Tag:Vince Young
Posted on: February 21, 2012 1:10 pm
Edited on: February 21, 2012 5:01 pm
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2012 NFL Free Agency: Quarterback rankings

The 2012 free-agent quarterback class is an, um, diverse group. (Getty Images)
By Will Brinson

Leading up to the start of free agency on March 13, we're compiling lists of the best 2012 NFL free agents by position. These are the quarterbacks.

Though the list of free-agent quarterbacks for 2012 isn't necessarily the greatest crop of players in NFL history, it does have the potential to be one of the most intriguing in years, because of one man: Peyton Manning. Manning's saga is well-documented at this point; the back-and-forth between Manning's camp and Jim Irsay dominated the freaking Super Bowl.

Releasing him into the wild seems like a mere matter of timing. So we're going to take that assumption and add Manning to our lists of free agents. We're also including the Saints Drew Brees and 49ers Alex Smith on this list, since both are technically unrestricted free agents, until they receive the franchise tag from their respective teams. There's a better likelihood of Jimmy Clausen unseating Cam Newton than there is Brees not returning to New Orleans, but maybe someone in the Saints office will forget to fax in the franchise-tag paperwork.


Brees offseason could be interesting.  (Getty Images)

1. Drew Brees

Breakdown: The biggest problem for the Saints isn't that Brees might leave. He's not going to unless something really ridiculous happens. The biggest problem for the Saints is that if they're forced to use the franchise tag on Brees, they could end up losing Carl Nicks and Marques Colston. That won't make Brees any happier when it gets down to brass-tack negotiating.
Potential Landing Spots: Saints

2. Peyton Manning

Breakdown: Perhaps you've heard of Manning before. He's third all-time in passing yards (54,828). He's third all-time in passing touchdowns (399). He's won more MVPs than anyone in NFL history (four). And he's second in his own family with Super Bowl rings (one). That last item isn't a shot at Manning, though. It's the reason we believe he's not done when it comes to football, and that he'll come back to the game supremely motivated. No one knows whether or not he'll be fully healthy by the time the 2012 season begins. We do know he won't be fully healthy by the time March 13 rolls around, though. Which means that anyone who signs him will be engaging in a serious high-risk, high-reward game of chicken with Manning's neck.
Potential Landing Spots: Cardinals, Dolphins, Seahawks, Jets, Redskins

3. Matt Flynn

Breakdown: Flynn's attempted just 132 passes at the professional level, but 81 of them are pretty impressive. Those came in the only two starts of his career, when Flynn managed to go 55 of 81 for 731 yards, nine touchdowns and two interceptions. There are concerns that Flynn can't make every throw (right now) and that he might be a product of Green Bay's system. But that system's in Miami now, as former Packers quarterbacks coach Joe Philbin is the Dolphins head coach. If Miami doesn't make a run at Flynn when free agency opens up, that should be a big red flag for anyone else interested in Aaron Rodgers backup.
Potential Landing Spots: Dolphins, Seahawks, Redskins

4. Alex Smith

Breakdown: Smith resurrected his career under new 49ers coach Jim Harbaugh and, in the span of about two playoff minutes against the Saints, nearly flipped the entire narrative of his career. As it is, Smith's improvement in 2011 is impressive; according to Pro Football Focus, he had the third-highest accuracy percentage in the NFL (factoring in drops, throwaways and spikes) last year, behind only Aaron Rodgers and Drew Brees. Smith's said he isn't interested in leaving San Francisco, and Harbaugh's gotten his back publicly, even though there's zero chance they'll use the franchise tag on him.
Potential Landing Spots: 49ers
Henne could surprise in the right spot. (Getty Images)

5. Chad Henne

Breakdown: Miami drafting a quarterback in the second round: an April tradition unlike any other! But no, seriously, Henne's in a long line of signal-callers that the Dolphins took in the second round who didn't pan out. He's had serious problems with interceptions; Henne's got a 3.5 percent INT rate over his career and only nine of his 36 NFL games have not featured him throwing a pick. And Henne tends to look particularly robotic at times in the pocket (these things go hand in hand). But he's only 26 and it's not fair to blame him for all of Miami's woes the past three years. Henne can make all the throws and flashed some serious potential at times during his tenure in South Beach. He's the highest-upside backup quarterback out there and he's got several former coaches -- Brian Daboll, Tony Sparano -- coaching in spots that could use a backup quarterback.
Potential Landing Spots: Chiefs, Jets, Broncos

