Tag:Vincent Jackson
Posted on: July 19, 2011 10:08 am
Edited on: July 19, 2011 10:53 am
 

Mankins, Jackson will seek $10m in compensation?



Posted by Ryan Wilson

Players from several teams may have gotten word that they will be reporting for work this weekend, but there are still several things to iron out before there's a new collective bargaining agreement in place and the 2011 season can officially begin. One issue will be finding a compromise with the 10 plaintiffs named in the Brady v. the NFL lawsuit.

Yahoo! Sports' Jason Cole has learned through multiple sources that agents for two of the plaintiffs, Chargers wide receiver Vincent Jackson and Patriots guard Logan Mankins, "have requested that their players either become unrestricted free agents when the lockout is over or that they receive $10 million each as part of the settlement."

Jackson and Mankins missed much of the 2010 season when they couldn't reach long-term deals with their respective teams, before eventually reporting and playing out the remainder of the year. At the time, the players were hoping to become unrestricted free agents in 2011, but both were designated franchise players in February. 

According to an ESPN story last October, "Jackson and Mankins were among the players caught in significant changes because of an uncapped year that moved unrestricted free agency from four years to six years. Jackson and Mankins became part of a large class of restricted free agents when their contracts expired after their fifth season (2009). Both declined to sign their restricted free agent contract tenders, a requirement before players can report to their teams."

Per one Cole source, two other plaintiffs, Peyton Manning and Drew Brees, "don’t really have that much to gain [by seeking compensation] because they’re both quarterbacks … They pretty much have all the leverage they could want. But I think some other guys are going to expect to be compensated.” Manning and Brees also signed a joint statement with Tom Brady last week calling for a settlement.

Cole also explains why the six remaining plaintiffs are in no position to demand "drastic compensation for damages."
Linebacker Ben Leber and defensive end Brian Robison could get some compensation because they are free agents who have been unable to sign with teams, but that figures to be minimal. New York Giants defensive end Osi Umenyiora and Brady are under contract already. Denver Broncos rookie linebacker Von Miller has yet to sign a deal and linebacker Mike Vrabel has retired.
Which brings us back to Jackson and Mankins. Neither player's agent would comment on the matter but Cole writes that "Both agents have been involved in bitter disputes with the teams over the past two years. Jackson and Mankins were among a group of players who have had to wait six years to reach unrestricted free agency because of previous rules."

And an NFL Players Association source tells Cole: “They’re asking for something they believe – and I think most people would believe – is fair compensation for what they’ve had to go through. My guess would be that the owners or the league will pay them.”

Cole adds that the league will consider all its options in the matter but that it "might be more inclined to pay Jackson and Mankins because removing the franchise tag would set a precedent for Manning to ask for the same thing now and Brees to do so next year if he doesn’t get a new contract from the New Orleans Saints."

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Posted on: July 1, 2011 11:26 am
Edited on: July 1, 2011 4:12 pm
 

Chargers GM talks Eli Manning-Philip Rivers trade

Posted by Ryan Wilson

Chargers general manager AJ Smith is known as much for his ability to identify talent and assemble a roster as he is for his sometimes stubborn disposition.

He refused to give wide receiver Vincent Jackson a new contract last offseason, and Jackson ended up holding out for the first two months of the season. When Jackson finally returned in Week 12 (he had to first serve a three-game suspension for violating the league's personal conduct policy), it was without a new contract but the Chargers were 6-5. They would eventually miss the playoffs, and although most of that was because of their dreadful defense special teams, Jackson's absence certainly didn't help.

(Edit: the commenters rightly point out that it was special teams -- not the defense -- that cost the Chargers a shot at the playoffs last season. My brain was thinking "special teams" but my fingers typed "defense." To hammer home the point, Football Outsiders ranked San Diego offense fourth, their defense seventh, and special teams ... 32nd.)

In 2005, Smith placed Pro Bowl tight end Antonio Gates on the "roster exempt" list for the season opener against the Cowboys because Gates wouldn't sign his one-year exclusive rights free-agent offer of $380,000. The two sides eventually came to a resolution but not before San Diego lost to Dallas. The most famous example of Smith vs. uncooperative Chargers player came the year before, when the team selected Eli Manning with the first-overall pick of the 2004 draft even though Manning said he'd rather sit out the season than play in San Diego.

