and the 2000's All-Decade Team or anything. Oh, and that was in only 13 years, so there's that. Look, it's tough to make a cut from 15 to 10 (and even tougher from 10 to five, of course), and it's really difficult to gauge an offensive lineman's value, especially in this class. But it's just kind of tough to find a reason why Roaf wouldn't make it further.

Cris Carter, WR, MIN: You could probably make a case for including all of Carter, Tim Brown and Andre Reed here. They were all dominant receivers, but that turned out to be problematic, because the three candidates split the vote amongst themselves according to numerous voters.

Carter's rankings are pretty solid though: he ranks fourth in NFL history in receiving touchdowns, third in receptions, eighth in receiving yards, he made eight Pro Bowls and and was a two-time All Pro. But so are Reed's (he ranks 10th in total receptions, 11th in receiving yards and 12th in receiving TDs) and Brown's (fourth in receptions, sixth in receiving TDs, fourth in receiving yards, fifth in punt return yards and fourth in punt return yards). Setting a standard by which we can measure Hall of Fame receivers is only becoming tougher as the NFL becomes more and more tilted towards a passing league. The lack of Hall votes for these guys emphasizes that.

Jerome Bettis, RB, PIT: The Bus also falls into the positional disparity problem, because, well his stats don't lie: fifth all-time in touches, fourth all-time in rushing attempts, fifth all-time in rushing yards, 10th all-time in rushing yards, six Pro Bowls, two All Pro teams and a Super Bowl in his hometown. (Which counts for something, I think.)

But Bettis didn't even make it to the final cut, and that's a shame. Even if he's going to "get in at some point" or if he's "part of a tough RB class," he and Martin are pretty clearly two of the all-time greats when it comes to running backs in NFL history.

They just happened to be entering the Hall of Fame with a guy who was more dominant in Faulk. And even though there's no crime in getting the current class of guys in now, it's still tough to fathom how some of the guys listed above piled up the numbers they did without the recognition.

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Posted on: February 5, 2011 7:32 pm
Edited on: February 5, 2011 7:48 pm
 

2011 NFL Hall of Fame induction class

Posted by Will Brinson

DALLAS -- The 2011 NFL Hall of Fame induction took place on Saturday night in downtown Dallas and Deion Sanders, Marshall Faulk, Shannon Sharpe, Ed Sabol, Les Richter, Chris Hanburger and Ed Sabol were selected as the seven members of this year's class.

Faulk, the versatile backfield threat for the Rams and Colts, and Sanders, an all-time great kick returns, cornerback and all-out athlete were the only first-time candidates for the Hall who were inducted.

Dent, the Bears all-time sack leader and MVP of Super Bowl XX, was the 27th player for Chicago to be enshrined, the most of any NFL team.

Sabol, the founder of NFL Films and one of the architects of the modern-day NFL image, was considered a controversial figure because of concerns with non-players. Apparently, the clear-cut popularity of the NFL -- amid the possibility of a labor lockout no less -- made up for any of those concerns.

Hanburger, a nine-time Pro Bowler for the Redskins, made the cut after his 28th year of eligibility. Oddly enough, "Hangman" made the cut in a season in which the NFL truly preached player safety, despite being known for some questionable "tackling techniques."

Richter was an eight-time Pro Bowler (consecutively, no less) for the Los Angeles Rams in the 1950's and 60's.

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Posted on: January 9, 2011 12:46 pm
 

NFL Hall of Fame 2011 class finalists announced

Posted by Will Brinson

Marshall Faulk, Jerome Bettis and Curtis Martin -- three of the great running backs in NFL history -- were all listed as part of the 17 finalists for the NFL Hall of Fame's 2011 class.

The Hall of Fame announced the list Sunday, via NFL.com, and it includes 15 modern-era players, two senior nominees and five first-timers on the list.

Bettis, Faulk, Martin, Deion Sanders and Willie Roaf were listed as first-time finalists on the Hall of Fame ballot for 2011. It seems unlikely that all three running backs will make it, and Faulk and/or Bettis seem likely to land a spot moreso than Martin, mainly because of team success and off-field behavior.

