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Tag:Mike McCarthy
Posted on: June 14, 2011 11:45 am
Edited on: June 14, 2011 11:57 am
 

McCarthy not worried Packers aren't working out

Posted by Ryan Wilson

Opinions vary on the long-term importance of player-organized workouts. The lockout prohibits coaches and players from communicating, so until there's a new CBA, these informal training sessions are all we have. Or, if you're the defending champion Green Bay Packers, you forgo the workouts altogether and wait for the season to officially begin.

It's one thing for the Carolina Panthers to take this approach; they would immediately be ridiculed for not wanting to improve on last year's 2-14 season. It's something else entirely when the Super Bowl champs do it. It's akin to fans and media mocking the Raiders for taking on Randy Moss' baggage but praising the Patriots for doing the same thing a few years later. The difference: Bill Belichick has earned the benefit of the doubt.

Same deal with the Packers. And perhaps it's why we haven't heard much consternation about the fact that they haven't held informal get-togethers during the lockout. Green Bay head coach Mike McCarthy, appearing on ESPN Milwaukee with Jason Wilde, addressed the issue Monday.

“I’m more interested in them being together as a group for Greg Jennings’ event or Donald Driver’s event," McCarthy said. "I think that’s as important as them going onto the field and trying to manufacture a practice. I think anytime you have a group of people, especially professionals, there’s other factors involved that obviously have to deal with risk. Part of our business in the training environment is risk assessment.

"It’s important for these players when they do come together for the first time that there’s a progression you go through as you get ready as a group. I know in my heart that every one of them has been taking care of business on an individual basis, and I know some of them have gotten together in small groups. They’ll be ready.”

Seems perfectly reasonable to us.

It also parallels the observations Browns tackle Joe Thomas made this week when he said that fewer OTA and minicamp sessions during the offseason might be better for the players in the long run.

Giants quarterback Eli Manning called the workouts "better than nothing," which isn't exactly a ringing endorsement for their effectiveness.

"It's kind of the best we can do under the circumstances," Manning said Monday, according to the New York Daily News. … "[The sessions were] really to just kind of get some of the young guys out there, to get Jerrel (Jernigan, the Giants' third-round pick) and some of the draft picks, to get them to meet some of the guys, learn a little bit of the terminology," Manning said. "You get worried. You don't know how long this lockout is going to be, where if it goes too long they'll never be able to catch up and it'll be a wash of a year for them. You're trying to prevent that."

Manning's less concerned with the veterans. "You can get your timing in training camp," Manning said. "We've got guys that have been there before."

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Posted on: March 24, 2011 10:17 am
 

Hot Routes 3.24.11 lockout side effects

Hot Routes

Posted by Andy Benoit

Posted on: March 18, 2011 9:56 am
Edited on: March 21, 2011 10:35 am
 

Offseason Checkup: Green Bay Packers

Posted by Andy Benoit



Eye on Football's playing doctor for every NFL team with our Offseason Check-ups. Also, check out our checkup podcast:


In the postseason, this 10-6 number six seed got white hot and wound up bringing the Lombardi Trophy back home. Aaron Rodgers played the quarterback position as masterfully as anyone in the last five years. In three of Green Bay’s four playoff games, Rodgers threw three touchdowns and posted a passer rating above 110. The offense was aided by the emergence of running back James Starks, who helped lend balance to Mike McCarthy’s de facto spread West Coast system. But with the way Green Bay’s passing game was clicking, a backfield feature Gilbert Brown Frank Winters probably could have sufficed.

It’s easy to play offense when you have a defense that surrendered more than 20 points in only three games all season. Dom Capers was brilliant in concocting a byzantine 3-4 scheme built around the versatility of rover Charles Woodson, pass-rushing prowess of Clay Matthews, athleticism of corners Sam Shields and Tramon Williams and strength of the B.J. Raji-led front line.


Success, depth
NFL Offseason

Backup receivers Jordy Nelson and James Jones both had 45-plus catches and 550-plus yards in 2010. Don’t expect that to be the case in 2011. Tight end Jermichael Finley will be healthy and once again manning the slot in three-and four-receiver formations. Finley, the team’s most lethal weapon, will be priority No. 1. (Note: With Nelson and Jones both on the rise, it’s possible that veteran Donald Driver could become the forgotten wideout.)