Smith, undeterred, drafted Manning anyway. About an hour after Manning stood on stage with that "Did this really just happen?" look on his face while holding a Chargers jersey, Smith traded him to the Giants for Philip Rivers, and draft picks that would later become Shawne Merriman, Nate Kaeding and Roman Oben.

Despite the Chargers getting the most out of that trade, all most people remember is that Manning and the Giants won a Super Bowl in 2007. In a recent interview with Sporting News, Smith talked about Rivers and Manning. 

"I believe with my heart and soul that [Rivers] one day will lead the Chargers to a world championship," Smith said. “He’s a great quarterback—a phenomenal leader with great character, great work habits.”

No one disputes that. In fact, Football Outsiders ranked Rivers as the NFL's third-best quarterback in 2010, behind Tom Brady and Peyton Manning. Eli ranked 16th, behind Carson Palmer, Joe Flacco, Kyle Orton and Matt Cassel. If nothing else, it reinforces the importance of surrounding your franchise quarterback with playmakers at the skill position and a good defense.

As for how Smith feels about Manning seven years after drafting him … well, let's just say he's still a little bitter. "He was a Charger for 45 minutes and that was too much time to be a Charger, in my opinion."

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Posted on: June 27, 2011 10:27 pm
 

Report: Manning, Brees pushing for no tags

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Like Reggie White once discovered, maybe there is something extra special waiting for the players whose names are attached to the Brady v NFL lawsuit that’s winding its way through the court system. A nice little perk that could make them extra money for the rest of their careers.

According to Pro Football Talk sources, the agency that represents Peyton Manning and Drew Brees is pushing for both players to be exempt from the franchise tag for any team who would want to place it on them. 

It’s not out of the realm of possibility, considering White, whose name was on the 1993 lawsuit against the NFL, won a franchise tag-free existence after that legal dispute was settled.

Manning, who’s currently the Colts franchise tag for 2011, would almost certainly receive an astronomical new contract from Indianapolis if this were to happen, and Brees -- entering the final year of his contract with the Saints -- would most likely benefit as well.

PFT also writes that other players on the suit - specifically Chargers WR Vincent Jackson, Patriots G Logan Mankins and Broncos rookie LB Von Miller -- also could receive the same kind of reward.

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Posted on: April 3, 2011 2:34 pm
 

Offseason Checkup: San Diego Chargers

Posted by Will Brinson

 

Eye on Football's playing doctor for every NFL team with our Offseason Check-ups.



2010 was a weird year for the San Diego Chargers. They had all the tools necessary to contend for a Super Bowl, and in a season when parity reigned supreme, that should have equated with success. It didn't, though, because the San Diego got off to one of its patented slow starts, performed epically horrible on special teams, and couldn't close out inferior teams.

Statistically, though, it was all there. Philip Rivers was a machine on offense, piling up big stats despite throwing to guys like Legadu Naanee, Patrick Crayton, Randy McMichael and Seyi Ajirotutu. Part of what got those A-listers on the top of the Bolts' receiving stats was injuries (well, most was injuries), and part was the holdout of Vincent Jackson. Oh yes, and Mike Tolbert -- just like everyone expected -- was the team's leading rusher.

Defensively, San Diego thrived despite not having an elite pass-rushing presence. In fact, just like on offense, they were the No. 1-ranked team in the league. And yet, again, no playoffs. It's a really odd conundrum, frankly, and it's either a really weird fluke or it's indicative of a bigger problem within the organization. Given the Chargers' typically annual success, the jury's still out on the latter, but another slow start and sloppy manner of missing the playoffs could change that in 2011.



Special Teams, Depth

It's not all that hard to pinpoint the problems for the Chargers in 2010. Pretty clearly, special teams cost them a couple of wins and therefore a shot at the postseason (plus, likely a divisional title). 

