Play Fantasy The Most Award Winning Fantasy game with real time scoring, top expert analysis, custom settings, and more. Play Now
 
Tag:Steve Spagnuolo
Posted on: October 29, 2011 6:09 pm
 

For the gambler in you, Week 8

Tebow

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Each Saturday, we’ll take the best -- and most clever -- odds collected by bodog.com for the upcoming week and give our take. This is important stuff, perhaps the most important post you’ll read all week. Because if you can’t lose money while watching a game in which you have absolutely no effect, what’s the point of watching sports at all?

FYI, Tim Tebow, a leader of men, had a big impact on Bodog’s business last week. For good and for bad. Said Richard Gardner, Bodog’s sportsbook manager: "With Tim Tebow playing for the Broncos we saw more action on the Denver this week than we have in a long time.  It will be interesting to see how the bettors treat the Broncos this week against the Lions since Detroit has also become a very publicly bet team this season.  Either way Tebow is good for the game and good for the book, even though he cost us a lot last week."

Just to remind you, last week I said you should go under on Tebow’s O/U of 175.5 passing yards and over on his O/U of 45.5 rushing yards. His totals from last week’s game in Miami: 161 passing and 59 rushing. Just pointing that out.

Will there be another game this regular season with no touchdowns scored? (Last week the Seahawks/Browns game had no touchdowns)     

Yes +115    

No -145    

Do the Browns and Seahawks play each other again? No? Good. I’ll go with No on this one.

Which coach will be fired or resign first?     
    
Jim Caldwell 2/3       

Ken Whisenhunt 2/1       

Steve Spagnuolo 3/1      

I love that they don’t put even put Tony Sparano’s name up there. Like the world would implode before he wasn’t fired by the end of this season; like there’s no reality in this world that Sparano will be employed after this year is finished. I don’t see Whisenhunt and Spagnuolo losing their jobs in the middle of the season, and I don’t really see Caldwell suffering that fate either. But it’s certainly not out of the realm of possibility, especially if the Colts are sitting at 0-12 and 0-13. So, go with Caldwell. Then, maybe Peyton Manning can become the head coach.

DeMarco Murray -- total rushing yards Week 8?  
        
Over/Under 85½

After the 253-yard ridiculousness he showed last week, Murray is bound to come back to earth this week. He’s also never gained more than 34 rushing yards in any other game during his short career. Although the Cowboys are playing the Eagles, ranked No. 23 in rush defense this year, I’d still go under with Murray.

Will Tim Tebow have another 4th quarter comeback when trailing by 13 or more points in the 2011 regular season?

Yes 10/1     

Obviously, he won’t. But I like the idea of taking the long odds. So, if I were putting money on it, I’d go with yes. Because, as we’ve all learned, anything with Tebow is possible.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.
Posted on: October 25, 2011 9:57 am
 

Coach Killers, Week 7: Carson Boller, everybody!

Coach Killers is your weekly look around the league at those performances, decisions and "Wait, what did he just do?!" moments that put the guy in charge squarely on the ol' hot seat. (Getty Images)

Posted by Ryan Wilson

Raiders quarterbacks (take your pick)
Remember Raiders head coach Hue Jackson in the days leading up to the Chargers game, joking about about drinking irish coffee before deciding on his quarterback? He was coy and evasive about whether Carson Palmer would start less than a week after Jackson swapped two first-rounders for him and save Oakland's season. Carson had spent the previous nine months on his couch refusing to play for the Bengals, and while the Raiders was a better situation for him (think about that for a moment), he didn't know the offense or his teammates, and would no doubt be rusty from having taken nearly a year off.

The QB changed, the results didn't (Getty Images)
So when the Raiders took the field Sunday, it was with backup Kyle Boller. Not ideal, but it's what you have to do given the circumstances. What you can't do, no matter how bad things get against a division rival: you absolutely can not bring Palmer in.

First, because, as we've established: HE'S NOT READY. Second, long-suffering Raiders fans have something this October that they haven't possessed in a decade: hope. (The Raiders entered Sunday's game with a 4-2 record. Since 2002, the last time they went to the Super Bowl, Oakland won four games or fewer for an entire season four times. And they haven't had a winning record since 2002.)  After gazing on Palmer in all his unmitigated awfulness, now that's been taken away from them, too.

