Tag:Cincinnati Bengals
Posted on: June 21, 2010 5:40 pm
 

Dillon charged with two misdemeanors

Former NFL RB Corey Dillon – a four-time Pro Bowler who amassed more than 11,000 rushing yards in 10 seasons with the Bengals and the Patriots – has been charged with two misdemeanors pertaining to his April arrest on the suspicion of drunk driving.

As the L.A. Times writes , Dillon later was arrested on suspicion of domestic violence, though he was never actually charged. Here’s what the Times wrote about that incident:

Dillon and his wife were arguing over their pending divorce and child custody when she called 911, saying she had been assaulted by her husband, according to a spokeswoman for the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department.

(Desiree) Antoine-Dillon alleged that Dillon "poured milk over her head, threw water on her and poured soy sauce on her" during the dispute, according to the filing rejection released Thursday. She also told authorities she suffered "a superficial cut on her thumb."

She later told authorities that her husband never hit her and her injury was not caused by physical contact with Dillon.


In another sign that Dillon might not have been the greatest dude in the world, here’s a story from his playing days. One day, a well-respected, well-established TV sports anchor approached Dillon from behind as he sat on his stool in the locker room.

“Hey Corey,” the newsman asked. “Do you have a minute to talk to us?”

Dillon, without saying a word, raised both arms and flipped him the double-bird.

Said the newsman: “I guess that means ‘no.’”


--Josh Katzowitz

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter.



Posted on: June 21, 2010 12:00 pm
 

Cedric Benson Wants a New Contract

Cedric Benson clearly outplayed the two-year, $7 million contract he signed last season. Benson, who is set to become a free agent after the 2010 season, has approached the Bengals about a new deal. The Bengals are interested in talking, but no firm timeframe has been set. Benson is coming off the best year of his career, having rushed for 1,251 yards and six touchdowns in 13 games. He has shown the burst and powerful fluidity that once made him a high first-round pick in Chicago. His patient running style is perfect for Cincy’s new ground-oriented offense.

One might think Benson is better off just playing out his contract and becoming a free agent. But given the tenuous status of the 2011 season, and the fact that Benson is already 27 years old, now is probably the most opportune time for Benson to get paid. But don’t expect a holdout if the Bengals drag their feet on this one.

--Andy Benoit

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter

Category: NFL
Posted on: June 18, 2010 1:26 pm
 

Woodson tries his hand at coaching

CINCINNATI – Rod Woodson is one of the greatest defensive backs in NFL history. He’s an 11-time Pro Bowler – at three different positions, mind you – and he was All-Pro as a CB and a FS. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame last year on the strength of 71 career interceptions – including eight for Oakland when he was 37 years old.

But as great as he was, he found himself this week starting on the bottom rung of the coaching ladder. He was fitted with unfamiliar clothes, and though he received instant respect from anybody that walked within 15 feet of him, he’s a coaching intern and he knows he’s the lowest of the low.

“It doesn’t bother me,” he told CBSSports.com this week. “You have to start somewhere. I came in the league as a rookie, and you were frowned upon as a rookie. I had to work my way up. Hard work for me isn’t a problem. I know a lot of football, but it’s a process of learning how to coach. The players are going to take what they want to take from you. They won’t take everything. As a coach, you have to realize that.”

Woodson spoke with Bengals coach Marvin Lewis in January, and despite working as an analyst for the NFL Network and the Big Ten Network, he said he was ready to give coaching a try. The internship, which began this week for mini-camp and will continue through training camp in July and August, was a way for him to test the waters.

“I’ve got five kids, and I know the commitment coaches have to make,” said Woodson, whose oldest is a sophomore in college and whose youngest is 10. “That’s a deterrent at times. But for me to impact the young players’ lives outside of football is huge. You don’t have to be an ex-player to be a good coach, but I like to see a lot of ex-players come back that can give something to the players outside of football.”

Already, the former Pittsburgh Steelers great is making an impact on the players he’s now coaching.

“You immediately give that guy respect no matter what, just because of his production,” said SS Chinedum Ndukwe. “You can tell in the meeting rooms – he’ll break stuff down for us. He understands the game, and he still knows it. I think he still has the itch. I think if he could still play, he would do it.”

Secondary coach Kevin Coyle introduced his players to Woodson by showing them his stats during a DBs meeting. Immediately, Woodson, though he admitted it was strange to wear Bengals gear, immersed himself into the team.

“Can he be a coach of guys who don’t take it as seriously as he did? Because he took it very seriously,” Lewis said. “That’s the fun part of it. It didn’t take long for him to start coaching out there. He has so much to offer. His notes were like an encyclopedia. He’ll teach people how to learn.”

Woodson’s philosophy is to be a conduit between the players and the coaches.

