Tag:Albert Haynesworth
Posted on: July 11, 2011 4:30 pm
Edited on: July 11, 2011 4:38 pm
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Hot Routes 7.11.11: Sounds like Favre's retired



Posted by Ryan Wilson

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  • We now have two players in the 2011 NFL Supplemental Draft. Former University of Georgia running back Caleb King joins Terrelle Pryor in a draft that usually takes place in mid-July but because of the lockout could happen sometime in the coming weeks. According to PFT, King received a grade of 4.9 from National Scouting, the same organization that gave Pryor a 5.1 (which translates into a sixth- or seventh-round pick).
  • Deion Sanders, like everybody else on the planet, is tired of talking about the lockout. So instead, he talks about himself. (To be fair, he was asked, and it's regarding his Hall of Fame enshrinement next month.)
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Posted on: July 7, 2011 11:45 am
Edited on: July 7, 2011 11:55 am
 

Report: PHI wants Haynesworth, WAS won't cut him

Posted by Ryan Wilson

We mentioned in Tuesday's Hot Routes that Albert Haynesworth had a suitor. New Eagles defensive line coach Jim Washburn was Haynesworth's position coach in Tennessee and, according to a Yahoo source, Washburn's "convinced he can get the most out of Haynesworth," and that "he wants him badly."

Now, via the Philadelphia Sports Daily's Tim McManus, the feeling's mutual: Haynesworth reportedly wants to come to Philly.

"It would be his greatest chance to rise amongst the elite a final time," McManus wrote Wednesday. "The 6-6, 335-pound tackle would be reunited with defensive line coach Jim Washburn and have a chance to play the type of ball that got him the seven-year, $100 million contract with the Redskins in the first place. Haynesworth is interested in attacking the quarterback; Washburn wants his linemen to do just that. Their final year together in Tennessee, such harmony resulted in 8½ sacks and three forced fumbles."

And then Haynesworth signed with the Redskins, where careers go to die. That's not to say he's without blame; in fact, you could make the case that the circumstances Haynesworth finds himself are mostly his doing. Still, that doesn't change anything; Washington got virtually nothing for their eight-figure investment, and even though it's clear the two sides would be better off without each other, that might not happen anytime soon, at least not without the Redskins getting something for their trouble.

A source tells McManus that “They are not going to cut [Haynesworth]. If the Eagles or anyone else wants him it is going to have to be by trade. Because if they cut him, that’s giving him his way.”

We wrote last month that the Redskins front office suffers from the sunk cost fallacy, an economic theory that says that GMs and coaches are unwilling to cut their losses with underperforming or overpriced players because they're the ones most attached to the investment (which is now a sunk cost). AdvancedNFLStats.com took it a step further: "New managers are not beholden to their predecessors’ sunk costs, and are freer to make rational decisions."

Which led us to write at the time: "Unfortunately for the Redskins, Allen -- who inherited Haynesworth from Vinny Cerrato -- hasn't followed that advice. Presumably because in the back of Allen's mind is the fear that if he cuts Haynesworth, not only does that mean tens of millions of dollars down the drain (sunk cost!), there's the chance that another team will sign him, and worse, he will play well."

NFL Network's Jason La Canfora said weeks ago that the 'Skins "should have taken a fifth for him last offseason and ended the circus then.”

Of course, this is the same outfit that not only traded within the division for Donovan McNabb and gave him a contract extension during the 2010 season, but benched him nine weeks later for Rex Grossman. As it stands, Washington will be lucky to get a fifth-rounder for McNabb.

The lesson: Don't spend lavishly on players who don't fit your system (this should be obvious, we know). And if you do, you can't be afraid to unload them to the highest bidder, even if it's less than market value. (The very same market, ironically, you inflated by overpaying for said players in the first place.)