Jackson panicked. Boller threw three first-half interceptions, the Raiders got down early, and Jackson, perhaps finally realizing that he had mortgaged Oakland's future, decided to get Palmer some work against a Chiefs team that suddenly looked like defending division champs.

Bad idea. Because when Palmer entered the game in the third quarter, he picked up right where Boller left off, tossing three interceptions of his own. And all the talk about the zip on his throws? He must've left that on the practice field, too, because our first glimpse at 2011 Palmer looked a lot like the 2010 Palmer that struggled with the Bengals.

Yes, we get it, that was his first game action since last season. But that's our point: don't even subject him, his fragile psyche and the fans' hopes and dreams to that in the first place. Not now. It's okay to lose convincingly with Boller. People expect it. But to throw Palmer in the mix and to have that happen … well, that's bad. Really, really, bad.

Not to worry, though.

"This football team is not going to blink," Jackson said after the game. "We've got to play better. We've got to play better offensively. I take full responsibility, because this is a team that I lead, and we didn't play like the Raiders can play."

Um, okay. It gets better (or worse, depending on your perspective).

"We knew they had a quarterback controversy," said the Chiefs' Kendrick Lewis, who pick-sixed Boller's first pass of the afternoon. "We studied film and studied their routes and knew they would have a limited playbook. When we had the opportunity to make big plays and capitalize, that's what we did."

No argument here.


The 4th interception of the day for the Kansas City defense was a pick six off of the newest member of the Oakland Raiders Carson Palmer.

Chargers' two-minute offense
San Diego scored 21 points in the first half against the Jets, and led New York for three and a half quarters. And then, when they needed to score a touchdown with just under two minutes to go, the offense showed all the urgency of a team trying to run out the clock. It was only slightly more inexplicable than the defense's decision to cover Plaxico Burress until he got into the red zone because quarterback Phil Rivers, one of the league's best quarterbacks, is supposed to excel in these late-game situations. Sunday, he did not.

A recap:

* 1:29 on the clock, ball on Chargers' 24-yard line. Rivers to Antonio Gates for 18 yards. Perfect start. We've seen this before, right?

* With no timeouts remaining, Rivers sashays up to the line of scrimmage like it's the first drive of the first quarter. Compounding matters: head coach Norv Turner appears to be in no rush to get the play call into Rivers. Twenty-nine seconds later, the Chargers finally snap the ball. Rivers, perhaps drawing inspiration from Tim Tebow, takes a deep drop before throwing a four-yard pass nowhere near the sidelines. Patrick Crayton makes the catch, the clock continues to run.

* Rivers liked the previous play so much, he runs it again, but only after 46 seconds have elapsed. Seriously.

* On third down, the ball is snapped with 17 seconds left in the game and the Chargers having gained a grand total of 25 yards. Thankfully, Rivers throws the ball a) downfield and b) to the sidelines. It falls incomplete. If nothing else, the clock stops.

* On fourth down, needing 51 yards and with just 11 seconds to do it, the Chargers will undoubtedly call a play that gets them a quick first down and then take one last chance in the end zone. Because, really, they're out of other options at this point, right? Turns out, not exactly. Rivers did something nobody expected: he throws the ball … out of bounds.  And we don't mean in a position near the sideline where only his receiver can make a play. We mean: over the bench, almost into the crowd.

So, yeah, that happened.

"Very disorganized," Tony Dungy said Sunday during NBC's Football Night in America. "You expect more Philip Rivers and that offense." Yes, yes you do, Tony.

Chargers tight end Randy McMichael agrees.

“We had them down and took our foot off the gas,” he said. “I’m not giving credit to anybody. This is our fault. Nothing to do with the play calling … Their secondary isn’t anything. It’s our fault. The guys in this locker room, we lost the game. The San Diego Chargers beat the San Diego Chargers. Nothing to do with the New York Jets. It’s embarrassing.”

Unfortunately, the San Diego Chargers don't get a win and a loss for beating themselves.

Jets cornerback (and former Coach Killers honoree!) Antonio Cromartie had a different take.

"When you're up by 11 points in the fourth quarter, and you can't even finish the game up, that shows what kind of team you are: a team that can't finish," Cromartie told The Newark Star-Ledger. "And that’s been San Diego the whole time. There it is."

And Rex Ryan's response when he was asked about McMichael's comments? "Stay classy, San Diego." We're not kidding.