Of course, fixing special teams is much easier than, say, fixing a giant hole at quarterback, and it's entirely possible that with the right personnel moves, the Chargers will be fine in that area in 2011. In fact, once some veterans were plugged into the special teams unit, San Diego was much better at the third leg of football than it was earlier in the year. (At that point, though, it was just too late.) 

Perhaps the bigger problem for the Chargers in 2011 will be the status of certain players. Vincent Jackson was franchised, but depending on how the CBA shakes out, he could be gone. It seems somewhat reasonable that he's around for one more year. Malcolm Floyd could be out the door as well, meaning the Chargers' depth at wide receiver could be crushed back to late-last-year levels. If Kevin Burnett, Stephen Cooper, Eric Weddle, Jacques Cesaire, Travis Johnson leave, the defense is going to take a hit too. It's part of the problem with the way A.J. Smith built the team -- if the labor negotiations don't favor the league, San Diego's depth suffers.



1. Defensive End
As might have been said 5,000 times in these previews thus far, it's a pretty good year to need depth at defensive line. So it wouldn't be surprising at all to see the Chargers nab a defensive end with their first-round pick. J.J. Watt, Cameron Jordan and Adrian Clayborn are all highly likely/possible picks for San Diego at No. 18.

2. Linebacker
Shaun Phillips had a monster year in 2010, but San Diego needs to beef up their linebacking corps, unless they actually think that Larry English can end up performing to his first-round expectations. (And, speaking of which, not exactly a great last pair of years in the first round for A.J. Smith, huh? Ryan Mathews and Larry English aren't exactly justifying their top-20 status.) English could still justify the selection, but there's some serious talent that would fit San Diego's scheme in guys like Robert Quinn, Akeem Ayers and Ryan Kerrigan, the latter two of whom should fall to 18 pretty easily. Quinn's a guy that would be a steal at 18 and could also be a trade-up target for Smith if hops up the board again in 2011.

3. Wide Receiver
Talk about an up-in-the-air position for the Bolts: if Jackson and Floyd end up leaving, they're going to need some serious help here. Buster Davis isn't going to pan out and while Antonio Gates should technically qualify as "depth" at wideout, having Naanee and Ajirotutu as the top receiving options just isn't going to cut it. Smith and Norv Turner know they can have success with less than elite talent, though, so seeing them take a wideout with an early pick would be a bit surprising.



Look, the Chargers are capable of winning it all in 2011. Statistics don't mean everything (obviously), but if a team is the top offensive AND defensive team, it means there's enough talent on the roster to bring home the Lombardi Trophy. Living up to the lofty expectations this franchise has set for the past few years in 2011 will require two things: not making simple mistakes and actually remembering that football starts in September.

It would help, too, for the Bolts to address some of their defensive needs as well. And for their last two first-rounders -- English and Mathews -- to play up to their potential. Should all of that happen in 2011 and the Chargers don't win the division and/or at least make a run to the playoffs, it's entirely possible that Norv Turner's job could be on the line once again. At this point, there's no viable reason for a team with this much success -- statistically speaking -- not to be converting their high-end performance into more wins.

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Posted on: March 11, 2011 6:04 pm
Edited on: March 11, 2011 7:23 pm
 

Nine players file lawsuit against league

Posted by Andy Benoit
D. Brees (US Presswire)
The NFLPA decertification has taken place, and the aftermath is already underway. 

Superstars Peyton Manning, Tom Brady and Drew Brees are among nine plaintiffs who have filed antitrust claims against the NFL in the 8th Circuit Court. The other plaintiffs are Giants DE Osi Umenyiora, Chargers WR Vincent Jackson, Pariots G Logan Mankins, Chiefs LB Mike Vrabel, Vikings LB Ben Leber and Vikings DE Brian Robison. Also, among the players is Texas A & M first-round rookie prospect Von Miller, who is representing the rookies. (Nice -- and gutsy -- way to introduce yourself to the league.)

The players allege that the NFL conspired to deny the players' ability to market their services. This has been the players' silver bullet all along. After the American Needle vs. NFL case in May determined that the NFL consists of 32 separate entities, the league became vulnerable to antitrust laws. Separate entities cannot bind together to prevent players from working.