6. Jason Campbell

Breakdown: It's hard not to feel sympathetic for Campbell. The former Auburn star and first-round pick has had roughly 25 offensive coordinators since he started taking snaps in college and he's about to start out on his third NFL roster once the free-agency shuffling begins anew this year. He's 30 and hasn't played a full season in the past two years, either because of injury or being benched. The latter was for Bruce Gradkowski, so it's hard to tell what's worse for his reputation. He makes a lot of sense for a team that wants someone to push their starter without making a stink in the locker room.
Potential Landing Spots: Chiefs, Eagles, Jets

NFL Free Agency

7. Kyle Orton

Breakdown: Orton's was a "winner" with the Bears, he was a stat-hog for a season with the Broncos, he flirted with the Dolphins and finally he was a streak-killer with the Chiefs. He's not going to be anyone's starter in 2011, unless Washington seriously misplays everything in free agency and the draft (not out of the question). But he's an above-average backup in the NFL and could certainly compete with the starters that various teams -- KC, Washington, Jacksonville, for example -- will trot out in 2011. Orton doesn't want to deal with being a "stop-gap option" but it's unlikely he'll have a choice next year.
Potential Landing Spots:
Redskins, Chiefs, Jaguars, Bears, Broncos

8. David Garrard

Breakdown: Pete Prisco's second-favorite quarterback missed the entire 2011 season after the Jaguars cut him and he underwent surgery for a herniated disk in his back. There was interest in the 34-year-old last year after teams lost quarterbacks to injury, but he decided to recover from the surgery instead. While that's the smart move, Garrard won't find the market as friendly for his services this time, especially since his agent said on February 15 Garrard would be ready in "four to six weeks." Expect someone with a steady starter and tenuous backup to look to Garrard.
Potential Landing Spots: Bears, Broncos, Buccaneers, Rams, Raiders

9. Shaun Hill

Breakdown: Hill's 32 and not exactly a spring chicken. But he performed admirably in place of Matthew Stafford in 2010 and the fit between he and the Lions is a nice one. The Lions are tight with cap space, but Hill appears to like where he's at, and it's not like he'd break the bank in another location anyway.
Potential Landing Spots: Lions
VY's likely to remain a backup. (Getty Images)

10. Vince Young

Breakdown: Now seems like a good time to remind you that the guy who coined "Dream Team" in Philly was indeed the backup quarterback and someone on a one-year contract. His personality and turnovers will cause a problem for teams looking to sign him. Unless that team happens to run the read-option offense and could really use a mobile quarterback with success in the NFL to step in and freelance if/when Tim Tebow gets hurt/melts down.
Potential Landing Spots: Broncos

11. Rex Grossman

Breakdown: Did you know that Rex Grossman is actually "Rex Grossman III"? Poor Mike Shanahan had RG3 on his roster the whole time and didn't even know it. Sigh. Anyway, Grossman's not going to attract a lot of attention on the market, and nor should he. As the old saying goes, though, "love the one you're with." And Grossman and the Shanahans are with each other, even if Rex isn't starting next year. It would be surprising to see him playing anywhere else in 2012.
Potential Landing Spots: Redskins

HONORABLE MENTION

Unrestricted Free Agents: Dennis Dixon, Josh Johnson, Brady Quinn, Charlie Whitehurst, Donovan McNabb, Dan Orlovsky, Drew Stanton, Caleb Hanie, Charlie Batch, Kellen Clemens

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Posted on: December 14, 2011 10:14 am
Edited on: December 14, 2011 11:31 am
 

Film Room: Broncos vs. Patriots preview

Posted by Eye on Football Analyst Andy Benoit


It might just be the most anticipated matchup of the season: Tom Brady vs. Tim Tebow. One quarterback inspires because he has it all and wins, the other inspires because he has none of it and wins. Let’s break it down.