Week 7 Recap

Kevin Kolb, quarterback, Arizona
You think the Cardinals regret a) trading a second-round pick and Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie for Kolb, and b) then giving Kolb a $62 million extension? Because we're almost positive Arizona could go 1-5 with pretty much any combination of Derek Anderson, Max Hall and John Skelton.

Against the Steelers, Kolb looked like … well, the same dude we saw behind Donovan McNabb in Philly. We were confused when the Cards gave up so much (and then paid so much) to get him in free agency since Kolb hadn't shown that he was anything other than a quality backup and spot starter.

Kolb threw an interception on Arizona's first possession, which led to seven Steelers' points, and he now has just as many TDs as picks (7) this season. He's also completing just 58 percent of his passes, and missing wide-open targets. On Sunday, he short-hopped a ball to tight end Rob Housler on what should've been a first-half touchdown, and the TD pass he did throw -- a 73-yarder to LaRod Stephens-Howling -- was a Tebow special: the ball traveled 10 yards and Stephens-Howling did the heavy lifting for the final 63 yards to the end zone.

As long as we're making comparisons, here's one more: through six games, Kolb is basically Kyle Boller with a permed mullet. This is not a compliment. (Upside: if there's ever a movie about his life, Danny McBride's getting the lead role, though Kenny Powers might have a better arm.)

Like he did in the team's previous loss, Whisenhunt vowed to examine what the Cards are doing and who's doing it. Clearly, Kolb is part of that examination, although there has been no discussion of replacing him. "I"m not saying that," Whisenhunt told the Arizona Republic's Kent Somers when he brought up the possibility. This is what happens when you pay guys $62 million and you're not really sure if they're going to pan out: you have to play them while you find out. Through six games, Kolb's struggling.

That said, he said after the Steelers loss that he felt he was making progress.

"When you have lost five games in a row, I don't think anybody is progressing at the rate we need," Whisenhunt said when apprised of Kolb's remarks.

"I think you're naïve if you say that. I'm not saying Kevin is naïve to say that. Kevin has made progress in some areas, but I think all know there have been some plays he's left out there."

We don't think Kevin's naive, either. Saying "I'm progressing!" is a coping mechanism.

Titans offense, defense
The biggest game of the season against a hated division rival and Tennessee decides to take the afternoon off. That sums up nicely what we can expect from this team the rest of the season. The Titans stumbled out of the gate losing to the Jags, then beat the Ravens in Week 2, got to 3-1 and then were smoked by the Steelers in Pittsburgh. Following their Week 6 bye, they came out wholly unprepared against a team they see twice a year every year, and following a 41-7 beatdown are now 3-3.

And there were no bright spots Sunday. Texans running back Arian Foster, not happy to just run all over the Titans, added an arial assault to the whipping. He had 115 receiving yards in the first half, including a 68-yard pitch and catch from Matt Schaub. By the time it was over, he had 119 yards receiving and another 115 rushing and three touchdowns.

“We got embarrassed in our own backyard. That’s the tough thing about it,” safety Michael Griffin said. “It can get worse. No team is going to look at us as a team that won three straight games. They’re going to look at us as a team that was 0-and-2 against good teams. We’ve got to turn this thing around.”

Luckily, Chris Johnson and his Amazing Disappearing Act, isn't to blame. At least according to Chris Johnson.

“Basically, if you are watching the game and you really can’t tell what is going on with the run game then I would say you really don’t know football,’’ Johnson said. “I wouldn’t say I am the issue. I am very confident I have been doing the things … I do.”

And in 2011, "doing the things I do" means rushing for 18 yards on 10 carries. Yes, Chris, keep doing that. It's a huge help.

Kyle Boller haunted the Ravens on MNF. (Getty Images)
Tie: Rams defense/Ravens offense
Lord have mercy on both these units. It's the unstoppable force and the immovable object having taken the shape of ridiculously bad football. The Rams, an admittedly dreadful team, got steamrolled by a Cowboys' run defense that, prior to Week 7, didn't exist. Remember: Dallas couldn't run the ball late in the game last week against the Pats' porous D. Against the Rams? It looked like Tony Dorsett and Emmitt Smith joined forces, hopped in a time machine, and went off.

Instead they just lived vicariously through rookie DeMarco Murray, Dallas' third-round pick. Murray's first touch of the game came on the Cowboys' first possession, on first and 19 from the Dallas nine-yard-line. Ninety-one yards later … touchdown. That set the tone for the rest of the afternoon. Murray, who saw extended action because Felix Jones was out with an injury, rushed 25 times for 253 (TWO-HUNDRED FIFTY-THREE!) yards.

