Tag:Mike Brown
Posted on: September 1, 2011 7:02 pm
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Report: Carson Palmer, Bengals met in late July

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

After Andy Dalton had a terrible first preseason game for the Bengals -- you might remember that Bengals offensive coordinator Jay Gruden had a great back-handed compliment, saying “it wasn’t a total debacle” -- you had to wonder if the Bengals would put in a call to Carson Palmer.

The Carson Palmer Saga
But then Dalton redeemed himself a bit by playing better in a subsequent exhibition, and though it’s still clear that the Bengals offense will probably struggle this year, Bengals fans went back to hating Palmer for leaving the team.

But apparently the Bengals HAVE been talking to Palmer, as ESPN’s Bob Holtzman, via Rotoworld, reports Palmer traveled to Cincinnati in late July to talk with the team about possibly returning.

It’s interesting news considering owner Mike Brown said this in July: "I'm not expecting him to be back. Carson signed a contract, he made a commitment. He gave us his word. We relied on his word and his commitment. We expected him to perform here. If he is going to walk away from his commitment we aren’t going to reward him for doing it."

I still don’t think we’ll see Palmer on the field with the Bengals, but it’s fascinating that the possibility still exists. Or did as late as July.

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Posted on: August 17, 2011 4:24 pm
 

Roundtable: Which rookie QB will help the most?

C. Newton could be one of the breakout rookie QBs this year (Getty).

Posted by Eye on Football staff

Well, we're a week into the preseason and that means we know everything about everyone. Or nothing at all. Whatever, we got our first glimpses of the NFL's newest rookie quarterbacks and that leads us to the question: What rookie quarterback will help his team the most?

Will Brinson: Go ahead and cue up about 15 "Panthers homer" comments in the next few paragraphs, but I don't care: Cam Newton. The guy's a freak-a-deak athlete with a firehose attached to his right shoulder and he's going to get a chance to produce. Unfortunately, that firehose thing can also be bad if Newton can't control his accuracy. And it's possible that Jimmy Clausen -- who looked better than terrible after he threw a pick six on his second passing attempt -- could be the safer option for Carolina. But Newton gets the fanbase amped and he's already shown exponential growth since we last saw him throwing passes. Putting him in the proverbial fire's the way to go and he'll be a difference maker for Carolina in both the stands and the field.

Josh Katzowitz: Will, I couldn't agree with you more. I don't know if Newton will help his team that much more on the field than Clausen would have -- I'm willing to bet heavily on the odds that there are going to be games when Newton is ABSOLUTELY terrible and people are going to be saying, "Yeah, buddy, the NFL is a little different than the limited offense you ran at Auburn, eh?" (these people, of course, will be Canadians who care way too much about SEC football) -- but as far as starpower is concerned, Newton is the one. I don't care if he privately looks at himself as an entertainer and an icon. He's got that huge smile and he's got that charisma, and eventually, the stink of whatever NCAA rules his dad might have violated will wash away.

That said, I don't think he's going to contend for any rookie of the year honors, because as the season goes along, defenses are going to begin to figure out Newton. Actually, I think the real answer to your question about which rookie will help his team the most will end up being Colin Kaepernick in San Francisco, assuming he stays healthy behind that poor offensive line. Alex Smith will continue to be Alex Smith, and midway through the season, Jim Harbaugh will call upon Kaepernick to replace Smith and win a few games for the 49ers. And I think he'll do it, especially in the NFC West, hastening Smith's departure (which, when you think about it, might be the single biggest reason how Kaepernick impacts the team). Newton will help his franchise the most, but Kaepernick will help his team the most.

Ryan Wilson
: We talked about it (at length, I might add) and Newton was impressive. I know, it's just one preseason game, but the guy's come a long way since February, the Auburn scandal, and the silly comments about being an entertainer and an icon.

And let's be honest, he's energized fans that had every reason to lose all hope and commit their energies to supporting NASCAR full time. That can't be understated. Winning is obviously the goal, but Panthers fans will find reasons for optimism if the Panthers can win five or six games. So in terms of therapeutic value for a downtrodden fan base, Newton is this season's most valuable QB.

A. Dalton could be the starting QB in Cincinnati (Getty). But if we're talking about a QB who has a chance to play and help his team win enough games to battle for a playoff spot, I'm going with Christian Ponder. Partly because Myron Rolle thinks he's a genius, but also because Donovan McNabb has become a punchline in recent years. How long until he's yanked in favor of Ponder? Four weeks? Remember: this is the guy who not only lost his job to Rex Grossman last season, he was eventually demoted to third string behind John Beck, he of four career starts, all losses, all coming in 2007.

Brinson: Well, we're one full turn around the table and the only person we haven't talked about is the only guy who's virtually guaranteed to start Week 1: Andy Dalton.

