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Tag:Vincent Jackson
Posted on: September 20, 2011 2:13 pm
Edited on: September 20, 2011 2:19 pm
 

No deals for Solai, V-Jax, but Ngata blockbuster?

Posted by Will Brinson

Tuesday at 4 p.m. ET is the deadline to extend players who received franchise tags in the offseason. According to CBS Sports Charley Casserly, Dolphins defensive tackle Paul Solai and Chargers wide receiver Vincent Jackson won't be joining the number of players who were franchise tagged and also received a long-term extension from their respective clubs.

Reports are beginning to circulate that Ngata could receive a "blockbuster" contract, however.

Solai, Jackson, Ngata and Browns kicker Phil Dawson are the only remaining players who received a franchise tag and who were not given long-term deals.

Given the current timeframe for completing a deal -- roughly two hours -- it seems pretty unlikely that any of the players will actually see big money before the offseason.

Dawson, in his late 30's, wouldn't represent good value for the Browns anyway, and is highly unlikely to get a long-term deal.

Ngata is arguably the Ravens best defensive player, and you can be sure that Ravens want to get him signed to a lengthy contract. They're running short on time, but Aaron Wilson of the Cook County Times reports that the Ravens are "on the verge of striking a blockbuster deal" with Ngata before the 4 p.m. deadline Tuesday.

Jackson's lack of a deal is the least surprising news, given the discord between he and the Chargers during the past several years as A.J. Smith has steadfastly refused to give Jackson big-time money, and Jackson held out for 10 games in 2010.

Though the players would become unrestricted free agents after this year, they're all still eligible to be franchise-tagged for a second consecutive year.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.
Posted on: August 5, 2011 3:53 pm
Edited on: August 5, 2011 4:01 pm
 

Chargers reach agreement with WR Malcom Floyd

Posted by Ryan Wilson

The Ravens, with a huge need for a big-play wide receiver to line up opposite Anquan Boldin, had an offer on the table for Malcom Floyd*. On Friday, Floyd, who spent the previous seven seasons in San Diego mostly as a backup, re-signed with the Chargers.

Chargers.com reports that the team reached an agreement with Floyd on a two-year deal.

“We have a lot of happy Chargers today with the return of Malcom,” General Manager A.J. Smith said. “He has been an integral part of our team and it’s great to have him back. He is a very talented receiver and that will just add to the continuity of our offensive unit.”

In 2010, Floyd caught 37 passes for 717 yards (19.4 ypc) and 6 TDs. The season before, he hauled in 45 passes for 776 yards (17.2 ypc) and 1 TD. At 6-5, Floyd is an obvious red-zone target, but he's also capable of stretching the field as evidenced by his DeSean Jacksonian yards-per-catch average. He'll rejoin another 6-5 pass-catcher, Vincent Jackson, as well as Patrick Crayton, Kelley Washington, Laurent Robinson and highly touted rookie Vincent Brown as potential options for QB Philip Rivers.

Floyd will likely be the second or third WR in a Chargers' offense that features tight end Antonio Gates and one of the NFL's best quarterbacks.

At the other end of the spectrum are the Ravens, who have been trying desperately to find legit pass-catching options for young QB Joe Flacco. As it stands, Baltimore has Boldin, rookie Torrey Smith and, well, not much else. Thirty-seven-year-old Derrick Mason could return (despite his age, he has been productive for the Ravens), and perhaps the organization will make a run at recently released Jets wideout Jerricho Cotchery.

We have yet to play a preseason game but Ravens fans are already questioning if Flacco can lead the team to a Super Bowl. We're not absolving Flacco of blame in Baltimore's recent playoff losses, but it would certainly be a lot easier for him if he had someone to throw the ball to.

* UPDATE: According to Jamison Hensley of the Baltimore Sun, the Ravens had trouble clearing enough cap room for Floyd.

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Posted on: July 26, 2011 2:24 pm
 

Mankins, Jackson to sign tenders, report on time?

Posted by Will Brinson



Remember Logan Mankins and Vincent Jackson? Yeah, you probably do -- they held out for a long time in 2010 and then were involved in this little Brady v. NFL lawsuit that nearly caused us to lose football in 2011.

Here's some good news then: Mankins and Jackson will both, reportedly, show up and sign their respective tenders and join their respective camps on time.

Per Scott Bair of the North County Times, Jackson will sign his franchise tag on Friday. Adam Schefter of ESPN initially reported that Mankins would report and put his ink the Patriots tender.

Mankins will make $10.73 million this year, while Jackson will receive $11.93 million.

Both players are eligible for a long-term extension from their respective teams, though such a deal would need to be in place by 4:00 p.m. ET on September 20, according to the new league rules.

In other words, we'll find out quickly just how much of a relationship is remaining between the two named plaintiffs and their respective front offices.

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Posted on: July 24, 2011 9:38 am
Edited on: July 25, 2011 9:38 am
 

NFL Lockout almost over, CBA finished

Smith, GoodellPosted by Josh Katzowitz

The labor deal -- and the path to NFL football in 2011 -- is finally, truly done. Well, almost.