With Finley being versatile enough to line up anywhere, we’ll likely see more formation shifts from Green Bay before the snap. For a defensive coordinator, that’s a terrifying thought given how shrewd Rogers is already in the presnap phase.


Not to cop out, but there aren’t any. When you lead your conference in injuries, all holes on your roster will be exposed. Unless, of course, you somehow plug them again and again. That’s exactly what the Packers did in 2010. Consequently, this team is now two deep at every position.

Of course, if you want to push the issue, you could argue for:

1. Backup interior lineman
The Packers brass is said to be high on Marshall Newhouse, but the fifth-round pick from a year ago is yet to see the field. Veteran utility backup Jason Spitz is injury prone and not likely to be back.

2. Outside linebacker
Snatching someone who can start ahead of Clay Matthews wouldn’t be a bad idea if the right player is available. Because of injuries, Brad Jones, Brady Poppinga, Frank Zombo and Erik Walden all started games at this spot last season. The athletic Jones was the best of the bunch, but even he did not shine as a surefire first-stringer.

3. Defensive rover
Charles Woodson isn’t going to live forever. And the 34-year-old is somewhat injury prone, anyway. Replacing the über-versatile veteran is next to impossible, but if Ted Thompson sees a safety he likes (and Woodson is more of a safety than corner these days), he could give his likely future Hall of Famer an understudy. Jarrett Bush, of course, filled in admirably when Woodson was out during the second half of Super Bowl XLV, but Dom Capers still had to trim his playbook.


Anything short of a Super Bowl repeat would be a failure. Every time a team wins a title, scores of hackneyed pundits squawk about how we could be seeing the beginning of a dynasty. That sentiment actually feels true with these Packers.

Rodgers is in his prime. So is the rest of the offense, which happens to be stacked at all the skill positions. Defensively, Dom Capers is the best in the business when it comes to in-game adjustments and variations of 3-4 blitzes. Capers has all the pieces he had in 2010, which includes four Pro Bowlers plus ascending NT B.J. Raji.

The lockout helps the Packers more than most teams because they’re deep and their core has been together for three years now.

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Posted on: March 7, 2011 1:56 pm
Edited on: March 7, 2011 1:57 pm
 

McCarthy even richer than we thought

Posted by Andy Benoit

It was originally believed that Mike McCarthy’s new contract was worth $5 million a season (a $1 million increase from his previous annual wage). Dan Pompei of the National Football Post says McCarthy’s deal is actually more lucrative than that.

“The reality,” Pompei writes, “according to those with knowledge of the deal, is he now will be paid $32.25 million over five years—an average of $6.45 million per season. What’s more, McCarthy is scheduled to receive more than half of his money—more than $8 million per year--in the first two years of the deal.”

This puts McCarthy near the very top of the coaching compensation mountain. It is believed that Bill Belichick and Mike Shanahan are the only coaches who have surpassed the $7 million annual threshold. Pete Carroll figures to be the third highest paid coach (five years, $33 million, according to the L.A. Times). After that would be McCarthy.

Interestingly enough, McCarthy’s negotiations with the Packers took place during the postseason, including during the week leading up to the Super Bowl. We’ll assume he had representatives doing most of the heavy lifting for him.

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Category: NFL
Posted on: March 4, 2011 5:42 pm
Edited on: March 4, 2011 5:50 pm
 

Packers sign McCarthy to extension

Posted by Andy Benoit

It was weeks ago that we learned Packers head coach Mike McCarthy was getting a new contract that would keep M. McCarthy (US Presswire)him with the club through 2015. Yet it wasn’t until late Friday that the Packers announced the move. (Also, this just in: Aaron Rodgers named MVP of Super Bowl XLV.)

The Packers and their five-year head coach were apparently dotting some I’s and crossing some T’s. McCarthy’s new deal is the same length as GM Ted Thompson. (And come to think of it, the Packers agreed to terms with Thompson in December, then waited several weeks to also announce that news at the end of the business on Friday. Why the low key approach with these things?)

The Packers did not disclose McCarthy’s new salary, but it’s believed that he’ll earn $5 million a season, which makes him one of the 10 highest paid coaches in the NFL.

“We are very pleased to finalize this agreement with Mike,” Thompson said. “He’s a good football coach, a good leader, and a good man. I look forward to working with Mike into the future.”

