Tag:Steve Smith
Posted on: August 10, 2011 7:10 pm
Edited on: August 10, 2011 7:59 pm
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Steve Smith signs 1-year deal with Eagles

SmithPosted by Josh Katzowitz

All along, WR Steve Smith wanted to land a new contract with the Giants. He said so in July 2010 when, after catching a franchise-record 107 passes, he said he should be given a raise on his $550,000 salary. He thought so last March, claiming that the Giants had told him they’d take care of him.

Evidently, the Giants had a different idea about Smith’s value. And probably when he'd be healthy again.

And so, the Philadelphia Inquirer’s Jeff McLane was the first to report that the Eagles surprisingly have signed Smith to a one-year deal, giving the so-called Dream Team yet another talented piece. The Newark Star Ledger's Mike Garafolo reports that the contract is a one-year, $4 million deal (with $2 million guaranteed).

On his Facebook page, Smith wrote that Philadelphia showed him plenty of love (the bold below is mine):

"I will always cherish my time in NY and the super bowl victory.. This was obviously not an easy decision for me or something i ever expected but unfortunately the business aspect proved that the eagles wanted me to be part of their organization MUCH more than the Giants did.. A special thanks to my WR buddies, coach Gilbride, all of u amazing fans on here, and the entire giants organization for drafting me.. Time for a new beginning..."

He also told reporters on a conference call Wednesday that he thought he was "close" to returning to action.

Steve Smith's Eagles signing
The problem with Smith throughout his four-year career is that he’s been injury prone, particularly last season when he played only nine games after suffering a pectoral injury and then a knee injury that required the dreaded microfracture surgery.

The Giants were cautious to re-sign Smith because of that knee injury and the surgery and because Smith won't be available to start the season on the field.

Instead, Smith will get a chance to revitalize his career with Philadelphia, which has been having holdout issues with DeSean Jackson and illness issues with Jeremy Maclin (though McLane's source said the move had nothing to do with Maclin's health).

Said coach Andy Reid in a statement released by the team: "He's a Pro Bowl quality receiver that we will work into our offense as soon as he is ready to go."

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Posted on: August 9, 2011 1:32 pm
Edited on: August 9, 2011 3:59 pm
 

Steve Smith leaves practice with finger injury

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

UPDATED (2:58 p.m. ET): According to the Charlotte Observer's Joe Person, the X-rays on Steve Smith's finger were negative.

UPDATED (3:57 p.m. ET): CBSSports.com's Pete Prisco, embedded Tuesday with the Panthers, writes that Smith said he dislocated his finger and that he'll need stiches. Smith estimated he'd be out of action for 7-10 days.

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Reports coming out of Panthers camp, including that of Rapid Reporter Steve Reed, are stating that WR Steve Smith had to be carted out of practice because of an injury, though the Charlotte Observer’s Joe Person reports that Smith is suffering from only a finger injury. Smith

Smith walked off the field under his own power following his apparent injury. But then, he was carted back to the team locker room, presumably for observation, leading to temporary confusion among the press corps.

Person then tweeted that Smith was getting an X-ray on his finger.

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Posted on: August 7, 2011 11:28 am
 

Smith points finger at Fox for dwindling output

Posted by Ryan Wilson

It wasn't long ago that the Panthers' Steve Smith was considered one of the most dangerous wide receivers in the game. In recent years, however, his output has fallen off a cliff. He hauled in 78 passes for 1,421 yards in 2008 only to see his yards receiving drop by 439 yards from 2008 to 2009, and it dropped another 428 yards from '09 to '10 (to a six-year low of 554).

Smith's dwindling production coincides with Carolina's three-year slide from playoff team to one of the worst outfits in the league. Also not helping: the revolving door at quarterback; Jake Delhomme was released after the 2009 season, and Matt Moore and Jimmy Clausen combined for two wins in 2010. Now it's only a matter of time before 2011 first-overall pick Cam Newton finds the field.

It's a culmination of all these things, as well as the conservative system former head coach John Fox seemed to favor -- not Smith's age -- that had everything to do with decidedly pedestrian numbers. At least that's the story Smith's telling.

"I respect coach Fox and I respect the offensive coordinators that have been here," Smith said, according to the Charlotte Observer. "But at the same time I'm a wide receiver. Run blocking is not my forte.

