Tag:Jack Del Rio
Posted on: October 20, 2010 10:51 pm
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Jaguars hurting at quarterback (more than usual)

Posted by Andy Benoit

Jacksonville Jaguars coach Jack Del Rio could be on the show Hoarders. Some people collect cats. Some collect magazines and newspapers. Some prefer garbage. Del Rio? He likes quarterbacks.

The Jaguars brought in yet another signal-caller Wednesday, this one just as washed up as all the others. Former first-round pick Patrick Ramsey, who has been a fringe backup for the past five years, was signed just days after ex-Saints backup Todd Bouman (last NFL start: 2005) was brought in. Here’s the kicker: Ramsey and Bouman split repetitions in practice on Wednesday.
J. Del Rio (US Presswire)
Maybe Del Rio doesn’t have a quarterback hoarding problem. It’s not like he’s Jon Gruden. The Jaguars’ frequent quarterback transactions (in addition to these two signings, they picked up ex-Bill Trent Edwards a few weeks ago) have been out of necessity.

Backup Luke McCown was lost for the season (ACL) in Week 1. Starter David Garrard suffered a concussion against the Titans on Monday. And Trent Edwards sprained his thumb after hitting it on a Titans helmet. The Jags nearly had to go to third quarterback Zach Miller, who, unfortunately, is actually a tight end.

Garrard is said to be improving, though before he can return to action, NFL rules mandate that he be medically cleared by an independent third party. If he is unable to go against the Chiefs on Sunday, it will be either Bouman or Ramsey under center.
Whoever it is, the Jags need to make sure he’s prepared. Del Rio was not happy with the play-calling limitations that came with Edwards being on the field Monday night (you may recall, the Jags essentially milked the clock during their fruitless fourth quarter comeback effort). Of the run-heavy late fourth quarter drive, Del Rio said:

"The best explanation I can give you is the fact that we just did some of the plays that we could do with Trent and where we were prepared to handle that particular situation.

"I wasn't wild about the consecutive runs there ... I would have loved to have seen us be able to score, at all, but score quicker. We spent too much time, in my opinion. ... We were a little bit handcuffed with a quarterback that had been here two weeks and that's part of what you have to fight through as a football team, preparing for different scenarios. And we got caught a little bit there and a little bit short in terms of what Trent was able to do and what we were able to do. ... I don't find it acceptable."

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Posted on: October 19, 2010 9:15 pm
Edited on: October 19, 2010 9:16 pm
 

Hot Routes 10.19.10 vi




Posted by Will Brinson

Got a link for the Hot Routes? Hit us up on Twitter (@CBSSportsNFL).
  • Vince Young thought his season was over when he left the field on Monday night. That's understandable, especially considering how close Young appeared to being seriously injured when he fumbled a snap, recovered the snap and then tried to get up and run with the ball even after his knee hit the ground. Instincts and athleticism and whatever aside, there's only one option at that point in time for any NFL quarterback: fall on the freaking ball and lay there, praying you don't get smushed.
  • Sean Payton was apparently running his mouth against the Buccaneers on Sunday. That seems karmically foolish for the same reasons as pointing and laughing at your seven-year-old cousin when you block his basketball shots is mean. Or something. 
  • This may come as a surprise, but Jacksonville Jaguars fans are about as happy with Jack Del Rio as anyone who played against Chris Johnson in fantasy this week.
Posted on: October 19, 2010 7:39 pm
Edited on: October 19, 2010 7:41 pm
 

Did Jeff Fisher spill a secret?

Posted by Andy Benoit

It was chaos earlier today for my poor colleague Will Brinson. First, Jeff Fisher suggested that he was asked to use his timeouts late in the Monday Night blowout because the network (ESPN) still had some commercials to get to. Not long after Will wrote about this (with a little critical analysis sprinkled in), it was reported that Fisher was actually joking. So, Will had to do a mea culpa (not his fault; we’ve all been there). J. Fisher (US Presswire)

But it was later learned that Fisher was NOT joking after all. (Is there a specific word for undoing a mea culpa?) Fisher tried to explain to the media on Tuesday exactly what happened. This is potentially big news because Fisher may be lifting the veil off one of the secret hush-hush business aspects of football and television.

Take a look at what he said:

“At the two-minute warning in every game in the fourth quarter, there are conversations that go by. There's conversations that take place at the two-minute warning before the first half. But there's conversations that take place, and it's the official's responsibility to give the head coach a status of commercials and TV timeouts. Yesterday, I was told that they were two short. And they looked at me and smiled, and I said, 'Sorry, I can't help you.' Mike Carey came across and said, 'Here's the deal. We're two short.' And I said, 'Mike, I can't help you. I'm trying to get a first down and I'm gonna kneel on it.'”