So, um, yeaaaaaaah.

What does that say about the Bengals? (And why do I have the feeling Josh will try to defend them?) I guess it says either that "We don't respect Andy Dalton," "We forgot about Andy Dalton," or "Even if Andy Dalton was Peyton Manning, he wouldn't be saving the Bengals from certain doom in 2011."

Perhaps it's all three?

Wilson: I didn't mention Andy Dalton for the same reason I don't think about paying my mortgage every day: if I ignore it, it don't exist. It's a coping mechanism. In Dalton's case, it means I'm not constantly reminded of what the 2011 season inevitably holds for him: pain, misery, disappointment -- all words that have become synonymous with the Bengals in recent years.

(Just look what the madness did to even-keeled Carson Palmer -- it drove him right into retirement in what should be the prime of his career. Think about that for a minute. Things were so god-awful in Cincinnati that Palmer would rather sit around the house doing crosswords than get caught up in tiger-striped maelstrom for another season.)

While we shouldn't put too much stock in first-ever preseason performances, Dalton's got his introduction to big-boy football from, fittingly, Ndamukong Suh. And I feel that was just a preview of things to come in 2011 (for both Dalton and Suh). So, yeah, it's pretty easy to be down on Dalton, more because he's a victim of circumstance. Which is why I don't want to think about it.

Brinson: Thanks for the reminder on the mortgage payment, jerk. Speaking of which, if there's one thing that the Panthers, 49ers, Titans, Vikings, Jaguars and Bengals have in common it's that they mortgaged their future on the talents of the 2011 NFL Draft class. With that in mind, let's wrap up this puppy up by making a list -- how do you gents rank the rookies in terms of impact on the 2011 season? Here's mine. Don't copy it.

1. Cam Newton
2. Blaine Gabbert
3. Andy Dalton
4. Christian Ponder
5. Jake Locker
6. Colin Kaepernick
7. Ryan Mallet
8. Terrelle Pryor

PonderWilson: No matter the list -- or the topic -- one thing is assured: Brinson will put Cam Newton at the top of it. Panthers fan solidarity and whatnot.

Back on Earth...

1. Christian Ponder (He'll be starting before the end of Sept.)
2. Colin Kaepernick (See above)
3. Blaine Gabbert (He'll be starting before Halloween)
4. Cam Newton (The next Jimmy Clausen? JOKE. Clearly, he's the next Chris Weinke.)
5. Andy Dalton (Must've been a serial killer in a previous life to get stuck with this fate.)
6. Jake Locker (Should only play if Hasselbeck gets injured.)
7. Ryan Mallett (Bill Belichick is a genius. That is all.)
8. Terrelle Pryor (But he's a first-round pick!)

Katzowitz: Just in case, Will needs a reminder: Here's my takedown of Mike Brown and Marvin Lewis in that ridiculous news conference they called to announce that Lewis would return for another season, and here's what I wrote about the Bengals' lack of a practice bubble. I lived in Cincinnati for six years, but believe me when I say that I think the Bengals are an incompetent mess (though, personally, I think Mike Brown is a nice man).

My list (the correct one):

1. Colin Kaepernick (If Mike Singletary thought about replacing Alex Smith with David Carr (!) last season, Jim Harbaugh shouldn't have a problem replacing Smith with Kaepernick)
2. Christian Ponder (Because he's better than Rex Grossman, and since Grossman is better than Donovan McNabb ...)
3. Cam Newton (How disturbing would it be if Clausen actually won the starting job?)
4. Andy Dalton (He still has Cedric Benson to lean on)
5. Blaine Gabbert (I'm not sure he can beat out David Garrard, and I'm not sure Garrard will be bad enough this year to warrant starting Gabbert)
6. Jake Locker (Locker will get tons of help from Hasselbeck)
7. Ryan Mallett (He won't even beat out Brian Hoyer to be Brady's backup)
8. Terrelle Pryor (I don't know, maybe, he could be an effective NFL TE?)

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Posted on: August 4, 2011 5:09 pm
 

Niners email every NFL team to trade Taylor Mays

Posted by Will Brinson

When you try to trade a player in the NFL, you carefully seek out potential general managers who might have interest and inquire discreetly about whether they'd like to chat. (I assume that's what happens anyway.) What you don't do is email every team in the league and let them know someone's on the trading block.

But that's what the 49ers reportedly did on Thursday as, according to Adam Schefter of ESPN, they sent out "a mass email this afternoon to teams around the league to try and trade safety Taylor Mays."

Mays, as you'll likely recall, played at USC and seemed like a prime prospect for the Seahawks, since coach Pete Carroll recruited him out of high school. But Carroll passed on him and the Niners picked him up in the second round (49th overall).

