Tag:Nick Collins
Posted on: September 29, 2010 11:01 am
Edited on: September 29, 2010 2:43 pm
 

NFL looking into Collins incident

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

N. Collins got into a dispute with a Chicago fan after the fan allegedly used a racial slur against Collins.

Credit: Fox6Now.com

In a rather disgusting incident, Packers S Nick Collins, in the moments after Green Bay took a disappointing loss to the Bears on Monday Night Football, got into a confrontation with a Chicago fan.

Will got into it in this post, and as seen in this video on SPORTSbyBROOKS.com, Collins can be seen yelling and chucking his mouth guard into the stands.

He might have had a good reason to be upset.

Apparently, a Bears fan hurled the N-word slur at Collins and spit at him, hitting Collins in the face as he tried to give away his gloves to a Packers fan. Predictably – and understandably – that pissed off Collins. Now, as the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel writes, the NFL is looking into the incident.

"I was made aware of it by our security department," Packers coach Mike McCarthy said. "I have not seen the video. I know the NFL is looking into the matter. I understand Nick's story as far as what happened and what our security people that were there, and I support Nick 100 percent.”

These kinds of fans strike me as cowards of the highest order. Yeah, he could spit at Collins and use a racial epithet against him, because he was in the stands, about 10 feet above Collins.

But do you think if the fan met Collins on Lakeshore Drive, he’d have anything but nice things to say to Collins? It’d be something like, “Wow, Mr. Collins, it sure is great to meet you. I’m a big fan.”

There’d be no N-word, because the fan wouldn’t have a barrier protecting him from what I assume would be an angry, angry NFL player. A coward, I tell you.

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Posted on: September 28, 2010 11:56 am
Edited on: September 28, 2010 11:58 am
 

Report: Collins had altercation with Bears fan

Posted by Will Brinson

Credit: Fox6Now.com

Bears-Packers games are always a little bit heated, but according to Fox 6 Sports in Milwaukee , things got especially spicy during Monday night's Bears victory -- Packers safety Nick Collins and a Bears fan at Soldier Field supposedly got into some sort of "altercation" ensued.

Reportedly, a Bears fan called Collins the "N-word" while Collins was in the tunnel towards the locker room following the Bears' victory.

According to Fox 6 Sports, Collins claims that he "stopped, yelled at the fan and threw his mouthpiece at [the fan]" following the alleged racial slur.

About 11:45 PM EST Monday night, the news station tweeted that they were "being told Packers Nick Collins was provoked by a Bears fan (spitting). Collins threw tape (I think) at fan & was corralled by [Donald] Driver."

They also sensationalized the incident saying that "Nick Collins goes 'crazy' on a Bears fan while leaving the field & we have it all on camera !! Only station with it recorded !!"

The above tweet is odd, too, because it comes after the news station claimed that "off camera" Collins mentioned the racial slur and "apologizes to all fans for his actions."

Assuming that the incident happened (they haven't aired the video of it yet, but as you can see from the screen shot above, via the station's website, there is something happening) as reported, there's a good chance that the NFL will investigate it.

There also seems to be a good chance, if the video can prove that Collins was provoked by a racial slur from a fan, that he'll get off lightly from this incident.

Absent that proof, though, expect him to get leveled with a pretty hefty fine -- he's already apologized for (read: admitted) his actions and since player-fan interactions at games are a serious deal for any sports league, it's hard to imagine that the NFL would just let this one slide.
Posted on: September 28, 2010 12:19 am
 

Packers-Bears reaction

Chicago pulled out a victory to get to 3-0 on the season. Chicago WR R. Davis celebrates after the game (AP). Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Before the season began, I was pretty sure Chicago was overrated. I had never been impressed with the consistency of QB Jay Cutler. I didn’t think RB Matt Forte could be effective. I was weary about offensive coordinator Mike Martz. The defense would be fine – actually, I expected it to be very good – but I didn’t think the offense could keep the team in games.

Through three games – all Bears victories, including a less-than-impressive win in the season-opener against Detroit – there are still plenty of questions for the offense. But then again, the defense has been very good, and Cutler has done well enough to lead Chicago to the top of the NFC North division.

