Tag:Aaron Rodgers
Posted on: February 16, 2012 10:22 am
Edited on: February 16, 2012 11:23 am
  •  
 

Agent: Flacco is 'in the top five' for QB money

Maybe Flacco should just get Brady's contract? (Getty Images)
By Will Brinson

On Tuesday we mentioned that Joe Flacco's camp and the Ravens might start talking about a new contract next week at the 2012 NFL Combine. We also discussed where Flacco fits in terms of the financial quarterback hierarchy, noting that surely he deserves to be paid more than Matt Cassel, Kevin Kolb or Ryan Fitzpatrick, $60-million men in their own right.

Apparently, we badly undershot the expectations of Flacco's camp -- Flacco's agent Joe Linta told Matt Vensel of the Baltimore Sun that the Ravens quarterback needs to get the same kind of money that a top-five quarterback would expect.

"If the game is about wins and losses, he has to be in the top five [quarterbacks],” Linta said. “He is a player who has been extremely durable, never missed a game. And he’s done something that no one has ever done. In his four years in the league, he has never missed a game and has more wins than any other quarterback."

Now, the reaction to this "WHAT?" That's understandable, because Flacco, frankly, isn't a top-five quarterback in the NFL. He's probably (definitely?) not a top-ten quarterback either. (If we were picking quarterbacks to start a team looking to win both now and in the future, we'd take Flacco 15th.)

But Linta phrased this perfectly. If the game is about wins and losses, then, yes, Flacco is a top-five quarterback. Only Drew Brees, Tom Brady, Aaron Rodgers and Alex Smith won more games in 2011. And Flacco's won a lot of playoff games and showed that he can perform under pressure in 2011, even if his overall game took a step back.

But Flacco doesn't win those games by himself. The Ravens ranking No. 3 in overall defense in 2011 helped somewhat. As did Ray Rice and Ricky Williams rumbling Baltimore to a top-10 ranking in rushing yards.

The "quarterback wins" argument is a tired one, in our opinion, but one that still holds water, especially when negotiating a contract. But that being said, if Linta can parlay Flacco's NFL career into "top-five money," he'll be the big winner, since every single NFL player should hire him to negotiate their deals.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter, Like Us on Facebook, subscribe to our NFL newsletter, and while you're add it, add our RSS Feed.
Posted on: February 11, 2012 6:38 pm
 

VIDEO: Belichick mourning loss at Pebble Beach

By Josh Katzowitz

For those who have a problem with Rob Gronkowski dancing shirtless a few hours after the Patriots Super Bowl XLVI loss, they'll probably be infuriated with the video you’ll see below -- namely Bill Belichick enjoying his time playing golf at Pebble Beach this weekend with Alabama coach Nick Saban.

“It’s awesome,” Belichik said. “It’s great to spend time with Nick and the pros here. Just to be out here at Pebble Beach.”

And though Belichick, we assume, hadn’t played golf since August, he apparently played quite well and made the cut with Ricky Barnes at the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am. It’s not like he was dancing shirtless (though check out the hoodie he wears in the interview with Jim Nantz and Nick Faldo), but still, it’s disappointing he wasn’t mourning the Super Bowl XLVI loss for at least a week (I kid, I kid).

“It’s been tough,” Belichick said. “It’s a tough couple days, but Pebble Beach is a great spot to take your mind off some of the troubles we had.”



And as an added bonus, I’ll go ahead and post this video of Aaron Rodgers and Darius Rucker. It’s awesome: Rodgers and Rucker together again, a long-awaited reunion that finally came to fruition.



For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter, Like Us on Facebook, subscribe to our NFL newsletter, and while you're add it, add our RSS Feed.
Posted on: February 5, 2012 11:27 am
Edited on: February 6, 2012 8:59 am
 

Goodell: NFL 'considering eliminating' Pro Bowl

Goodell said the Pro Bowl could be eliminated. (Getty Images)
By Will Brinson

INDIANAPOLIS -- Last Sunday's Pro Bowl was a sloppily-played joke of a game that was ripped by fans and the media. Aaron Rodgers came out and said some of his NFC teammates should be "embarrassed" by the way they played. LeSean McCoy told us that he was "one of those guys" who didn't try.