That in and of itself should make put long-term ability to succeed in question. But what about this?

The 49ers single-handedly managed to prove to everyone in the NFL that they don't want Mays and simultaneously sink his market value. If it's true, it's a pretty bad move.

After all, this isn't like using the trading block option in your fantasy league. This is the NFL. And real life and stuff.

But what I want to know is -- did they use BCC? Or did they just CC everyone?

Because not only is CC awkward in that each person knows that you sent the email to everyone, but then you also have to deal with Mike Brown hitting "Reply All" for the next month and a half every time he tries to get in touch with you.

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Posted on: July 26, 2011 1:15 pm
Edited on: July 26, 2011 2:39 pm
 

Brown on Carson Palmer: 'He has retired'

Posted by Will Brinson



Two of the biggest offseason storylines this year -- the actual lockout notwithstanding -- were the respective sagas of Carson Palmer and Kevin Kolb, both quarterbacks under team control through 2011.

Kolb appears to be moving on via trade (though as Clark Judge noted, it's not "imminent") and it sure does look like Palmer's gone too -- Bengals owner Mike Brown reiterated on Tuesday that he is absolutely not going to bother trying to get anything of value of Palmer and will instead let him ride off into a youthful millionaire's sunset.

"I honesty like Carson Palmer. He was a splendid player for us," Brown said, via Joe Reedy of the Cincinnati Enquirer. "He is a good person. I wish him well and he has retired. That is his choice."
End of the Line for Palmer?

Yes. Yes it technically is Palmer's choice. And there's an argument to be made that Palmer is shirking his commitment. Mike Brown is making that argument.

"I'm not expecting him to be back. Carson signed a contract, he made a commitment," Brown continued. "He gave us his word. We relied on his word and his commitment. We expected him to perform here. If he is going to walk away from his commitment we aren’t going to reward him for doing it."

That is a very firm stance to take in this situation.

Unfortunately, it doesn't really qualify as "impressively strong" or "morally inflexible."

Instead, it's probably closer to "stupidly stubborn." If the Bengals traded Palmer -- and they absolutely could trade Palmer and get good value for him at this stage of things -- would the Bengals be harmed in any particular way?

No, no they would not, because they would acquire something in return for Palmer that would benefit the organization -- and the fans! -- over the long term.

Instead, they're going to let Palmer just walk away because he's sick of playing for the organization that treats its employees -- and its fans! -- in this way despite having just gotten through the longest work stoppage in history?

Yes, that's a much smarter move than trying to build for the future.

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Posted on: July 18, 2011 10:30 am
Edited on: July 18, 2011 2:07 pm
 

Bengals lead league in arrests, no-comment Benson

Posted by Will Brinson

Over the weekend, Cedric Benson was arrested in Austin for assault. The collective response from most folks was: "Again?"

That's a problem. And so is the fact that Benson was the third Bengal in the past eight days to get arrested (Adam "Pacman" Jones and Marvin White were both arrested in the last week). Fortunately, the Bengals can use the lockout to no-comment the rash of arrests away.

"The team is aware of the incidents," Bengals public relations director Jack Brennan said, per Joe Reedy of the Cincinnati Enquirer. "However, as with most situations of this nature, it would be inappropriate for the team to comment until the matters are resolved through normal legal channels."

Unfortunately, as Reedy notes, Cincinnati leads the league in arrests since 2000, with 35! 

That's not something they'll likely comment on now either, and it might not be anything too surprising (it is the Bengals) but it's still a disturbingly high number of arrests.

The -- somewhat anyway -- good news is that such a run on legal issues isn't a problem that stems out of the lockout and an associated rise in crime (you may recall noted sociologist Ray Lewis' theory on this).

It's a problem that stems specifically from the Bengals organization, and probably why the "national media continues to hammer" them for basically everything.

And much like Cincy suddenly rising up and winning a Super Bowl, change isn't something you should expect to see until there's a systematic overhaul of the franchise.

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Posted on: July 15, 2011 5:55 pm
Edited on: July 15, 2011 7:34 pm
 

Carson Palmer 'laying low,' no word on future

Posted by Ryan Wilson

We're about to have football for the first time in some four months. And once a new collective bargaining agreement is in place, things will move at a blistering pace, starting with free agency.

For quarterback Carson Palmer that means making a decision on his future even though he's still under contract with the Bengals. He threatened to retire earlier this offseason and hasn't shown signs of changing his mind. The problem: Cincy owner Mike Brown, known as much for his willfulness as his frugality, has no plans to trade Palmer. Which means that the two are at an impasse.

Joe Reedy of the Cincinnati Enquirer spotted Palmer at the Edgewood Tahoe Golf Course driving range in advance of the American Century Championship celebrity event, and asked him about his current situation with the Bengals.