“It’s fun,” Cutler told ESPN’s Suzy Kolber after the game. “That’s all you can ask for. The defense did a great job. We still felt the whole game we were killing ourselves. But we came up big at the end of the night.”

OK, let’s talk about the real reason Chicago won or – more appropriately – how the Packers lost this game.

Green Bay outgained Chicago 379-298, but the Packers blew it for themselves. They tied a club record that had stood since 1945 with 17 penalties for 152 yards. Many of them, especially late in the game, were undisciplined and, frankly, stupid. Frank Zombo had a helmet-to-helmet hit on Cutler that wiped out an interception. There was the bad personal foul penalty by Nick Collins, and there was a horrendous pass interference by Morgan Burnett to give Bears possession deep in Packers territory.

If Burnett’s pass interference was horrendous, the play of Green Bay’s special teams was atrocious. Bears returner Devin Hester ran back a punt return for a touchdown and should have had another (speaking of which, why in the hell are you kicking to him in the first place?). Bears DE Julius Peppers blocked a Mason Crosby FG attempt. Green Bay got nothing with their return game. And let’s not even get into that last-second kickoff return of desperation that featured about 15 forward passes (the flags were gone, and after the officials would finish throwing their hats, they were going to have to start throwing their whistles).

“You can’t play football like that,” Mike McCarthy said in the postgame presser when asked about the penalties.

That’s true, Mike. But let’s not let the coaching staff off the hook here. After James Jones’ fumble with a little more than 2 minutes to play gave the Bears possession near mid-field, for some reason – even though it should have been abundantly clear to whoever was speaking in McCarthy’s ear that the call was good – McCarthy threw the challenge flag.

It was pretty obvious after looking at one replay that the fumble recovery was legit. Yet McCarthy challenged and lost a timeout. It helped his squad lose the game (hey, at least the Packers would have had more time after Robbie Gould's field goal).

This was a game Green Bay should have won. This was a game the Bears should have lost.

And you know what? I still think Chicago is overrated.

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Posted on: August 14, 2010 8:44 pm
 

Jake Delhomme looks quite sharp for Browns early

Posted by Will Brinson

Jake Delhomme's been a running joke for interception funny-makers ever since his playoff meltdown against the Cardinals in 2008. The level of attention his failures received only increased when he joined the Cleveland Browns, an organization not exactly associated with success.

Throw the "Come on, it's the preseason!" flags at me all you want, but he looked really sharp on the Browns' first possession against the Packers Saturday night, going 6/7 for 66 yards as the Browns marched down the field before Jerome Harrison punched the ball in for Cleveland's first touchdown of 2010.

Delhomme's only incompletion was a pass intended for Brian Robiskie -- and it was only incomplete because Nick Collins made a very nice play on it. Otherwise, Delhomme spread the ball around, hitting Evan Moore and Mohamed Massaquoi twice each.

He worked once out of the gun and once out of an empty-back set (on fourth down no less) and generally looked as comfortable as he did during his heyday with the Panthers.

That's not to say that Carolina should immediately regret their decision, but based on (very) early returns, it seems like Cleveland won't regret theirs. At the very least, he's an upgrade over the Derek Anderson - Brady Quinn debacle that was 2009.


Posted on: June 30, 2010 12:06 pm
Edited on: June 30, 2010 3:31 pm
 

Positional rankings: Safeties

As we wave goodbye to offseason news and as we wait for the regular season to begin – or, at the very least, training camp and the preseason – we fill our days with thoughts of the abstract, and we ponder questions that can never be truly answered. Who are the best players in the NFL at their position? What separates the top man at his spot from No. 4 and No. 5?

Well, we’re attempting to answer that in June and July. Andy and Josh will explore each position on the field and debate the merits and flaws
of each player. Clearly, it’s reasonable for smart men to disagree, and these arguments during the next few weeks will only reinforce that notion. Even as we watch film, talk to NFL insiders and conduct our own painstaking research, our top-five lists, though they’ll likely bear some similarities, will disagree. Which makes this whole endeavor worthwhile.   

Today, we debate the top safeties – both free safeties and strong safeties.