Jeff Gordon's Rams Report Card in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch is … well, about what you'd expect: Defensive line - F, linebackers - F, secondary - D-minus (woo hoo! passing!).

Head coach Steve Spagnuolo got an "F" too. "Spagnuolo was supposed to build this team from the lines out . . . and yet the Rams keep getting manhandled in the trenches, despite heavy investments there. Overall sloppiness remains pervasive six games into this winless season. … The death march continued."

And that's about the best thing you can say about the 2011 Rams.

The Ravens, meanwhile, entered Monday night's game as one of the best teams in the AFC, with their always-stout defense and a young offense that was supposedly improving. Other than the Week 1 hurting they put on the Steelers (which included seven Pittsburgh turnovers and great field position for Baltimore's offense), and the hapless Rams, the Ravens' offense looks to be right out of the era prior to the invention of the forward pass.

And that's fine if offensive coordinator Cam Cameron is feeding the ball to Ray Rice, easily the team's best weapon. But against the Jags, Rice fumbled early and ended up spending much of the evening on the bench. Predictably, Baltimore's offense faltered. (By the way, if Joe Flacco was benched every time he had a turnover he'd be on the practice squad by now.)

By the time it was over, Rice had eight carries for the night. In related news: the Ravens scored seven points, and that came on the next-to-last drive. Ironically: Flacco threw one of the worst interceptions you'll ever see on the last drive, sealing the win for the Jags.

“It's about as bad as you can play on offense,” Ravens coach John Harbaugh said afterwards. “I don't know if we could play any worse than that until that [late] drive."

You can't. We checked. The Ravens didn't get their first first down until the third quarter.

“If we don't get the consistency on offense, we're not going anywhere," Harbaugh continued. "You can't play like we played tonight on offense and expect to win. We all know it. We got our butts handed to us from that sense, and we'll go back to work just like we always do.”

Linebacker Terrell Suggs, like everybody else, has no idea what the offense was doing.

"I don't really know what the game plan was," he told CBSSports.com's Pete Prisco after the game. "When I have a Pro Bowl running back, and he's not getting his touches, I'm going to feel some kind of way about it. He wants the ball. And I think we should feed him. Ray Rice is a phenomenal player. You have to use your phenomenal players. I have to question how many touches Anquan [Boldin] had. We've got guys on this team that can do some great things. We have to use those guys. It's that simple."

And this is why the torch-and-pitchfork crowd will be mobilizing this week and calling for Cameron to be fired (it's a weekly occurrence, but the cries should be especially loud this week after losing to the previously 1-5 Jaguars).


Maurice Jones-Drew ran for 105 yards against the NFL's best run defense, Josh Scobee kicked four field goals and the Jaguars snapped a five-game slide with a 12-7 victory over the Ravens on Monday night.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter, subscribe to our NFL newsletter, and while you're at it, add our RSS Feed.
Posted on: October 18, 2011 1:46 pm
 

Mike Sims-Walker headed back to Jaguars

Posted by Will Brinson

Mike Sims-Walker's headed back to the Jaguars, after being cut by the Jaguars, signed by the Rams and cut by the Rams. Get excited, Duval County!

This is based on Sims-Walker's Twitter feed, which features a pair of messages that strongly indicate he'll be returning to Jacksonville.

For starters, Sims-Walker kicked the day off with a "And the phone calls begin ..." tweet, indicating that his agent was getting calls about where he could end up playing.

Shortly thereafter, MSW shouted (the typing version anyway), "Duuuvvvvvaaaallllllllllll!!!!!!!!!!!!" For those that don't know, Duval County's the home of Jacksonville (see above).

And when asked by a follower if it was a "Mike [Thomas] and Mike [Sims-Walker] sequel," the wideout tweeted "on the way!"

Sims-Walker became extraneous for the Rams when he failed to produce and they managed to swing a trade with Denver to acquire Brandon Lloyd on Monday.

The ex-Jaguar was a healthy scratch in Week 6, indicating exactly how unhappy coach Steve Spagnuolo and offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels was with his production in St. Louis.