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Posted on: July 5, 2011 3:49 pm
Edited on: July 5, 2011 5:03 pm
 

Hot Routes 7.05.11: Somebody wants Haynesworth



Posted by Ryan Wilson
  • Michael Clayton, the Bucs first-round pick in 2004, says his football career isn't over. In the last two seasons he caught 18 passes for 249 yards. After spending the first six years of his career in Tampa Bay, Clayton played with the Giants in 2010.
  • When Plaxico Burress was released from prison last month, the Eagles were considered one of the teams most likely to sign him. Now that the new-freedom smell has worn off, it sounds as if Burress is near the bottom of Philly's offseason to-do list.
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Posted on: July 1, 2011 5:15 pm
Edited on: July 1, 2011 5:51 pm
 

Hot Routes 7.01.11: Dareus mows lawn for rent



Posted by Ryan Wilson
  • Bucs CB Aqib Talib has a trial date: March 26, 2012, which means that his legal suit won't be settled until after the season. This is good news for his chances of playing in 2011, but bad news because Roger Goodell likely still looks forward to suspending him.
  • Sports Illustrated's Jim Trotter tweets that the Cards will try to trade for Kevin Kolb and the name he's hearing "will surprise you." Prepare accordingly.
  • Things that won't surprise you (but make you laugh nonetheless): Washingtonian readers Redskins owner the "worst local villain." He finished ahead of Marion Barry (!). And the worst local athlete? Albert Haynesworth, who was signed by … Dan Snyder.
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Posted on: June 15, 2011 8:52 pm
Edited on: June 16, 2011 12:11 am
 

Redskins need to consider life after Haynesworth

Posted by Ryan Wilson

A new labor deal may or may not be on the horizon, but when the owners and players come to an agreement, there will likely be an accelerated free-agency period followed by training camp and the regular season.

By that point, everything should be back to normal, which includes Albert Haynesworth making life difficult for some poor coach who thought he would be the one to motivate a man seemingly incapable of being motivated. Redskins coach Mike Shanahan was never under such illusions when he arrived in Washington last year. By the preseason it was clear they couldn't co-exist.

Just chalk it up as another one of Dan Snyder's high-priced personnel mistakes. (The 'Skins gave Haynesworth a $100 million deal in February 2009, including $41 million in guarantees.)

And now, even though Washington desperately needs some help along the defensive line, the rebuilding process won't include Haynesworth. NFL Network's Jason La Canfora figures "Aubrayo Franklin and Cullen Jenkins [will] get a good long look [from the 'Skins]," adding that “I think they’d trade (Haynesworth) for a seventh-round pick somewhere outside the division before they dealt him to the Eagles."

(La Canfora mentioned Philadelphia because Jim Washburn, Haynesworth's former defensive line coach in Tennessee, now coaches the Eagles' defensive line.) 

“They should have taken a fifth for him last offseason and ended the circus then,” La Canfora continued. “We shall see. Skins GM Bruce Allen has repeatedly told Haynesworth’s people that if they don’t get ‘real value’ in a trade they won’t move him, but I don’t see them getting anything better than a fifth for him, and they have wanted much more than that.”

Allen's thinking isn't unique to the Redskins. It's prevalent among teams that fork over substantial paydays for big-name free agents only to get in return substandard performances and less salary-cap wiggle room. Instead of cutting bait and moving on, they suffer from what economists call the "sunk cost fallacy." In English, it's simply throwing good money after bad.

Brian Burke of AdvancedNFLStats.com talked about the sunk cost fallacy late in the 2009 season, relating it to JaMarcus Russell.
Russell certainly isn’t the only top pick who was kept under center too long. Just about every team has had a similar experience in recent memory. General managers and coaches are the ones least willing to cut their losses with bad players because they’re the ones most attached to the sunk costs. The importance of responsibility is why it makes some sense to periodically replace senior management, whether at corporation, a government agency, or professional football team. New managers are not beholden to their predecessors’ sunk costs, and are freer to make rational decisions.
Unfortunately for the Redskins, Allen -- who inherited Haynesworth from Vinny Cerrato -- hasn't followed that advice. Presumably because in the back of Allen's mind is the fear that if he cuts Haynesworth, not only does that mean tens of millions of dollars down the drain (sunk cost!), there's the chance that another team will sign him, and worse, he will play well.