Which may explain why Roger Goodell said on Sunday morning that the NFL is "considering eliminating" the Pro Bowl.

Latest from the Super Bowl

"I really didn't think that was the kind of football that we want to be demonstrating for our fans," Goodell said on Mike and Mike Sunday morning. "And you heard it from the fans. The fans were actively booing in the stands. They didn't like what they were seeing."

At the very least, Goodell said, something's going to change or the game will go away.

"We're either going to have to improve the quality of what we're doing in the Pro Bowl or consider other changes or even considering eliminating the game if that's the kind of quality game we're going to provide," Goodell said. "I know players love to be in Hawaii but we have to start with the quality of what we're doing.

"If the fans are responding negatively to what we're doing, we better listen. And that was my message."

Say whatever you want about Goodell (and if you're a Steelers fan, you'll probably say a lot), but the guy knows how to make the game of football more popular. If getting rid of the Pro Bowl does that, then Goodell won't hesitate to do so.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter, Like Us on Facebook, subscribe to our NFL newsletter, and while you're add it, add our RSS Feed.

Posted on: February 2, 2012 11:10 am
 

Matt Flynn to Miami still would be a risk

Flynn

By Josh Katzowitz

People can’t seem to help but get excited about Packers and soon-to-be free agent quarterback Matt Flynn. Although he’s only started two career games in four seasons, all spent backing up Aaron Rodgers, his time on the field has been productive. Hell, it’s been record-setting, like when he set franchise marks with 480 passing yards and six touchdowns in Green Bay’s Week 17 win vs. the Lions.

Since that performance, the Redskins and Dolphins reportedly have had interest in obtaining his services, and though Miami could very well go after Peyton Manning if the Colts cut him loose, receiver Brandon Marshall reached out to Flynn about making the move to south Florida.

"Obviously, Matt [Moore] had a great year," Marshall said at the Pro Bowl. "You don't want to take anything away from Matt, but I think we really [should] bring in somebody who can compete and make the team better."

That person, in Marshall’s mind, could be Flynn, but there are two things to remember before Miami fans welcome Flynn with a ticker-tape parade in South Beach.

In like Matt Flynn
1) Flynn has taken significant snaps only twice in the past two years. Sure, he performed well in both cases -- he nearly beat the Patriots in 2010 -- but it’s still only two games. That isn’t much of a sample size.

2) Current Dolphins starter Matt Moore had a solid year, taking over for Chad Henne as Miami’s quarterback. Yes, Flynn probably has a more exciting name, though certainly not a better resume, and he has more upside than Moore. But Moore has proven he’s a solid quarterback in the league. We can’t say that yet about Flynn.

But here’s why the Flynn-to-Miami rumblings make sense. New coach Joe Philbin is coming off a strong reign as the Packers offensive coordinator, and though most of us don’t know how Flynn performs on a daily basis at practice, you can be sure Philbin knows exactly what Flynn can do. And if Philbin wants Flynn, how could anybody argue that?

“With Matt Flynn, know what he can’t do, and make sure you build the offense around things he can do,” Lombardi told Ben Volin of the Palm Beach Post. “Obviously, Joe Philbin knows him.”

Still, that doesn’t mean Flynn isn’t a risk. After all, remember the $63 million contract the Cardinals bestowed on Kevin Kolb last offseason, even though Kolb only had a limited resume? How well did that work out for Arizona?

“I don’t think it’s risky to go get him. I think it’s risky to give him $60 million, or give him $20 million over two years like Kevin Kolb,” Lombardi told the Post. “I think there’s a lot of chance for failure there.”