That’s the report from CBSSports.com’s own Mike Freeman, who writes that the owners and players have agreed to a new CBA.

"It's done," one player source told Freeman. "We have an agreement. Now we just have to vote."

[More from Mike Freeman: Lockout updates]

Now, the majority of the players (50 percent, plus one) have to agree to the deal in order to end the lockout for good. Players will fly into Washington on Sunday in order to go over last-minute details. They’re then expected to vote Monday, and a news conference should occur shortly thereafter.

According to ESPN’s Adam Schefter, once the deal is ratified, free agency and training camp likely will begin on the same day.

Saturday was a huge day in moving along negotiations, and NFLPA executive director DeMaurice Smith and NFL commissioner Roger Goodell reportedly worked hard together to make sure there wasn’t any additional trouble between the two sides.

On Monday, the NFLPA executive committee will meet in Washington, and it’ll pass along its recommendations to the players -- to ratify the new CBA AND to reform the NFLPA as a union -- who will have to sign off on both deals in order to begin the new league year.

The plaintiffs in the Brady v NFL case (including Chargers WR Vincent Jackson, who reportedly dropped his demand to be paid $10 million or be exempt from the franchise tag) would then have to consent to the deal, and the lawsuit -- and any other judicial matters between the two sides -- would be kaput.

And most importantly, we’d have football again.

UPDATED (11:46 a.m. ET): Freeman is reporting that the new league year can't start until the fifth day after the CBA is ratified and signed, and training camps couldn't start until two days after that. So, we still have a little time before the players officially get back to work.

UPDATED (12:29 p.m. ET): If you wanted a small dash of cold water on your red-hot "LOCKOUT IS ALMOST OVER" news, the Associated Press provides it for you. In its small story about the NFLPA executive committee meeting Monday, the AP cites sources that it's not certain whether a vote will be held to recommend the deal. So, keep that in mind before you start partying too hard tonight.

UPDATED (1:15 p.m. ET): While CBSSports.com's Clark Judge reports that the NFLPA is still trying to tweak the opt-out clause in the new CBA (or the fact there is no opt-out clause), he also writes that it's not a deal-breaker. Probably because it'll be a hard sell to the owners -- who, you'll recall, opted out of the last CBA. The players would like to get an opt-out clause after the eighth year of the 10-year CBA.

UPDATED (1:19 p.m. ET): Freeman writes that team facilities will be open to players from when the new CBA is signed until training camp begins. Which is not unexpected, but probably necessary.

UPDATED (9:22 p.m. ET): Jason LaCanfora of NFL.com writes that Saints QB Drew Brees has sent an e-mail to teammates saying it's "expected" that the new CBA deal will be signed Monday. But Brees also, not surprisingly, hedged his bets, writing that the final ratification could come Tuesday or Wednesday as well.

Brees also writes that free agency could start as early as Friday. Saints training camp, says Brees, would open July 31 with a 2 p.m. meeting.

UPDATED (9:37 a.m. ET, Monday): NFL owners and players agreed early Monday to the terms of a deal to end the lockout, and players were expected to begin the voting process later in the day, two people familiar with the negotiations told The Associated Press.

The NFLPA executive committee is expected to meet Monday and vote on the final agreement around 11:00 a.m. ET.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.
Posted on: July 23, 2011 9:47 am
Edited on: July 23, 2011 9:56 am
 

Report: Jackson will sign off on settlement

Posted by Ryan Wilson

Friday evening, Eye on Football's Will Brinson outlined what needs to happen in the coming days for both the owners and players to agree on a new collective bargaining agreement and for there to be a 2011 NFL season.

One of the ancillary issues involves Chargers wide receiver Vincent Jackson, who also happens to be one of the named plaintiffs in the Tom Brady v. NFL lawsuit. According to a report earlier this week, Jackson was seeking either $10 million or to immediately become an unrestricted free agent before he would sign off on a settlement.

ESPN's Adam Schefter tweeted Saturday morning that Jackson is "now is willing to release his claim without compensation."

(Patriots lineman Logan Mankins allegedly made similar demands, which his agent refuted. Either way, Mankins said Thursday that he will sign off to settle the case without seeking compensation.)

There now appears to be one fewer obstacle between the owners, players and a 2011 season. More reason for optimism: CBSSports.com's Mike Freeman reported Friday that negotiations will continue through the weekend. "The players don't really need that much time to sort through the offer. … The issues remaining can be solved fairly easily and quickly if they wanted."

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Posted on: July 21, 2011 4:17 pm
Edited on: July 21, 2011 7:07 pm
 

Report: Mankins says he'll sign off on settlement

Posted by Will Brinson



UPDATE (6:30 p.m. EST): Ron Borges of the Boston Herald tweets on Thursday night that, "Logan Mankins has just informed the NFLPA leadership he will sign off on a settlement of the Brady v. NFL case without seeking compensation."

As the world turns in the NFL's Thursday afternoon labor soap opera, one critical issue remains: the financial demands of named-plaintiffs Logan Mankins and Vincent Jackson.