"It is nice to have layers, have multiple sets, not to just be stacking to one spot for 70 plays," Smith said of Carolina's new offense now under the direction or Rob Chudzinski. "I get to line up in different spots. It's just refreshing. It's not saying, 'Well, we're going to move you around,' and then never do it. Here they're actually saying it and it's happening. It's not just me. It's other guys as well."

The Panthers are making a conscious decision to move away from Fox's run-first scheme. Last week the organization traded for former Bears tight end Greg Olsen, and Newton wasn't selected first overall to hand the ball off.

"The quarterbacks are doing what has not been done around here in a long time. The philosophy in years past has been not to screw it up," Smith said. "And here it's put your foot down on the gas pedal and go hard. So I like that."

One of the liberating things about going 2-14 in 2010 is that there isn't much pressure on the Panthers in 2011. New head coach Ron Rivera isn't yet on the hot seat (though we imagine it's only a matter of time), and expectations couldn't be lower. In that sense, it's a great time to be a Carolina fan. (Okay, that was a bit much, even for us.)

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Posted on: July 28, 2011 6:20 pm
Edited on: July 28, 2011 9:17 pm
 

TE Olsen traded to Panthers for draft pick

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

It was just a few hours ago when we told you that the Bears had put TE Greg Olsen on the trading block, as agent Drew Rosenhaus tweeted that Chicago was willing to be very “reasonable” in who they got for swapping Olsen.

The Panthers have taken the Bears up on the deal.

The Chicago Tribune is reporting that Olsen is on his way to Carolina in exchange for a player (not likely named Steve Smith) and for an undisclosed draft pick.

Olsen caught 41 passes last year for 404 yards and five touchdowns, and he’ll join a crowded tight end group in Carolina with Jeremy Shockey and Ben Hartsock already on the roster.

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Posted on: July 22, 2011 11:44 pm
Edited on: July 23, 2011 12:08 am
 

Chris Harris likes idea of Steve Smith to Bears

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

During the lockout and in lieu of free agency talk, we have spent much of our time debating whether Panthers WR Steve Smith will stay in Carolina or whether he’ll get the opportunity to bolt from the 2011 NFC South's future basement dweller.

Smith's Saga in Charlotte
He apparently wants to play for the Chargers or Ravens, but there’s little chance he’s going anywhere unless the Panthers get some kind of value for him from another team. (A third-round pick might just be the ticket.)

That said, Bears S Chris Harris has what he thinks is a pretty good idea -- Smith should just play in Chicago.

“If the opportunity is there, why not?” Harris said on WMVP-AM 1000, via the Chicago Tribune. “You can never have enough big-time playmakers on your team.”

Harris and Smith are former Panthers teammates, and they’ve also been workout partners this offseason. Although Smith is 32 years old and coming off one of the worst years in his career, Harris says Smith -- who most likely would rather play with Bears QB Jay Cutler than some combination of Cam Newton and Jimmy Clausen -- looks as good as ever in workouts.

"He is an excellent guy,” Harris said. “He's a guy who wants to win at all costs. He's a competitor. He's one of those scrappy kind of players you love to have on your team."

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Posted on: July 17, 2011 6:07 pm
Edited on: July 17, 2011 6:41 pm
 

Panthers' Smith interested in Chargers or Ravens?

Posted by Ryan Wilson

Wide receiver Steve Smith might regret not getting to know the rookies during a decade's worth of Panthers training camps, but that doesn't mean he's any more likely to want to stay in Carolina for an 11th NFL season.

Eye on Football blogging colleague Will Brinson wrote in May that Smith could be interested in the Raiders or Chargers, but pointed out that, "Smith doesn't exactly control his destiny in terms of where he'll end up in 2011, and you can expect the Panthers to use his value in an effort to try and rebuild on the fly."

And while we're so close to a new CBA and actual football, we're not there yet. Which means we're left to speculate and go on others' words. A source tells the Charlotte Observer's Tom Sorensen that the Chargers and Ravens are currently Smith's teams of choice.

Sorensen writes that "Although Smith, and not Julius Peppers, is the best player in Carolina history, the Panthers aren't obligated to trade him. It's not as if there's a lifetime achievement award he can parlay into a Get Out of Charlotte Free card. Depends what the Panthers can get for him.

Smith's Saga in Charlotte



"A third-round pick feels insufficient."

It feels insufficient until you remember that the Broncos might have to settle for a third-round pick for Kyle Orton, and the Steelers shipped Santonio Holmes to the Jets for a fifth-rounder last offseason. (Although that bargain-basement price tag had everything to do with Holmes' off-field troubles. But still, he was the Super Bowl MVP and the best pass catcher on the Jets in 2010 -- you'd think he'd still be worth more than that.)