Tim Brown, Cris Carter, Dermontti Dawson, Richard Dent, Charles Haley, Cortez Kennedy, Andre Reed and Shannon Sharpe made the ballot as nominees who had been listed before.

Chris Hanburger and Les Richter were listed as the senior nominees on the Hall's ballot.

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Posted on: December 1, 2010 12:19 am
 

Top Ten With a Twist: Not yet HOFers

Fireworks fly during the 2010 Pro Football HOF induction ceremony (US Presswire).

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

The Pro Football Hall of Fame this past Sunday released the names of the 26 semifinalists that could be inducted into the HOF for 2011. Most of the names you know. You’ve watched them play. You’ve watched them win. You’ve watched them etch out fantastic careers.

Last year, you knew guys like Jerry Rice and Emmitt Smith were going to make their way into the HOF in their first years of eligibility. These players were some of the best of all time. It was no contest.

But each year, there are certain players or coaches or executives that are left out who deserve to enter the hallowed halls of the … well … Hall. This Top Ten With a Twist isn’t about the players you know who full well will be inducted into next year’s induction class, minus Prime Time. These are the guys who might not, but who probably should be.

10. George Young, executive: I wonder if Young’s enshrinement has been held off because his skills had declined noticeably late in his career (ie. when free agency was introduced to the game in the early 1990s). But there’s no denying that Young was the NFL executive of the year five times and the teams he worked for won three conference titles and one Super Bowl title. For an executive, he was pretty damn important.

9. Jerry Kramer, OG, Packers (1958-68): While he was a very good player in his day – as the three Pro Bowls, five All-Pro selections and the oodles of championships attest – he did the world a favor when he wrote Instant Replay in 1967, giving fans an inside look at what occurs during an NFL season and at coach Vince Lombardi. No, it’s no Ball Four by Jim Bouton (that guy never could get in baseball’s HOF, by the way), but Kramer’s impact on how the fans view the game is an important piece of the NFL’s history.

8. Steve Tasker, WR/ST, Oilers (1985-86), Bills (1986-97): During his 14-year career, Tasker started a total of 15 games. He never had more than 21 catches in a season, and he caught nine touchdown passes. But the fact he’s perhaps the best special teams player ever to compete in the NFL should give him a path to the HOF. He was a 5-foot-9, 180-pound gunner, and he was fast and lethal. He went to the Pro Bowl seven times, and he was named the MVP of the Pro Bowl in 1993. He didn’t make it to the semifinals this year, but that’s not surprising. Special teamers are not given their just due (see No. 1).

7. Andre Reed, WR, Bills (1985-99), Redskins (2000): Reed has gotten caught up in the WR numbers game. He’s been eligible at the same time as Michael Irvin, Jerry Rice, Tim Brown, Art Monk and Cris Carter, and I can see why it’d be tough to select Reed instead of those kinds of receivers. But you have to remember that Reed ranks ninth in career receptions all time and 11th in receiving yards. At some point, he deserves to be enshrined in Canton. Don’t expect it to happen this year, though.

6. Dermontti Dawson, C, Steelers (1988-2000): Simply put, he’s one of the greatest centers of all time. He made the Pro Bowl seven-straight seasons, and with his athletic ability and his knack for getting out in open space and making key blocks for his running backs, he changed the perception of what a center should be. He’ll probably become a finalist for the second time in as many years. One of these days, he should get the welcoming phone call.

5. Cris Carter, WR, Eagles (1987-89), Vikings (1990-2001), Dolphins (2002): Much like Reed, Carter is overshadowed by other receivers. He finished his career as the No. 2 WR (behind Jerry Rice) in receptions and touchdowns. He’s been passed by Marvin Harrison on the receptions list and by Randy Moss and Terrell Owens on the touchdowns list since he retired, but at some point, Carter should be in. It’s actually a little surprising that he’s not in already.