These demands have been characterized as a big stumbling block, since both players reportedly want $10 million each to settle the litigation. However, Mankins' agent, Frank Bauer, disputed the claim that his client ever made any sort of financial demand.

"I think it's really unfair what has happened to Logan Mankins in media characterizations that he is making monetary demands or holding up a settlement," Bauer said, per ESPN.
Latest on Lockout

"Logan Mankins is a young man who was encouraged and solicited into a lawsuit to help the union spearhead a new agreement. Logan's main concern for entering into as a plaintiff was to see if he can become free and help other players have less restrictions."

Of course, putting his name on the lawsuit WAS a tough decision and Mankins certainly put his name out there for scrutiny. So if he wanted something in return it wouldn't be shocking. But Bauer emphasized he "hasn't made any such demand."

"For people to say he has made monetary demands, he hasn't made any such demand," Bauer said. "We don't know terms. We haven't talked to (NFLPA attorney) Jeff Kessler. There has been no communication, but it's irresponsible to report Logan has made monetary demands.

"Are we disappointed there has been no communication? Hugely. He trusted the union and Kessler to fight for Logan Mankins and the other players."

So, yeah, wow, that's kind of a game-changer. If Mankins doesn't want money and if Jackson doesn't want money in exchange for settling the lawsuit, it's only going to crank up the vitriol for Kessler, the NFLPA lawyer.

And it means there's a pretty simple solution sitting out there: make Mankins and Jackson franchise-tag-free players going forward. If those two plaintiffs would agree to that in part of their settlement, it could move things along much more speedily than having the two sides quarrel about demands that apparently weren't ever made.

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Posted on: July 19, 2011 9:08 pm
Edited on: July 19, 2011 11:51 pm
 

What will the Brady v NFL plaintiffs receive?

BreesPosted by Josh Katzowitz

We’ve written the past day or two about the labor negotiations from the perspective of the plaintiffs in the Brady v NFL case and what they might want individually in return for settling the lawsuit against the league.

For example, Patriots G Logan Mankins and Chargers WR Vincent Jackson apparently are asking for $10 million apiece. Which naturally led to Vikings P Chris Kluwe calling the two of them, plus Saints QB Drew Brees and Colts QB Peyton Manning, “douchebags” on his Twitter account Tuesday.

The reason for Kluwe’s ire against Brees and Manning? The reports that they want a lifetime exemption from the franchise tagging system.

Brees, on his Twitter account, said to be wary of media reports on this subject, writing, "All media claims about me wanting a personal reward for this deal are false. I hope you all know me better than that." The Boston Globe’s Greg Bedard tweeted that Brees, Manning and Jackson have softened their stances in regards to individual lawsuit compensation.

Meanwhile, it seems like Jackson is willing to return to the Chargers and sign the $11 million franchise tag for 2011 (if there actually is a tag system in the new CBA), according to The San Diego Union-Tribune. Still, he’d (obviously) like a long-term contract and not the one-year tag money, but this way, I don’t see how Kluwe could be mad at him.

UPDATE 11:41 P.M. ET: According to the Boston Globe, the NFLPA's executive committee will recommend that the plaintiffs receive no special considerations as part of the lockout's end.

Writes Ron Borges: "It was determined it would be too cumbersome to try and work out individual deals. Since the bulk of plaintiffs were well-placed NFL veterans, the best way to go, it was decided, was to stick simply with the larger deal negotiated between the NFLPA and the league’s owners."

As far as "well-placed NFL veterans" go, I imagine Broncos rookie LB Von Miller would beg to differ on that point.

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Posted on: July 19, 2011 4:12 pm
Edited on: July 20, 2011 8:12 am
 

Vikings punter calls 4 named plaintiffs greedy

Posted by Ryan Wilson

This morning we noted that, as two of the 10 plaintiffs in the Brady v. the NFL case, Vincent Jackson and Logan Mankins could each ask for $10 million in compensation. At the time, the thinking was that the other plaintiffs wouldn't seek similarly high payouts because they either weren't in position to (free agents, already under contract, retired, etc.) or, as elite quarterbacks, already had all the leverage they needed.

Turns out, Peyton Manning and Drew Brees are also looking for settlements of their own. CBSSports.com's Mike Freeman writes that "Multiple sources say that Manning, one of the named plaintiffs, wants immediate free agency in order to settle the lawsuit. Those sources also say Brees wants to be a free agent next year. The sources say lawyers for the NFLPA have asked NFL owners for those two things in addition to the reported demands from Mankins and Jackson."

So, yeah, tying a nice little bow on a new collective bargaining agreement doesn't seem as close as it did just a few hours ago. That said, Freeman is confident a deal will get done this week.

So while all hope isn't lost, Viking punter Chris Kluwe is wholly unimpressed with the news that four of the 10 named plaintiffs (who, by the way, are supposed to be representing the other 1,896 NFL players) appear to be cutting their own deals. So, naturally, Kluwe took to Twitter to voice his displeasure.



That doesn't leave much room for interpretation. The problem, of course, is that, as Freeman pointed out this morning, a new CBA can't be agreed upon unless all the plaintiffs settle the case.

That's much easier when some of them aren't looking out just for themselves.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com