“Jack (Del Rio) used his timeouts. Whether Jack used his timeouts because the official said we're two commercials short, or he used them to stop the clock to get his quarterback Trent Edwards some reps remains to be seen,” Fisher said. “My feeling is I had no issue with him using the timeouts. I completely understand. You've got a backup quarterback in that's been there for what, two weeks, and he wants to get him some reps. So I completely understand it, even though the game was out of reach.”

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Posted on: October 19, 2010 1:03 pm
Edited on: October 19, 2010 1:34 pm
 

Fisher jokes that ESPN asked him to call timeouts

Posted by Will Brinson

Monday night, a lot of people either lost or won fantasy games (/raises hand angrily in the air) when Chris Johnson broke a 35-yard run for a touchdown to give the Titans30-3 beatdown victory over Jacksonville at Everbank Field. It should have been 23-3, but after the two-minute warning, Jack Del Rio inexplicably started burning timeouts with the game out of hand.

Turns out, there may be an awkward reason why he kept stopping the time -- Jeff Fisher said in his postgame press conference that he was asked to use them as well.

"Jack used his timeouts," Fisher said following the game. "So, [taking a knee] does me no good. Plus, my understanding is we needed some network timeouts, and that's why Jack used his timeouts. They came over and asked me to do it, but I said, 'I was hoping to get a first down and kneel on it.' And so, anyway."

According to Terry McCormick of Titans Insider, Fisher had never heard of such a thing happening.

“You can check with Jack. It didn't bother me at all. I believe that they asked them to use them. It's the first time I've heard of it,” Fisher said. “I just said I would have a hard time using them, because I'm ahead. Honestly, I have no issues with Jack or how he managed the end of that game. It's just what it was, and I don't think he would have an issue with me handing the ball off."

He's not the only one, either -- burning timeouts in a game as out of hand as that only serves a few people: the advertisers, ESPN (vis-a-vis the advertisers' happiness) and maybe Jaguars players that need additional repetitions at the end of the game.

Considering that David Garrard was ruled out of the game with a concussion, and that the only backup to Trent Edwards was tight end Zach Miller, the last reason actually makes Del Rio's decision to stop the clock a little bit questionable, provided that ESPN did ask him to use his timeouts.

Not that I want to get all conspiracy theory on ESPN, much less question Del Rio's integrity (and besides, it is a competitive game of sport, and there's no law against stopping the clock or running up the score), but extending the game also extended the chance for an injury, even if it did curry favor with the network responsible for broadcasting the only professional football shown on Monday nights.

And if Fisher is correct here, and that's what happened, well, it wasn't just my win in fantasy football that ended awkwardly this week.

Update (1:32): As it turns out, Jeff Fisher was apparently JOKING about the network asking him to call timeouts at the end of the game. Which makes me feel like a jerk for calling out either ESPN or Jack Del Rio (sorry guys), but doesn't change the fact that I'm still supremely angry at Fisher for letting Johnson get over a 100 and find the end zone.

That's according to Doug Farrar, who contacted McCormick about the comments, and even though none of this conspiracy theory stuff happened, well, Del Rio still should have let the time run out, if only for the sake of not having to put Zach Miller under center.
Posted on: October 12, 2010 11:58 am
 

NFL welcomes Nike, drops Reebok

We can only hope that Nike can design a suit as well as Reebok did for Jack Del Rio (Getty). Posted by Josh Katzowitz

The NFL announced today at its annual fall meeting in Chicago that Nike will provide its game uniforms beginning in 2012, meaning Reebok – which had been the official outfitter – has been shut out completely from the NFL.

Beginning in April 2012, Nike will provide the uniforms, sideline personnel apparel and fan gear.

Among the other deals approved by the league owners:

-New Era will supply the on-field headwear and will produce headwear for the sidelines and fans.

-Under Armour will continue to be the official sponsor of the NFL Combine and will offer Combine apparel beginning in 2012.

-GIII will continue to help manufacture fan gear, including men’s and women’s outerwear.

-VF will continue to manufacture fan gear, including T-shirts and fleece.

-Outerstuff will continue to provide the league’s youth apparel.

-’47 Brand will produce headwear for fans.

“We have spent considerable time the past few years rigorously evaluating our apparel business,” said Eric Grubman, the NFL’s executive vice president of NFL ventures and business operations. “The new framework will provide fans with a wider breadth of merchandise from global category leaders in the sports licensed apparel industry.”

Yes, but can Nike make a suit for Jack Del Rio (pictured above) like the one Reebok did? That’s what I want to know.

Barring that, here's some interesting analysis by CNBC's Darren Rovell on the new deals.