4. Don Coryell, coach: Yes, he wasn’t the originator of today’s modern offense – that’d be a combination of Sid Gillman, Paul Brown and various others – but his Air Coryell teams in the late 1970s to mid 1980s with the Chargers helped innovate the passing game we still see today. He’s already a member of the College Football Hall of Fame. Now, it’s time for him to join Gillman as the only two coaches to be enshrined in the college and the pro Halls of Fame.

3. Deion Sanders, CB/PR, Falcons (1989-93), 49ers (1994), Cowboys (1995-99), Redskins (2000), Ravens (2004-05) : The reasons why are obvious. Just look at the video below. This is his first year eligible, and there’s little chance he won’t make it in immediately.



2. Ed Sabol, contributor: Enjoy watching NFL Films productions? You like watching the behind-the-scenes spots of the players woofing at each other on the sidelines and your favorite coach’s pregame and postgame speeches? If yes, you can thank Sabol, who helped found NFL Films in the mid-1960s. How differently would we view – and think about – the NFL if Sabol hadn’t been such a visionay? That’s unanswerable of course, but the fact NFL Films plays a big role in an NFL’s viewing experience makes Sabol HOF worthy.

1. Ray Guy, P, Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders (1973-86): Simply put, Guy is the greatest punter in the history of the game. But there are no kickers enshrined in the HOF. That must mean they’re less important than anybody else, right? Well, we all know that’s not true. It’s time to get Guy into the Hall. He deserves it.

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Posted on: November 28, 2010 12:54 pm
 

Pro Football HOF semifinalists released

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Here’s the list of the 26 official Hall of Fame semifinalists.

Jerome Bettis, RB – 1993-95 Los Angeles/St. Louis Rams, 1996-2005 Pittsburgh Steelers

Tim Brown, WR/KR – 1988-2003 Los Angeles/Oakland Raiders, 2004 Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Cris Carter, WR – 1987-89 Philadelphia Eagles, 1990-2001 Minnesota Vikings, 2002 Miami Dolphins

Don Coryell, Coach – 1973-77 St. Louis Cardinals, 1978-1986 San Diego Chargers

Roger Craig, RB – 1983-1990 San Francisco 49ers, 1991 Los Angeles Raiders, 1992-93 Minnesota Vikings

Terrell Davis, RB – 1995-2001 Denver Broncos Dermontti Dawson, C – 1988-2000 Pittsburgh Steelers

Edward DeBartolo, Jr., Owner – 1979-1997 San Francisco 49ers

Richard Dent, DE – 1983-1993, 1995 Chicago Bears, 1994 San Francisco 49ers, 1996 Indianapolis Colts, 1997 Philadelphia Eagles

Chris Doleman, DE/LB – 1985-1993, 1999 Minnesota Vikings, 1994-95 Atlanta Falcons, 1996-98 San Francisco 49ers

Marshall Faulk, RB – 1994-98 Indianapolis Colts, 1999-2005 St. Louis Rams

Kevin Greene, LB/DE – 1985-1992 Los Angeles Rams, 1993-95 Pittsburgh Steelers, 1996, 1998-99 Carolina Panthers, 1997 San Francisco 49ers

Ray Guy, P – 1973-1986 Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders

Charles Haley, DE/LB – 1986-1991, 1999 San Francisco 49ers, 1992-96 Dallas Cowboys Lester Hayes, CB – 1977-1986 Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders

Cortez Kennedy, DT – 1990-2000 Seattle Seahawks

Curtis Martin, RB – 1995-97 New England Patriots, 1998-2005 New York Jets Art Modell, Owner – 1961-1995 Cleveland Browns, 1996-2003 Baltimore Ravens

Andre Reed, WR – 1985-1999 Buffalo Bills, 2000 Washington Redskins

Willie Roaf, T – 1993-2001 New Orleans Saints, 2002-05 Kansas City Chiefs

Ed Sabol, Contributor – 1964-1995 NFL Films

Deion Sanders, CB/KR/PR – 1989-1993 Atlanta Falcons, 1994 San Francisco 49ers, 1995-99 Dallas Cowboys, 2000 Washington Redskins, 2004-05 Baltimore Ravens