Palmer had no comment and told Reedy he is "laying low" until the lockout is resolved.

Part of us wonders if the four months away from the NFL grind (which is no doubt exacerbated by playing in Cincy where the circus is in town every day) has softened Palmer's stance on retirement. With the NFL season not yet officially underway there's no reason to announce now that he'll return to the Bengals, but he's just 31 years old. It's not like he's hobbled by injuries or old age, and presumably he's as competitive as he was when Cincinnati selected him first overall in the 2003 draft.

It's hard to imagine that any player in their prime would bench themselves for an entire season; plenty of them say it but very few actually go through with it.

For now, Palmer's in Tahoe participating in a celebrity golf tournament. And while we'll have to wait to see what happens in the coming days and weeks, this much is certain: Dhani Jones, under no circumstances, wants to see Carson's brother Jordan Palmer under center for the Bengals. Even though, you know, there's no guarantee Cincy will re-sign Jones who, according to one list (feel free to guess which one), is one of the ten best linebackers in the NFL.

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Posted on: July 2, 2011 3:27 pm
Edited on: July 2, 2011 8:13 pm
 

Jerry Jones: Revenue sharing is 'on it's way out'

Posted by Will Brinson

The matter of sharing revenue is a big deal for the NFL and NFLPA. In fact, most people would probably agree it's the biggest deal with respect to the current labor negotiations.

However, the issue of revenue sharing between owners is also a tremendous obstacle that the owners have to overcome before finding common ground with the players.

And if you think it's not a problem, then you haven't heard Cowboys owner Jerry Jones talk about how the rest of the owners are helping to pay for the Vikings new stadium.

"Right now, we are subsidizing this market," Jones said, via the St. Paul Pioneer Press. "It's unthinkable to think that you've got the market you got here - 3.5 million people - and have teams like Kansas City and Green Bay subsidizing the market. That will stop.

"That's going to stop. That's on its way out."

As Liz Mullen of the Sports Business Journal noted on Twitter, there's a reason why this subject has not been written about much despite being an important matter: the owners aren't going to budge off their stance.

Well, at least the rich(er) ones anyway: Jones and the rest of the owners with extraordinary deep pockets were talked into revenue sharing for the first time in the last CBA deal.

And such distribution of money, along with the revenue split given to the players, was precisely why they opted out of the deal that they agreed to back in 2006. (Ironically, Mike Brown of the Bengals and Ralph Wilson of the Bills were the only two owners to oppose the deal.)

It's also one of the unstated obstacles to a new CBA; you might hear talk from ownership of player factions during this process, but the notion that the owners are completely unified is just silly.

There are owners who want more money from other owners, and there are owners who don't want go hand out additional money simply because they're more committed to generating revenue by investing in their product.

From a negotiating standpoint, this is problematic, because the various factions of owners have differing viewpoints on splitting up the $2 billion pie of revenue.

But it's something that'll have to be bridged before the NFL and NFLPA can reach a deal; and Jones' hardline stance could be an indication that everyone's on the same page.

Or an ominous forewarning that there's some clear-cut dissonance amongst owners on the topic.

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Posted on: June 30, 2011 1:43 pm
Edited on: June 30, 2011 2:27 pm
 

Ocho on Marvin Lewis: 'I'm going to whup his ass'

Posted by Will Brinson

This is going to sound like a story we've already written once or twice this summer (no, no, it has nothing to do with Kenny Britt), but apparently Chad Ochocinco and Bengals coach Marvin Lewis are not BFF's at the moment.

In fact, Ocho recently told a radio station that he was going to "whup [Marvin's] ass" because of the shots that Lewis has taken over the summer at Ochocinco.

"I don’t know. Hopefully Marvin is doing this maybe to help me out," Ochocinco told The 2 Live Stews, via Sports Radio Interviews. "Maybe he is trying to cause some friction between himself and me. Maybe he doesn’t like me for real. He doesn’t like me well I don’t like him either. Maybe he’s doing this to help the situation out.

"Maybe he’s trying to do this to show Mike Brown I don’t think I can coincide with Chad, but dammit I can’t coincide with him either and if he really feels that way when I see him I’m going to whup his ass.”

I could have SWORN that Ocho already said this about Marvin Lewis at one point this year, but maybe I'm wrong.

Let's see here … *flips through file* … he's ridden bulls, he's reportedly lost his work ethic, he's scouted incoming rookies, he's threatened to change his name (again), he's promised to wrestle alligators, he's tried out for an MLS team, he's -- ah, here we go.

He's complained about Marvin Lewis using the word "ass" already this offseason.

Hopefully you'll pardon me for the confusion.

 
 
 
 
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