“Trying to slow the game down and put it in layman’s terms when the coaches are speaking,” Woodson said. “When the coaches say one thing, players think another. Sometimes you have to try to find an even keel. Hopefully, I can try to bridge that gap. I think I’ve been out of the game long enough to know what the coaches really want. I’m trying to tell them what it took for me to get to the next level. That doesn’t really change over the years.”

First, though, Woodson will have to decide if coaching is a vocation he really wants to pursue.

“The only way to do it is to do it,” Lewis said. “He’s going to commit himself to do it. Only thing he can experience is training camp and this. He’ll know. He’ll have a great idea of it.”


--Josh Katzowitz

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter.





Posted on: June 18, 2010 9:22 am
Edited on: June 18, 2010 9:36 am
 

More on the expanded schedule

Similar to our interview Thursday with Bengals LT (and NFLPA player rep) Andrew Whitworth – who is rather cool to the idea of an expanded 18-game regular-season schedule unless the players receive increased health care or decreased contact during practices – CBSSports.com senior writer Clark Judge spoke to some New York Giants players Thursday to get their opinions.

Not surprisingly, their thoughts weren’t much different than Whitworth’s.

A sampling of quotes. One from DE Justin Tuck: "You're going to have a lot of disgruntled players if this happens. I don't see how it benefits the NFL. I think it's going to cause more problems than solutions."

And one from C Shaun O’Hara: "It's hard enough to get through 16 (games), and that's our No. 1 concern -- the injury factor. I think everybody knows the injury rate in the NFL is 100 percent. There isn't a player who hasn't been injured. It's not a matter of 'if.' It's a matter of 'when.' So if you tell the players that you're going to increase their opportunities for injury, of course, we're all very hesitant to commit to that."

Even if a change like this doesn’t make sense for the players, it’s not hard to see that this adjustment will be made – perhaps as early as the 2012 season. Yeah, it might suck for the players, who will end up getting concessions from the owners because of the change, while causing more injuries and shortening careers. But it’s a win-win for the fans and the game in general. No matter Tuck’s opinion, an expanded schedule does benefit the game, and that’s probably enough to make it happen.


--Josh Katzowitz

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter.











Posted on: June 17, 2010 6:42 pm
 

Whitworth speaks about expanded schedule

OK, I’ve had a chance to read the entire Mark Murphy transcript from Wednesday. Murphy, as you know, is the Packers president, and he’s the one who got the NFL universe buzzing about the expanded schedule, where the NFL would erase two preseason games and give you two extra regular-season games in return. He’s also an eight-year NFL veteran who made a Pro Bowl as a DB.

“I think the real roots of it are that as you look across the NFL and everything that we offer, we really try to provide top-quality value to our fans, whether it’s the regular season, postseason, the draft or the combine,” Murphy said in the conference call. “To me, the one that stands out as being different is the preseason. There just isn’t the same value there. I know from my position with the Packers, I get a lot of complaints (about the preseason). We actually just had focus groups with a number of our season-ticket holders and club-seat holders and had a lot of complaints about the preseason games. It just isn’t the same value there that you have in the regular season. I think there is a real issue there that we need to address.”

OK, but don’t you have to give the players more money if they’re going to play two more real games?

“Under the relationship that we have with the players, they get close to 60 percent of the revenue. If we grow the revenue, they are going to get more. They are currently playing 20 games, and we’re not increasing that. That would be the way that we would approach it. This is an opportunity for us to work together to grow revenue and improve the game.”

Sounds great for the fans who don’t have to pay regular-season prices to watch exhibition games, right? Yes. Sounds great for the scribes who don’t have to report on exhibition games, right? A double yes. But what about the players? Does it sound great for them?

Um, not quite as much. After the Bengals finished their final workout of the offseason today, I spoke to OT Andrew Whitworth, Cincinnati’s NFLPA player rep.

The transcript from my interview:

CBSSports.com: Lots of talk today and yesterday about the 18-game schedule. What are your thoughts?

Andrew Whitworth:
We want to do anything to make the game better for the fans. If an 18-game schedule will do that, that would be great. But there’s also some things player-wise and health-wise that might be an issue. We feel like if we’re going to have to do that, there has to be some things that change as far as the offseason and training camp.

CBS:
Are you talking about just the offseason stuff, or are you also talking about increased health care?

AW: You have to do one of two things; you have to improve the situation now with improving the OTAs or during the season where there’s less contact or you’ve got to attack the health-care issue and give the guys better health care when they’re done. Right now, with most players, even if they play 15 years, they only have – at the most – five year of health care. That’s kind of ridiculous what guys go through.

CBS:
Do you think the 18-game schedule will happen?

AW:
I think the owners definitely want it. I know they’ve prepared for it in their future schedules from what I’ve seen. It’s something they’ll go forward with. But there has to be other things that improve for that to happen.


--Josh Katzowitz

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @cbssportsnfl on Twitter.


 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com