Shannon Sharpe, TE – 1990-99, 2002-03 Denver Broncos, 2000-01 Baltimore Ravens

Paul Tagliabue, Commissioner – 1989-2006 National Football League

Aeneas Williams, CB/S – 1991-2000 Phoenix/Arizona Cardinals, 2001-04 St. Louis Rams

George Young, Contributor – 1968-1974 Baltimore Colts, 1975-78 Miami Dolphins, 1979-1997 New York Giants, 1998-2001 National Football League

A couple notes:

- The five first-year eligible players are Bettis, Faulk, Martin, Roaf and Sanders.

- This is the first time DeBartolo and Sabol have made it to the semifinals.

- Usually, there are 25 semifinalists, but there was a tie for the final spot. So, 26 it is.

- The list will be whittled to 15 finalists and will be announced next January.

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Posted on: November 24, 2010 1:30 pm
 

Samuel fined $40K, calls Deion 'a hater'

Posted by Will Brinson

Today was a pretty good day to be around Asante Samuel; at least if you're a member of the media anyway -- Samuel kicked the day off by calling Deion Sanders "a hater."

Then he proceeded to get tattooed with a $40,000 fine for his helmet-to-helmet hit on Giants wideout Derek Hagan Sunday night.

Samuel's hit was notable because after doing exactly what the NFL wants him not to do (leading with his head), he proceeded to do exactly why the NFL hates leading with the head (celebrating) and seemed all but guaranteed to get fined.

According to Jeff McLane of the Philadelphia Inquirer, Samuel was originally fined $50,000, but Eagles coach Andy Reid was able to (somehow) convince the league to lower the fine by $10,000.

Eagles offensive lineman Todd Herremans was also fined $5,000 for penalties he received after blocking attempts on Chris Canty, who believed that Herremans was going at his knees.

As for the Deion thing, well, he recently called Samuel "the best off corner in the game" which actually seems fairly complimentary, unless it's backhanded. Samuel tweeted that Deion is "the biggest hater in the world" and that "he ain't no [Florida] boy he is a fake."

Unfortunately for Asante, Deion now gets to spend some time on the NFL Network discussing the Eagles cornerback's most recent fine, and that means plenty of time to "analyze" his off-field actions too.

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Posted on: November 23, 2010 8:58 am
 

Hot Routes 11.23.10: Wade Phillips is Tom Landry?

Posted by Will Brinson



Got a link for the Hot Routes? Hit us up on Twitter (@CBSSportsNFL).
  • Wade Phillips is probably a bitter dude right now -- not only did his team totally give up on him, but the guy (Jason Garrett) that Jerry Jones hired to help Wade seemingly feigned offensive incompetence for the entire time Wade was in charge, only to "discover" his genius after taking over the team. Anyway, Wade's not going out like that, yo. He said he'd take a defensive coordinator position in the future and also pointed out that he "went out with the same winning percentage as Tom Landry." 
Posted on: November 19, 2010 12:58 pm
Edited on: November 19, 2010 1:34 pm
 

Deion Sanders talks Vick, McNabb, NFL Top 100

Posted by Will Brinson

CBSSports.com: I picked the Falcons to win the Super Bowl before the year -- do you think they can make a case for being the dominant team in the NFL?

Deion Sanders: I don't know about dominant. I think the win over Baltimore a week ago did a lot for their confidence and did a lot for them getting tot he next level physically and emotionally and psychologically. I don't know about dominant because the back end of their defense is not dominant -- you've got [John] Abraham who's one of the best pass rushers in the game, but when you think about dominant you think about a dominant defense.

CBS: Alright, how about Michael Vick then?

DS: Unbelievable. Can you win MVP and Comeback Player of the Year? Because right now, I think he's the frontrunner for both.