“I want to thank the Green Bay Packers, especially Mark Murphy and Ted Thompson, for the continued commitment and confidence they have shown in our program,” McCarthy said. “We were very excited to bring the Lombardi Trophy back home this past season, and we look forward to the challenge of continuing to improve as a football team and adding to the championship legacy here. My family and I love being in Green Bay. It’s always going to be my home, and we are very happy to continue to be a part of this community.”

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Category: NFL
Posted on: March 2, 2011 2:22 pm
 

Hot Routes 3.2.11: Gary Wichard got served

Posted by Will Brinson



Got a link for the Hot Routes? Hit us up on Twitter (@CBSSportsNFL).
  • The North Carolina Secretary of State's office sent a search warrant to Bank of America demanding a pile of financial records relating to suspended NFL agent Gary Wichard's financial activity from January 2009 on. This is important to the NFL, because it could -- conceivably -- open up a can of worms with relation to other players, other coaches and pay-for-play accusations. It's way more important to the NCAA side of things, however, because Elaine Marshall's office is currently investigating the big pile of dirty things that happened on Chapel Hill's campus. Of course, Marvin Austin, the guy at the center of this warrant, is about to be an NFL'er, so there's that too.
Posted on: February 15, 2011 11:52 pm
 

Report: Packers lock up McCarthy through 2015

Posted by Andy Benoit

The details are starting to leak on Mike McCarthy’s much-anticipated contract extension. According to Bob McGinn of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, the Super Bowl XLV winning coach will soon sign a deal worth $5 million a sM. McCarthy (US Presswire)eason to remain in Green Bay through 2015.
This would make McCarthy one of the 10 highest paid coaches in the NFL.

Negotiations with McCarthy’s new agent – former NFL defensive end Trace Armstrong – have been ongoing since January. In December, the Packers agreed to a three-year extension with general manager Ted Thompson, who is now under contract through 2015. His average compensation is reportedly $2.5 million.

The 58-year-old Thompson and 47-year-old McCarthy are 53-34 since joining the Packers in 2006.

McGinn points out that it’s a little unusual for a head coach to renegotiate his contract with two years remaining on his original deal. But, in a way, McCarthy earned it based off the decision he made upon joining club.

McGinn writes, “When McCarthy was hired by the Packers in January 2006, he gambled on himself by taking a three-year contract rather than a four- or five-year deal. His thinking was that the short-team deal would enable him to get back to the bargaining table soon because he was confident the Packers were going to win under him.

His initial three-year, $5.1 million contract averaged $1.7 million. According to a source, it contained salaries of $1.5 million in 2006, $1.7 million in '07 and $1.9 million in '09.”

The Packers have a roster poised to be near the top of the NFL for at least the next four years. Now, the leaders overseeing that roster are entrenched for that time.

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Posted on: February 13, 2011 1:15 pm
Edited on: February 13, 2011 1:25 pm
 

Packers' Flynn drawing a lot of trade interest?

Posted by Will Brinson

There are three names -- Kevin Kolb, Donovan McNabb, Vince Young -- that really stand out when discussing free agent or trade options for teams in need of a quarterback. But it might be time to add a fourth: Matt Flynn.

The Packers backup quarterback, who nearly took down the Patriots in their Week 15 Sunday night primetime matchup, is drawing a lot of attention from other teams, according to Dan Pompei of the National Football Post.

Pompei cites Green Bay sources who believe Flynn is "ready to start" -- the obstacle to that is, clearly, Aaron Rodgers.

Green Bay doesn't likely want to get rid of Flynn, but he's "developed consistently" under Mike McCarthy and the current Packers coaching staff, and it's hard to imagine that his value will get too much higher than it is right now.

Because there are so many quarterback-needy teams -- Carolina, Washington, Minnesota, Seattle, San Francisco, Arizona, Miami and Tennessee all fall under the "immediately desperate" category -- the Packers stand a good chance of getting a high draft pick in exchange for their backup. 

Pompei believes it's possible for Green Bay to pull a second-rounder, and that seems like pretty fair market value. Although if that's the case, you can probably rule Carolina, Washington and Minnesota out of the running -- the Panthers don't have a second-rounder, the 'Skins just traded a second-rounder for a QB last year and the Vikings are in the same division. 

But if one of those other teams really wants a quarterback right now, and they see the draft as the only opportunity, a second-rounder for a young, ready-to-start QB like Flynn might seem like pretty good value, as opposed to reaching for a project like Ryan Mallett or Jake Locker. Especially when you consider what Washington paid for McNabb last year.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com