Sorensen also notes that should Smith stay in Carolina he could serve as Cam Newton's security blanket, but that's part of the problem. As Brinson pointed out Saturday, "Smith wasn't a big fan of Jimmy Clausen [last season]. It's hard to blame him, because Clausen's ascension to the role of starter meant a serious step back for the passing game."

Plus, Smith's 32. He's not interested in being a part of the Panthers' rebuilding process; he wants to win now, while he still has a few good years left.  And in that regard, San Diego makes a lot of sense. In fact, when quarterback Philip Rivers was asked about the prospects in May, he was all for it.

"Bring him on," he said. "Hey, we've got a great deal of weapons here. I certainly appreciate each and every one of them. Any time you can add a guy of that caliber, I'm all for it."

As is Smith, we'd imagine.

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Posted on: July 16, 2011 12:21 pm
Edited on: July 16, 2011 4:00 pm
 

Steve Smith regrets not really knowing rookies

Posted by Will Brinson

From the get-go in 2010, it was kind of obvious that Steve Smith wasn't a big fan of Jimmy Clausen. It's hard to blame him, because Clausen's ascension to the role of starter meant a serious step back for the passing game.

But perhaps there's another underlying issue that's part of Smith's makeup? Well, maybe -- Smith talked to Yahoo! Sports' Doug Farrar recently, and indicated that over the last decade, he's purposely avoided becoming close with rookies. 

"One of the things I would like to accomplish is that for the last 10 years, I really haven't talked to a lot of rookies through training camp," Smith said. "It's really hard, because a lot of those guys get cut. I can remember that almost all of the wide receivers we drafted or were undrafted — there was a guy named Kevin Coffey from Virginia, and after he got cut, it was very difficult, because we hung out for so long.

Smith's Saga in Charlotte


"So, I didn't talk with a lot of the rookies and free agents until after final cuts, because I just didn't want to get emotionally attached. That's one thing I lost out on — there's probably about 10 or 12 guys over the last 10 years, but I've missed out on [developing relationships with] a lot of those rookies."

The full interview with Smith over at Shutdown Corner is absolutely worth reading. You can tell he's entering a phase of his career where he wants to move forward from past mistakes, but also finds himself looking back in an introspective fashion.

Seriously -- I'm not trying to over-blow it, but Smith opens up a ton with Farrar, and it's fascinating to see such a fiery, emotional competitor clearly at a career (and life) crossroads.

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Posted on: July 7, 2011 9:12 am
Edited on: July 7, 2011 9:38 am
 

Who we want to see on Hard Knocks '11

Hard Knocks (Getty).Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Throughout the lockout that seems neverending -- now at 114 days and counting!!! -- we’ve seen players get arrested, we’ve seen the NFL and the NFLPA come together and then bicker and then come together and then bicker, and we’ve seen players sue their girlfriends for their engagement rings.

Most disturbing, we’ve seen the signs that Brett Favre might want to return for another season.

We’ve also heard plenty about how a lost preseason would cost the NFL $800 million if the lockout continues through August and into September.

But when it comes to the preseason and how much is on the line, you know what we haven’t heard about? We haven’t heard which squad will be the subject of the annual highlight of August –- HBO’s "Hard Knocks."  

Oh, we know which teams have already declined the invitation (or supposedly, declined the invitation). Among them are the Buccaneers, the Broncos, the Lions and the Falcons (who might be open to doing it in the future), and at this point, it seems as if nobody wants to be on the show. Making matters tougher are those who say cooperating with Hard Knocks is a mistake.

Assuming we’ll see a preseason this year that would provide a platform for the Hard Knocks crew to start filming -- and CBSSports.coms’ Mike Freeman writes that it’s getting close --here are five teams we’d like to see featured on Hard Knocks. Many of them might not be interested for one reason or another, but if we have a fantasy roster, this is it.

Panthers


NewtonThe big storyline: Simply put: the entertainer and the icon, Cam Newton. We want to see how he learns the offense; we want to see if his teammates rally around him; we want to get an early idea of whether Carolina made a bad decision last April. Or maybe he’s the next superstar in the game. Either way, he’s one of the biggest storylines of the preseason, and we want to be inside the locker room to see what happens.