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter, Like Us on Facebook, subscribe to our NFL newsletter, and while you're add it, add our RSS Feed.
Posted on: January 31, 2012 3:42 pm
 

Rodgers 'embarrassed' by NFC effort in Pro Bowl

A. Rodgers said he was embarrassed by the NFC's players effort in the Pro Bowl (US Presswire).

By Josh Katzowitz

The Pro Bowl, as we all know, is a joke.

We tried making some suggestions last year (um, hello, running clock?!?), and this year, we described why the changes the NFL did make didn’t improve the quality of the game.

Not only do we see this game as an exercise in irrelevance, mostly because the players’ effort is lacking, but apparently so does Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers.

During his regular appearance on ESPN Milwaukee, Rodgers said  the NFC players “embarrassed themselves” during the game last Sunday. He also said he was "disappointed in the lack of pride.”

Said Rodgers: “I feel like there should be some pride involved in a game like that, and I was just surprised by some of the efforts of some of the guys. This was my second Pro Bowl. (I) played in the one in 2010. It was down in Fort Lauderdale/Miami. I felt that that one had a lot more energy.

“The AFC side obviously had more energy. I think they were upset about the second onside kick (called by Packers coach Mike McCarthy), and at that point they played a lot harder than we did. But even in the early going, they were playing definitely harder than we were.”

Obviously, there’s no reason for the Pro Bowl selections to go all out and risk injury, and the NFL enforces special rules in the game to decrease those chances as well. But when the defensive linemen are basically shaking hands with the offensive linemen each time the ball is snapped and when would-be-tacklers let ball-rushers run right by them for touchdowns, you have to ask yourself, what’s the point of watching this?

And maybe now Rodgers is asking himself, what’s the point of playing?

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter, Like Us on Facebook, subscribe to our NFL newsletter, and while you're add it, add our RSS Feed.
Posted on: January 16, 2012 7:43 pm
Edited on: January 16, 2012 11:19 pm
 

Coughlin upset by 2 calls vs. GB, NFL explains

Tom Coughlin is oh-fer on his last eight challenges. (NFL.com)

By Ryan Wilson

NFL fans are familiar with Bill Leavy. He was the official in Super Bowl XL, often referred to as "that game where the Steelers were gifted the Lombardi Trophy over the Seahawks." After two controversial calls in Sunday's Giants-Packers game, Leavy is back, again for the wrong reasons.

First, there was what appeared to be a Greg Jennings fumble in which he was initially ruled down by contact. The Giants challenged, replays showed that Jennings had in fact fumbled, and all that was left was for Leavy to emerge from under the hood and announce that it was New York's ball. Except that didn't happen. Instead, inexplicably, he declared that "the ruling on the field stands."

(We went into this in great detail in Monday's Pick-6 Podcast, as well if the NFL should go to full-time officials. Spoiler alert: No. Either way, you can listen below.)


On Monday, the league explained Leavy's decision (via PFT).

“Rule 7, Section 2, Article 1 of the NFL Rule Book (page 35) states: ‘An official shall declare the ball dead and the down ended: (a) when a runner is contacted by a defensive player and touches the ground with any part of his body other than his hands or feet,’” the league said in a statement emailed to PFT by NFL spokesman Greg Aiello. “So by rule, if Jennings’ calf was on the ground prior to the ball coming loose, he is down by contact. Contrary to what was suggested during the game, there is no need for the runner’s knee to be on the ground.”

Uh-huh. We suppose you could look at this replay and say that maybe Jennings' shin (really, the shin?) was down before the ball came out. But you could also argue that Jennings lost possession before his shin contacted the turf.


Jennings sure looked like he fumbled.

In general, we don't like to whinge about the officiating because by the end of the season, it usually evens out for everybody. And credit to New York. Despite two atrocious calls (the other was when Osi Umenyiora was flagged for a helmet-to-helmet hit on Aaron Rodgers even though no part of his helmet came close to Rodgers' head), they won by 37-20.