To paraphrase an an old saying: "A player is worth what somebody's willing to pay for him." Which is usually muttered right before someone else says, "It only takes one team." The problem: "one team" has historically referred to the Redskins, an outfit renown for paying well over market rates -- either in salary or draft picks -- for locker room malcontents, players on the downside of great careers or both.

Of course, if Allen promptly jettisons Haynesworth when the lockout ends, and Bill Belichick signs him for the league minimum, expect the media to hail the decision as "low-risk" and "genius." It's this thinking that got the Redskins in their current predicament.

On the upside, Washington gets a $41 million paperweight out of it. So there's that.

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Posted on: June 7, 2011 11:58 pm
 

Next person to trash Haynesworth? His DC

HaynesworthPosted by Josh Katzowitz

The “Albert Haynesworth is a lazy, worthless piece of garbage” stories are not difficult to find on the Eye on Football blog. Whether he’s been charged with sexual abuse, accused of road rage, or suspended for the last four games of the season, it’s actually pretty difficult to find a positive story about Haynesworth.

This post, thanks to Redskins defensive coordinator Jim Haslett, continues that theme.

Today, Haslett told 101 ESPN Radio in St. Louis (via Pro Football Talk) that Haynesworth basically is a worthless piece of garbage (he didn't say it quite that harshly, though).

“He can do almost anything he wants. He doesn’t want to do anything. To me that’s the issue,” Haslett said. “He’s one of those guys you walk in a meeting and you tell him, ‘Put down the phone.’ The next day you have to tell him to put down the phone. The next day, you tell him to put down the phone.

“You tell him, ‘Don’t read the newspaper in meetings.’ The next day you have to tell him the same thing. It doesn’t stick; it’s an everyday thing.”

It is possible to feel some sympathy for Haynesworth, because he was told he wouldn’t have to play a 3-4 defense before the Redskins coaching staff decided to, you know, implement the 3-4 defense.

So, if you want to make the claim that the team went back on its word to Haynesworth, that’s a fair point.

But the lack of professionalism (picking up his phone and reading the newspaper during team meetings? Really?!?!) apparently displayed by Haynesworth continues to astound. And when his defensive coordinator is the one calling him out, that’s pretty darn telling.

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Posted on: May 10, 2011 11:31 am
 

Haynesworth pleads not guilty to sexual abuse

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

With Albert Haynesworth already declining to take a deal offered by prosecutors in his misdemeanor sexual abuse case, the fact he pleaded not guilty today to the charge shouldn’t come as a surprise.

Haynesworth's troubles
Haynesworth wasn’t in attendance this morning, but a court date of July 11 was set.

Via the Washington Post, Haynesworth’s lawyer, A. Scott Bolden, said he requested an early trial date in case there is to be training camp for 2011 (wishful thinking, right?).

As for why Haynesworth’s accuser – a waitress at the W Hotel who claimed Haynesworth caressed her breast Feb. 12 – went through with the case.

 Bolden, who said he will call as many as five witnesses during the trial, has a theory: “It’s about money.”

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Posted on: April 27, 2011 7:03 pm
Edited on: April 28, 2011 11:48 am
 

Haynesworth won't entertain plea deal

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

Earlier we told you about a plea deal that prosecutors offered Redskins DT Albert Haynesworth on his sexual assault charges (if he accepted, Haynesworth would plead guilty to a charge of simple assault).

Haynesworth, through his attorney, has responded: no thank you.

According to the Associated Press, Haynesworth’s lawyer, A. Scott Bolden, wrote in an e-mail that the offer was “"no deal at all, nor is it one we would entertain. … My client is prepared to, and will vigorously fight these charges.”

If he changes his mind, Haynesworth has until May 17 to accept the deal.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com