The foil: Jimmy Clausen. How is he going to react to Newton? What happens when Newton badly fakes out some defender destined for the practice squad and gains 30 yards on a broken play? Will the director then cut to Clausen as he raises a fist to the sky in anger? And what happens if Clausen, um, actually outplays Newton?

Two other compelling reasons: 1) NFL.com’s Gil Brandt has mentioned in the past couple of days that Favre has offered to help mentor Newton. Can you imagine the video that could come from this, especially if the camera caught Favre alone in the locker room sending a text message? 2) WR Steve Smith: is he going to play for the Panthers or not?

Patriots


The big storyline: The same guy who makes sure this show would never feature his team on his watch. That would be coach Bill Belichick. How fascinating would it be to see how Belichick builds a team and how he relates to his players? Would we get to see Belichick’s team meeting in which he implicitly tells his team how to answer questions from the media (in the most uninteresting way possible)? Kidding aside, we want to see a future Hall of Fame coach behind the scenes and uncensored.

The foil: Rex Ryan. Is there any way to get a split screen of the Jets coach talking trash about Belichick -- hey, he’s not here to kiss anybody’s ring! – while Belichick coldly goes about finding a way to make Ryan pay for his words?

Two other compelling reasons: 1) Danny Woodhead: he was on Hard Knocks with the Jets last season, and though he’s not in danger of being cut with New England, I still want to know why Woodhead, all of a sudden, is so freaking good. 2) G Logan Mankins (and his agent) has said some not very complimentary things about the Patriots management, all in the name of landing a large contract. Will he be kinder and gentler this preseason?

Packers


The big storyline: Obviously, the Lombardi Trophy. Hard Knocks has never followed a team the preseason after it won the Super Bowl, so it’d be cool to see the ring ceremony the public wasn’t allowed to witness a few weeks back (I’m assuming Hard Knocks wasn’t actually there, but it’d be cool nonetheless) while watching the Packers attempt a repeat.

The foil: Charles Woodson vs. Tramon Williams. Woodson is the bigger name, but he’s older than Williams and there’s a pretty good chance Williams is the better CB these days. Maybe we’d really get to see if Woodson is close to the end, and if Williams can replace Woodson’s outrageous production.

Two other compelling reasons: 1) Would Aaron Rodgers sign autographs for the fans at training camp? Because, as we all know, he doesn’t like signing for cancer patients (I kid, I kid). 2) Last year, little-used cornerback Brandon Underwood had a sexual assault charge hanging over his head all season (he pleaded no contest to a lesser charge). Now, he’s been charged with disorderly conduct after an alleged physical altercation with his soon-to-be ex-wife. Underwood isn’t a great quote, but his story might make for an interesting change of pace on the show.

PhillipsTexans


The big storyline: The will-they-or-won’t-they-fire-him as it relates to coach Gary Kubiak. I’m kind of surprised he’s still coaching in Houston actually, and the last time Hard Knocks featured this kind of storyline, it was Wade Phillips with the Cowboys. Now, Phillips is Kubiak’s defensive coordinator. How hot can that boiler room get anyway?

The foil: The secondary. This is what I wrote in the Texans offseason checkup: “The secondary (Kareem Jackson, Glover Quin, Bernard Pollard and Eugene Wilson) were just tremendously bad. If the Texans can’t get this fixed, it doesn’t matter who’s coordinating the defense, because Houston simply won’t win.” I don’t disagree with that.

Two other compelling reasons: 1) Though he came off a bit bumbling in Season 4 with the Cowboys, Phillips is a sympathetic figure. And the man has proved he can coordinate a defense. I want to see how he transforms a 4-3 sieve-like defense into a 3-4 defense that potentially could save Kubiak’s job. 2) Will QB Matt Schaub ever get into the playoffs? He’s the best quarterback in the league who hasn’t gotten there.

Raiders


The big storyline: Obviously, Al Davis, and the one question I want to know. How hands-on is he these days?

The foil: Nnamdi Asomugha: Just like Darrelle Revis last season with the Jets, we’re not going to see too much of the talented free agent cornerback on the TV. Unfortunately, we won’t get to see any of Antonio Cromartie either (psst, see video below).

Two other compelling reasons: 1) New coach Hue Jackson finally gets his chance at running a team. Forget that Tom Cable went 6-0 in the AFC West last year without making the playoffs -- still a pretty damn impressive feat. Davis got rid of him, just like he gets rid of everybody after a couple years. Will Jackson be an exception? 2) Al Davis: Seriously, I want as much Al Davis as possible.



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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com