A day later, Giants head coach Tom Coughlin remained confused by the two calls. He was asked Monday if there was anything on film that made the Jennings' non-fumble clearer. “There is but I won’t get into it,’’ he said.

And Umenyiora's roughing-the-passer penalty?

“Aggressive football play,’’ Coughlin said via the New York Post. “The quarterback is following through as he releases the ball. The hit is from the side. There’s not helmet involved. It’s from the shoulders to waist. We’ll coach that one forever.’’

Now all that's left if for Leavy to apologize to the Giants and their fans. That generally takes about four years.

Here's what he told the media in August 2010, unprompted:

"It was a tough thing for me. I kicked two calls in the fourth quarter [of Super Bowl XL between the Steelers and Seahawsk] and I impacted the game and as an official you never want to do that. It left me with a lot of sleepless nights and I think about it constantly. I'll go to my grave wishing that I'd been better. I know that I did my best at that time, but it wasn't good enough. When we make mistakes, you got to step up and own them. It's something that all officials have to deal with, but unfortunately when you have to deal with it in the Super Bowl it's difficult."

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter, subscribe to our NFL newsletter, and while you're at it, add our RSS Feed.
Posted on: January 15, 2012 10:36 pm
 

Joe Philbin's presence 'meant a lot' to Packers

Philbin's presence "meant a lot" to Green Bay Sunday. (AP)
By Will Brinson

Packers offensive coordinator Joe Philbin made an extremely difficult decision this past week and coached during Green Bay's game against the Giants on Sunday despite his son dying less than a week ago.

It took an immense amount of courage to do so, and Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers expressed after the 37-20 loss just how much it meant.

“It meant a lot just having him here," Rodgers said, via our Packers Rapid Reporter James Carlton. "I think deep down a lot of us wanted to get this one for him, give some happiness to him and his family."

Prior to the game, Rodgers huddled the team up and they chanted "family!" before running out on the field. It was an obvious tribute to Philbin.

It's unfortunate that the team couldn't come through for their offensive coordinator in this tough time, but it's also telling of his relationship with his players and the team that he found it comforting (one would assume) to join them at Lambeau Field on Sunday.

And it's also telling of his character and dedication to the Packers that he came to work despite the worst-possible circumstances. Clearly, it meant a lot.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter, Like Us on Facebook, subscribe to our NFL newsletter, and while you're add it, add our RSS Feed.
Posted on: January 15, 2012 6:24 pm
 

Eli's Hail Mary gives Giants 20-10 lead at half

Nicks had a monster first half, including a Hail Mary reception to end the half. (Getty Images)
By Will Brinson

With six seconds on the clock before halftime, the Giants declined to try a 55-yard field goal at Lambeau Field and let Eli Manning chunk a Hail Mary ... which ended up in the hands of Hakeem Nicks for an incredible touchdown that stunned Packers fans and gave the Giants a 20-10 lead going into half.

The sad part is, the Giants are up by 10, and it could be much more: a would-be Greg Jennings fumble wasn't overturned by Bill Leavy's crew, and the Packers went on to score their only touchdown of the game.

Manning's been great for the most part, but he's made some mistakes, including a terrible pass that was picked by Morgan Burnett. The Packers haven't been sharp at all, but it's not Aaron Rodgers fault: his receivers spent the first half acting like the pigskin was soaked in Vaseline.

It looks like, on its face, a classic case of a team that's "too well-rested" after having a three-week layoff. The Giants, on the other hand, are outgaining the Packers 311 to 170, and were it not for a few bad breaks and New York failing to find the end zone in both trips to the red zone, would probably be up several touchdowns.

If the Packers want a shot at repeating, they're going to need some serious adjustments at halftime.

For more NFL news, rumors and analysis, follow @EyeOnNFL on Twitter, Like Us on Facebook, subscribe to our NFL newsletter, and while you're add it, add our RSS Feed.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com