And while Sims-Walker won't exactly turn around the Jaguars season, he'll at least provide some experience at wide receiver that should help rookie Blaine Gabbert.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter, subscribe to our NFL newsletter, and while you're add it, add our RSS Feed.
Posted on: September 21, 2011 11:16 am
Edited on: September 21, 2011 11:47 am
 

Rams to file complaint against Giants for faking

Posted by Will Brinson



On Monday night, Giants defenders Deon Grant and Jacquian Williams did their best hit-by-a-bowling-ball impersonation in order to slow down Sam Bradford and the Rams offense as they ran roughshod over New York with their no-huddle offense.

Everyone who watched the game -- whether you were there like Mike Freeman or just checking out the acting on television like me -- believed the Giants were faking the injuries. The Rams obviously feel the same way, and are going to file a complaint with the NFL office.

"That'll go on the list of things we're going to send in," coach Steve Spagnuolo said. "I think the league is looking into it. I'll let it run its course from that point of view."

NFL VP of Communications Greg Aiello recently said said that teams could face punishments for faking, but only if said faking could be proved.

"The Competition Committee deprecates feigning injuries, with subsequent withdrawal, to obtain a timeout without penalty," Aiello said in an email to Freeman. "Coaches are urged to cooperate in discouraging this practice. If a player or club admits to it, the action would be subject to discipline."

Unless, you now, there's actually audio of what Bradford claims to have heard before the "injuries."

"They couldn't get subbed, they couldn't line up," Bradford said. "Someone said, 'Someone go down, someone go down,' so someone just went down and grabbed a cramp."

One would think, given the way the NFL meticulously catalogues the action on the field for NFL Films, and given that this was a primetime game, that if a Giants player yelled "someone go down" it would be pretty easy to prove.

As noted several times over the past two days, there's nothing new about faking injuries in football. But that doesn't mean the league should just stand by and wait to until something happens in a key situation to alter the outcome of a game before changing the rules.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.
Posted on: September 19, 2011 11:20 am
 

Spagnuolo: Steven Jackson a 'tough call' Monday

Posted by Will Brinson


Steven Jackson was one of roughly 347* Rams to suffer an injury last Sunday in their loss to Philadelphia. And given the nature -- a strained quad/hammy -- of the injury, it's seems like Jackson's all but guaranteed to be out for Monday night's game.

Not so fast though -- Rams coach Steve Spagnuolo said that there's a chance Jackson could play Monday and that the team rested him all week for that specific possibility.

"We knew the only shot he had was to rest it all the way through," Spagnuolo told Albert Breer of the NFL Network. "It’ll be a tough call."

Jackson still looks like a bad bet to play against the Giants on Monday night -- if he struggles at all in the pregame workout, there's little chance the Rams will roll him out.

And they've got Cadillac Williams in the proverbial garage, so it's not as if there's absolutely demanding need to have Jackson on the field. Clearly, they'd rather have their top running back available for the game -- the Giants are vulnerable defensively, and a healthy S-Jax is a difference-maker on Monday night.

But the Rams would be wise to heed the lesson the Texans learned on Sunday: the NFL season is a grind, and bringing back your star running back too early is a sure-fire recipe for losing him for a longer period of time.

*All numbers approximate

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.
Posted on: September 13, 2011 4:26 pm
 

Rams CB Ron Bartell confirms season is over

"My goal is to play again," Rams cornerback Ron Bartell said. "I'm fully prepared to play again. I'm approaching it as such that I will play again." (US PRESSWIRE)
Posted by Ryan Wilson

It took just 60 minutes, plenty of sloppy football and a season's worth of injuries to dash the hopes of a promising 2011 campaign for the Rams, who missed the playoffs and the NFC West Division title by just one game a year ago. In their Week 1 matchup against the Eagles, St. Louis didn't just lose on the scoreboard. Gone for the season are wide receiver Danny Amendola and Tuesday cornerback Ron Bartell joined him on injured reserve after suffering a fractured bone in his lower neck.

"My goal is to play again," he told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch Tuesday. "I'm fully prepared to play again. I'm approaching it as such that I will play again." Bartell added: "There's absolutely no way I could come back and play this year. It takes time just for the bone to heal."

In addition to Amendola and Bartell, running back Steven Jackson could missed the Monday night game against the Giants with a quadriceps injury, franchise quarterback Sam Bradford bruised his right index finger (good news: he plans to play this week), and according so the Associated Press, cornerback Bradley Fletcher has a sprained toe that might limit him, and offensive tackle Jason Smith has a sprained left ankle. The team had feared Smith, the second overall pick of the 2009 draft, had a high ankle sprain which would have sidelined him for as long as a month.