CBS: Yeah, and it's crazy because so many people passed on him for PR reasons and then so many people wanted him to be something like a wide receiver or running back …

DS: Well that was ignorant -- ignorant folks who probably have never played the game really wanted to be the first to make a stupid statement like that. How could a guy that's gone to the Pro Bowl, you say he's going to have to change his whole position? That's like saying a guy who has a knee injury and then come back and subsequently next year have another injury should change position. That's crazy -- just sitting out two years of incarceration, he's still a quarterback. Not only that, he led his team to the NFC Championship before and made a few Pro Bowls so to change positions, that's just crazy.

CBS: How much of his success -- and it's unbelievable to see how he's developed as a pocket passer -- do you put on the situation that he landed in, with Andy Reid and the Eagles?

DS: You put that on the team -- you put that on the team he plays with. How can you stay in the pocket with the Falcons when they're one of the worst offensive lines in the game? So being in the pocket where you've got not only two receivers [DeSean Jackson and Jeremy Maclin] but maybe three receivers, because [Brent] Celek is a great alternative and one of the better tight ends in the league. Having someone to throw to in a real scheme and having confidence in his abilities, I think that attributes to his success right now. And having a year to really sit back … and I think if you asked him to pinpoint some things, I think he would tell you what a vital role Donovan McNabb played in his life. The preparation, getting ready mentally, physically and psychologically during the week as well -- I think that's the first time he saw a professional act as a professional at the quarterback position that he can identify with.

CBS: Speaking of McNabb, the details of his contract changed and it looks more favorable for Washington -- do you think he's making a mistake by leaving himself open to getting locked in with Mike Shanahan again next year?

DS: No, I don't think he's making a mistake. One thing about athletes -- you want sure money. And I think that's what he did. I think both situations lend itself to one another, because if he goes to another team, he'll still get his guaranteed money, and [the Redskins] took care of themselves at the same token. So I think both parties win.

CBS: The NFL Network recently did the Top 100 players of all-time, and for those of us who grew up cheering for the Braves and the Falcons, your ranking seemed a little auspicious -- do you think a versatile guy like yourself got kind of hosed there?

DS: The thing about it is that some people who voted in that selection process, they let personal feelings get in the way of reality. And that should never come into play. You should never let the way you feel personally about a person get into what's real about a person and what's genuine about a person as well.

CBS: On that same note, personal feelings seem to factor into the Hall of Fame discussion too -- a guy like Terrell Owens comes to mind immediately because---

DS: How can he not be in the Top 100 players? That's just crazy.

CBS: So you think it's crazy if he doesn't get serious Hall of Fame consideration?

DS: Well, he wasn't in the Top 100, so lets you know right there how they feel about him and you can't go by personal stuff, you've got to go by what they did on the field.

CBS: Alright, is this the craziest NFL season you've ever seen, between the parity and all the different storylines?

DS: No, not really. There's a lot of parity -- it's not really crazy, there's a lot of parity. And that's what you want -- you want every team to have the ability to win the Super Bowl. And it goes back to what we were saying, there's no dominance right now, like the Cowboys did in the 90's, like the Patriots did, even Pittsburgh, who won two Super Bowls out of the last few, there's no dominance right now.

CBS: Speaking of dominating, I would assume if you're working out with every day people, which I believe you're doing with EA, I would assuming you're dominating some people there?

DS: [Laughing] Yeah, I'm having a good time with the EA Sports Training Camp and it's wonderful. Not only are we getting kids off the couch, but we're getting adults off the couch and allowing them to participate and compete as well. There are over 70 drills and eight challenges in this game -- it's designed to increase your strength, power, balance and agility just to name a few areas of concern for people. It gives you a total body workout and it monitors your heart as well and I'm really happy to be one of the guys behind the scenes who helped develop this thing.

CBS: Alright, good stuff, Deion, thanks for talking to us and take it easy.

DS: Alright man, have a good one.
 
 
 
 
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