Andy Benoit’s top five

Troy Polamalu (Getty Images)
5. Nick Collins, Packers

4. Brian Dawkins, Broncos

3. Darren Sharper, Saints


2. Ed Reed, Ravens

1. Troy Polamalu, Steelers


The safety position has become the lynchpin to so many of the complex defensive schemes we see in today’s NFL. Versatility is key. On that note, Polamalu is the most valuable defensive player in the NFL. He is a thumper against the run, he has fantastic range in coverage and, wherever he is on the field, he’s a first-class playmaker.

Polamalu’s presence is what enables Steelers defensive coordinator Dick LeBeau to be aggressive in his scheme. We saw last season that when Polamalu is out of the lineup, the Steelers D can be reactionary.

Reed makes the list on the assumption that his bum hip won’t be a major issue come September. He may be the best centerfielder in NFL history. Sharper is an interception machine and, more importantly, a leader. Without his stability in the New Orleans’ secondary last season, we’d have a different defending Super Bowl champ right now. Dawkins turns 35 this season but hasn’t lost a step. Amazing. Collins has become a regular at the Pro Bowl. His instincts have improved every year, plus, he’s not a bad tackler.

Josh Katzowitz’s top five

5. Bob Sanders, Colts

4. Bernard Pollard, Texans

3. Brian Dawkins, Broncos

2. Ed Reed, Ravens

1. Troy Polamalu, Steelers



Well, it’s hard to argue against Polamalu. He’s the safety who scares every QB in the league, and you could really see the impact on his team when he was injured last season. The frenetic, sideline-to-sideline impact Polamalu made simply wasn’t there.

As long as Ed Reed is healthy and returns to play – he recently said he’s about 35 percent healthy, which doesn’t sound promising – he’s No. 2. Not much to be said about Dawkins – one of the top safeties in NFL history. Pollard flies under the radar because he spent his first couple years in the league with Kansas City and he hasn’t been a Pro Bowler, but he’s amassed 289 tackles in the past three seasons to go with four interceptions and three fumble recoveries in just 13 games last year. Was it coincidence that, when Pollard signed with Houston, the Texans’ total defensive yards and defensive rushing yards decreased dramatically? I don’t think so.

Sanders hasn’t played much the past few years because of knee and arm injuries, but, at the age of 29, he’s still in his prime and still has the talent that led him to two Pro Bowls and the 2007 NFL’s defensive player of the year honor. Yes, he’s not healthy very much, but when he is, he’s one of the top guys in the league. I like Nick Collins as well and I think his stock is rising, but I just don’t think he’s a top-five guy yet.

Andy’s rebuttal


I like that you went with Pollard – that shows you’re paying attention. Few people even know about the fifth-year pro. The Texans put Pollard in attack mode last season – as opposed to react mode that Kansas City stuck him in – and he blossomed. Pollard is a formidable run-stopper and underrated playmaker. I want to see him perform at a high level for a 16-game span before giving him the nod, though.

Shortly after writing my list, Texans tight end Owen Daniels told me in a phone interview that Sanders is the best opponent he’s faced. That made me regret not including the former Defensive Player of the Year. Honestly, I love the guy. But the fact of the matter is, Sanders is made of glass and the Colts were 14-2 without him last season.

Someone else we both need to consider is Saints strong safety Roman Harper. He’s the X-factor in Gregg Williams’ aggressive blitz scheme.

Josh’s final word


Yeah, I had reservations about Sanders, because he’s played eight games the past two years, and how can you call a guy a top-five safety when he’s played so little?

You’re right about Harper. The guy can flat-out tackle, he’s a force when he crosses the line of scrimmage and gets into his opponent’s offensive backfield, and he’s coming off a heck of a year.

It’s funny, though. Three guys on my list (Polamalu, Reed and Sanders) are coming off major injuries. Two guys on your list are at least 34 (Sharper and Dawkins), Reed is 31 and Polamalu is 29. Which tells us what exactly? I don’t know. Maybe they just don’t make Hall of Fame safeties like they used to, or maybe the younger safeties are just extremely mediocre. Either way, enjoy the safeties on our list for as long as they’re playing. Some of them won’t be around much longer.

--Josh Katzowitz and Andy Benoit

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