"There's a lot there, no question," Spagnuolo said Monday. "Nobody's going to bury their head in the sand, and we're not going to go away. We didn't envision beginning like that and we certainly didn't envision losing all these guys. …

The Post-Dispatch's Bernie Miklasz echoes Spagnuolo's sentiments, writing that injuries aren't an excuse.

"Only one game into the season, and the Rams are hurting. And it's a shame. By now you're aware of the injuries suffered in the 31-13 loss to the Eagles. It's a long list. But it's important to recognize something: it's OK to feel sorry for the Rams, but no one else will. Not their opponents, not the fans of other teams, not the rivals in the NFC West, not the coaches who are studying video to find ways to attack the Rams' new weaknesses. And the injury excuse won't hold up."

Exactly. Good teams find a way to win with backups, and if the Rams want to get back to the postseason, that's what they'll have to do. First up: seeing what veteran cornerback Al Harris has left in the tank because he'll see a lot more playing time now that Bartell is on the shelf for the year.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.
Posted on: September 12, 2011 3:44 pm
 

Rams RB Steven Jackson likely to miss Week 2

Posted by Will Brinson

Earlier today, we noted that the injuries to the Rams were one of the bigger storylines from Week 1. Not only did Sam Bradford suffer a finger injury in the loss to Philadelphia, but wideout Danny Amendola will miss several weeks or more with a dislocated elbow and running back Steven Jackson injured his quad on an early 47-yard touchdown scamper.

X-rays on Bradford's finger came back negative, so that's good news -- but coach Steve Spagnuolo said on Monday that he doesn't expect Jackson to suit up for the Rams on Monday night against the Giants because of the quad injury.

"Bradford's right index finger is bruised," Spagnuolo said, via the Rams official Twitter account. "He'll be monitored this week but no nerve damage, nothing broken."

That was the "good" news. The bad news involves Jackson.

"Jackson does have a strained quadriceps," Spagnuolo said. "He's likely out this week but will be watched on a day to day basis."

If Jackson is indeed forced to miss the Monday night game against the Giants, the newly acquired Cadillac Williams will get most of the run for St. Louis. Caddy was actually pretty impressive against the Eagles, piling up 140 total yards on Sunday (91 rushing, 49 receiving) and given how badly the Giants defense looked against the Redskins, could conceivably be in line for a big game.

Right tackle Jason Smith also suffered an ankle sprain, but the Rams said it's not of the "high variety" which means that Smith could still suit up for St. Louis on Sunday.

All-in-all, the news has to be considered somewhat positive for St. Louis -- the number of injuries they suffered on Sunday offered the possibility to derail their season and now it looks like things are at least a little less ominous than they were 24 hours ago.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed.
Posted on: March 31, 2011 11:25 pm
 

Fired equipment manager talks about Spagnuolo

Posted by Andy Benoit

Remember the story about the Rams longtime equipment manager getting fired? The guy’s name was (and still is) Todd Hewitt. Todd Hewitt was (and, apparently, still is) not happy about the way new head coach Steve Spagnuolo treated him.

Hewitt, who in January was canned after 43 years with the Rams, recently visited with Jim Thomas of the St. Louis Post Dispatch. After three months, Hewitt’s still looking for a new job (he has a couple of prospects but nothing firm). He spoke very transparently about his firing from the Rams.

"There's two reasons equipment managers lose their jobs," he said. "They want to retire or they really screw up. I didn't want to retire and I didn't screw up. Even the head coach told me when he fired me, ‘Well, you didn't screw up. We're just going to go in a different direction.' "

After the ’09 season Spagnuolo told Hewitt he was on the fence about him. He kept him around in ’10 but fired him shortly after the season.

"(Spagnuolo) is a hard person to deal with," Hewitt said. "He's just very hands-on. Controlling. It's an ‘everything has to go through him’ kind of deal."

Hewitt says the head coach took issue with him sitting on the bench late in the fourth quarter of the team’s 18-17 loss to the Bucs (Steven Jackson had asked Hewitt to sit beside him for a minute). Spagnuolo also required Hewitt to get approval before assigning jersey numbers.

Since his firing, Hewitt has heard from several current and former Rams players. Jacob Bell, James Laurinaitis and David Vobora even invited him to come along on a trip to Mexico. (Hewitt graciously declined.)

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter and subscribe to our RSS Feed .

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com