Expect the league to file a counter suit claiming that the NFLPA’s decertification is a sham. Per the terms of the Collective Bargaining Agreement, the NFLPA could only sue the league after decertifying.

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Posted on: February 19, 2011 1:29 pm
Edited on: February 19, 2011 1:29 pm
 

Sound like A.J. Smith won't negotiate with V-Jax

Posted by Andy Benoit

Thanks to his lengthy holdout (and ensuing three-game suspension) Vincent Jackson did not catch a pass for the 2010 Chargers until Week 14. Overall, San Diego’s offense was still prolific despite the absence of its most lethal vertical playmaker. But nevertheless, the 28-year-old Jackson is key to the Chargers’ aerial attack moving forward.
V. Jackson (US Presswire)
Hence, general manager A.J. Smith slapped Jackson with the team’s 2011 franchise tag. The tag delivers Jackson a one-year deal that guarantees upwards of $10 million. That’s roughly $7 million more than the initial RFA tender he was stuck with last season.

But if Jackson still wants a long-term contract with a fat signing bonus up front (and we’ll assume he does), he’ll have to wait. Again.

“Vincent’s a good player and he’s always been a good player, which I’ve said repeatedly,” Smith told Nick Canepa of the San Diego Union-Tribune. “I’m comfortable with not giving him a long-term deal right now and we are not negotiating a long-term deal. We’ll see how the year goes, but not at the present time.”

As Jackson learned last year, when Smith says he’s not negotiating, he’s not negotiating. So why this position for the curmudgeonly GM?

Smith could be keeping Jackson in a one-year deal because he doesn’t trust the receiver’s off-field maturity (Jackson has had multiple DUI arrests in his career). Or, more likely, he could be thinking that with a quarterback like Philip Rivers, wide receivers are more dispensable. This in mind, don’t be surprised if the Chargers draft a wideout in one of the early rounds this April.

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Posted on: February 15, 2011 1:53 pm
 

Vincent Jackson gets franchised by Chargers

Posted by Will Brinson

The franchise tags are just rolling in these days -- and you should keep up with our helpful Franchise Tag Tracker -- and Vincent Jackson's the latest guy told, "You're it."

The Chargers announced on Tuesday afternoon that they were designating the non-exclusive franchise tag.

"Vincent has been a valuable contributor to our team," said general manager A.J. Smith. "We want him to be a Charger."

People will probably think this is a disaster in the making because of Jackson's relationship with Smith, but it's not as bad as one might guess. After all, Jackson will now make north of $10 million a year just for 2011 (if it's played), and still has a chance to land a multi-year deal.

It's unlikely, but if someone offers Jackson another offer, the Chargers can either match the deal or receive two first-rounders in return.

Jackson's talented, but it would be surprising to see someone cough up a ton of money and the picks for him, particularly with the current labor strife (he can't be signed anyway right now and probably won't sign his franchise tag).

Then there's the uncertainty of the franchise tag surviving a new labor deal -- if it doesn't, that clearly changes things. If it does, Jackson can either work out a long-term deal with the Bolts or play one more season at $10 million in a high-octane offense and assume at some point the Chargers will stop paying him huge money for one-year deals.

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Posted on: February 10, 2011 11:59 pm
 

Franchise tag updates

Posted by Andy Benoit

While it’s still being debated whether NFL teams can use the franchise tag (the Union is saying “Go ahead – just know, it won’t mean anything”), reports started trickling out on Thursday about WHO will draw the tags.

Not surprisingly, the Colts are said to be ready to slap Manning with a $23 million tag if they’re unable to reach a long-term deal.

According to Ian Rapoport of the Boston Herald, the Patriots will franchise guard Logan Mankins. (That should go over well – Mankins, unable to come to a long-term deal with the club last season, held out seven games).

Speaking of holdouts, earlier in the day we mentioned in Hot Routes that the Chargers might be willing to pay the $10 million it would cost to franchise tag Vincent Jackson. And the Raiders are going to tag either tight end Zach Miller or defensive lineman Richard Seymour.

All this depending, of course, on whether there even is a franchise tag.

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