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Category: NFL
Tags: Jack Del Rio
 
Posted on: October 3, 2010 9:46 pm
 

A special win for the Jaguars

J. Scobee celebrated after kicking his 59-yard game winning field goal (AP). Posted by Josh Katzowitz

When Jacksonville PK Josh Scobee’s 59-yard field goal barely sailed over the cross-bar as time expired and into the Jaguars mascots arms, the jubilation could begin. Scobee yanked off his helmet and ran screaming around the field.

"I've never been that excited to hit a field goal in my life,” Scobee told reporters after the game, including Rapid Reporter Jim Nasella.

You can forgive his excitement. For a team that has faced much adversity this season – tepid fan support, a coach in Jack Del Rio whose backside was beginning to feel rather warm, a QB situation that is stomach-churning, a defense that hasn’t been impressive and a squad coming off the worst back-to-back beatings in club history – beating the Colts was a moment of pure joy.

Much of the credit must go to RB Maurice Jones-Drew (26 carries, 105 yards, one receiving TD and one rushing TD), but QB David Garrard had quite a game as well. He was 17 of 22 for 163 yards and two scores, and he led the Jaguars on a last-minute, 59-yard drive that set up Scobee for the game-ending heroics.

"Jacksonville did a good job of controlling the clock,'' Colts WR Reggie Wayne said. "Nothing you can do, the guy (Scobee) boomed it.’’

Plus, you can’t forget the offensive line, which kept Garrard upright and shut down the Colts fearsome pass rush of Dwight Freeney and Robert Mathis.

More than anything, it was simply a special win for a team in desperate need of one.

“It was a great moment in that locker room,'' Del Rio said. "I said, 'Guys you want to savor this. You want to get together tomorrow and enjoy it.'”

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Posted on: September 28, 2010 9:59 am
Edited on: September 28, 2010 5:07 pm
 

Top Ten with a Twist: Biggest problems

Mike Singletary has led his San Francisco squad to an 0-3 start to the season (AP).
Posted by Josh Katzowitz

The first game, if your favorite team has a bad day at the office, you can forgive it. “Ah, it’s just one game,” you might say. “My men have plenty of time, and it was the first game of the season. Obviously, they haven’t worked out all the kinks.” You can still sleep at night.

The second game, if your team stinks up the joint again, you can forgive it. With reservations. “OK, it’s only two games. The season is still long. You can still make the playoffs if you start it out 0-2. They’re still figuring things out.” You still sleep at night, though probably not as soundly.

By the third game, though, if your team is still playing really, really poorly, you might have a tough time catching those Z's. By game three, problem teams – and problem players – are becoming more “the trend” and less “just a phase.” Your team might really suck, after all. Your favorite player might officially be over the hill.

You might officially have a problem.

10. Carson Palmer:
I’ve watched Palmer closely the past five or six years, and after the Jets beat Cincinnati in the playoffs last year, I wrote Palmer was no longer an elite quarterback (you can’t be elite, after all, if your stats fall somewhere between Jason Campbell and David Garrard). He’s continued his struggles this year, and though, the Bengals don’t need him quite as much if they have a healthy Cedric Benson, you can close the book on him as one of the best in the game.

9. Shawne Merriman’s Achilles/Andre Johnson’s ankle: Let’s combine two annoying injuries for players who would do well to stay on the field. Merriman, who missed much of the preseason because of a holdout/Achilles injury, played the last two weeks, but he had to leave Sunday’s contest because of a calf injury. Though he’s not the player he once was, he’s a better option for San Diego than Antwan Applewhite and Brandon Lang. And Johnson’s ankle is self-explanatory. If he’s not on the field – and he’s had to miss part of the past two games – the Texans offense isn’t nearly as potent.

8. David Garrard: I know, I hate putting two QBs on here in the first three picks, but, unlike Palmer, I’m not sure why Garrard is still playing with the first string. I mean, aside from Todd Bouman (hasn’t thrown a pass in five seasons) being his only backup. Coach Jack Del Rio was asked how much longer he could play Garrard, and Del Rio said as long as he was the team’s best option. Meaning he’s the team’s only option. Which is bad news.

7. Ben Roethlisberger’s return:
This isn’t about Roethlisberger necessarily and I assume coach Mike Tomlin will give him back his job when he returns from his four-game suspension, but the Steelers could be 4-0 playing a combination of Dennis Dixon and Charlie Batch. Roethlisberger obviously is a better QB than either of those two, but he’ll probably be rusty. What if he struggles against the Browns in his first game? What if Miami’s defense lights him up the week after that? Will Steelers fans be chanting Charlie Batch’s name (probably not, but you never know …)?

6. Brandyn Dombrowski:
So, how soon can Marcus McNeill return for San Diego? Dombrowski, playing LT and trying to protect Philip Rivers’ blindside, had a tough time against Seattle on Sunday, Chris Clemons toasted him a few times to sack Rivers, and on the Chargers’ first attempt to get within two late in the game – the first time Rivers hit TE Antonio Gates – Dombrowski was called for holding. San Diego coach Norv Turner has defended him, but Dombrowski had a rough one in the Chargers loss.

G. Hartley had a rough week for New Orleans last week and is in danger of losing his job (AP). 5. Garrett Hartley: It’s hard to believe how badly Hartley missed his game-winning 29-yard field goal in overtime of the Falcons victory against the Saints. Coach Sean Payton has shown plenty of loyalty to Hartley, but Hartley directly cost New Orleans the game Sunday. How many more games will he negatively impact the Saints before he’s off the team? Maybe, none. John Carney and Matt Stover apparently have tried out for the Saints this week, and at this point, if Hartley lasts the year in New Orleans, it’d be kind of a surprise. 

4. The entire AFC/NFC West: We’ll get into San Francisco’s Mike Singletary in a minute, but man, how inconsistent have these conferences been? Oakland has been terrible (against Tennessee), less terrible (a win against St. Louis), and almost not terrible enough to win again (a 24-23 loss to Arizona). Derek Anderson has worked his anti-magic for the Cardinals. And you still don’t know what you’re going to get when Seattle runs onto the field for the game. I'm still shocked St. Louis beat Washington. These divisions are wide open for the taking, especially when Kansas City starts 3-0 and leads the AFC West.

3. Chargers kick return coverage:
OK, so you saw what Leon Washington did against San Diego on Sunday, returning a kick for 101 yards for the TD and then returning another kick for 99 yards. That was unreal. But don’t forget about Kansas City’s Dexter McCluster, who had a 94-yard punt return in the season opener vs. San Diego. On Monday, several Chargers veterans volunteered for special teams duties in order to help improve that unit. Hey, it certainly couldn’t hurt.

2. Giants discipline:
Remember how Antrel Rolle complained about how much control the coaching staff held over the players? Well, that’s not exactly true, especially when we’re talking about New York’s 11 penalties, including five personal fouls that occurred after the play was over, in its bad loss to Tennessee. Two 15-yarders came courtesy of RT Kareem McKenzie (behavior McKenzie called “despicable” the next day), and Rolle incurred one when he tried to punch Tennessee TE Craig Stevens. With performances like that, you have to wonder what kind of control coach Tom Coughlin actually asserts over his players. And how much longer he’ll be in control of the Giants at all.

1. Mike Singletary:
After the 49ers 31-10 beatdown by the Chiefs, word filtered out that Kansas City’s defenders apparently were calling out San Francisco’s play calls before the plays were actually run. Now, the 49ers are 0-3, and maybe, aside from pulling down his pants to motivate his team, Singletary doesn’t exactly seem like an X’s and O’s guy. He actually was asked after the game if he had been outcoached, and he said, “I would not say ‘outcoached.’ When you have a loss like this, a lot of things look wrong.” Like the offense. And a day after backing his offensive coordinator Jimmy Raye and saying he’d be around the rest of the season, Singletary fired him. That means new offensive coordinator Mike Johnson continues the streak of Alex Smith never playing for the same coordinator in back-to-back seasons. I’m sure that will help.

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Posted on: September 28, 2010 9:07 am
 

Garrard starts 'as long as he's our best option'

Posted by Will Brinson

Later today, we'll talk quarterbacks in more depth, but Jack Del Rio's resoundingly complimentary quotes to the media yesterday re: David Garrard deserves a little attention now. Obviously, the Jaguars, after getting a big first game out of Garrard, are struggling mightily right now, and their starting quarterback is struggling even more.

Garrard tossed four picks against the Chargers in Week 2 and then went 13 for 30 for 105 yards, no TDs and an interception against the Eagles this past week. Needless to say, Del Rio is answering plenty of questions about his guy. Like, for instance, "How long will he continue to start?"

"As long as he's our best option," Del Rio responded.

That sounds like my dad on a childhood camping trip when we'd wonder aloud if we will "continue to eat Beanie Weenies" -- in this sort of response, "best" doesn't so much apply in the Webster's sense ("excelling all others" or "most productive of good" or "offering or producing the greatest advantage, utility or satisfaction") so much as really means "only."

In case that wasn't clearly implied, Del Rio also called this an "urgent time" for the Jaguars. And it is -- they welcome the Colts this coming week and a loss, especially coupled with Houston and Tennessee winning, would push the Jags two-plus games back of the division lead and keep warming Del Rio's already quite warm seat.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com