1. Evaluating Tebow
If you want a rehashing of Tebow’s quarterbacking strengths and (many) weaknesses, or an opinion on whether the Broncos should invest long-term in their unconventional “star”, or a theory about motivation and inspiration and divine intervention, hit the message boards or talk radio. The focus of this post is on what Tebow has shown on film the past few weeks.

In short, he’s getting better as a passer but still has a long ways to go. He’s been very good against Cover 2 looks. He made the Vikings pay for their frequent (and, frankly, mind-boggling) mistakes two weeks ago, and he conjured up several critical late-game completions the week after, when the Bears moved from man coverage to a soft Tampa 2 (where a few goofs by the secondary and a lack of pass-rush killed them down the stretch).

Tebow remains slow in the pocket – in terms of progressions, decisiveness and ball release – and he falls back on sandlot tactics if his first read is not there. This isn’t the worst thing, though, as he’s clearly proven to be clutch in this style. He’s very effective on the move, both as a scrambler and passer. He can extend the play with a unique Roethlisberger-like sense for avoiding and shedding pass-rushers.

But unless the Broncos can continue to win while averaging less than 20 points per game offensively, they’ll need more aerial dimension, progression reads and overall consistency from their young quarterback.

2. Denver’s run game
When offenses put a bunch of bodies on the line of scrimmage, the natural assumption is that they’re relying on sheer human mass to bulldoze the defense and clear a path for the running back. In actuality, what they’re often doing is creating more running options for the back. The more players there are along the line of scrimmage, the more gaps there are for the defense to worry about.

This is why you frequently see the Broncos bring a receiver in motion down to the tight end spot just before the snap; it’s not the receiver’s blocking prowess that the Broncos like, it’s that his presence expands the run front surface. Generally, the defense responds to this by matching players to gaps (in other words, crowding the line of scrimmage).

The brilliance of Denver’s zone-option run is that it forces defenses to crowd the line of scrimmage when there’s still the threat of a pass. Granted, this passing threat is weak – usually only two or three receivers run routes, and defenses are happy to see Tebow throw – but it’s not weak enough for defenders to completely ignore. Thus, they’re distracted ever so slightly from their run-stopping assignments.

More than that, the zone-option presents a myriad of run possibilities on a given play. The ball could go to Willis McGahee, fullback Spencer Larsen, a sweeping receiver or stay with Tebow. And with so many options, the ball does not necessarily have to follow the direction of the blocking scheme.

These are all factors that defenders must mentally process after the snap. That’s not how defenders are accustomed to playing the run.
Also, keep in mind, defenses do not generally account for quarterbacks in the run game; Tebow’s threat as a runner has a wildcat effect that gives the offense a numbers advantage if the D does not bring an eighth man in the box.

3. How the Patriots will defend the run
A smart, fundamentally-sound run-defending front seven can still stymie the zone-option. Usually, it takes two stud linebackers and two stud defensive ends. The Bears and Jets both had these resources and, aside from a play or two, they both shutdown the Broncos’ ground game. The Bears did it out of a base 4-4 (safety Craig Steltz played in the box all game); the Jets did it out of a base 3-5.

Whatever the defensive alignment, the basic principles are the same: the linebackers must see the field well enough to track the ball and identify gaps. More importantly, they must run well enough to catch up to the ball (because, as we’ve examined, defending the zone-option is strict assignment football, where the reads are more details-oriented than in conventional run defense). The defensive ends must have the physical strength to penetrate against one-on-one blocking, as well as the discipline to stay within the strict confines of their edge duties.

It’s unknown whether the Patriots will follow Chicago’s 4-4 scheme or New York’s 3-5 scheme Sunday. They’ve alternated between various defensive fronts all season. More pressing is whether the Patriots even have the personnel. Inside linebacker Jerod Mayo is elite, but whoever’s next to him is most certainly not (Bill Belichick has tried a litany of different players here). At left end, Vince Wilfork is obviously a monster.

On the defensive right side, Andre Carter has been outstanding at times, but he may not have the necessary size to trade blows with a left tackle like Ryan Clady for four quarters. If the Patriots go with a 3-5 approach, they may want to rotate massive youngsters Ron Brace and Brandon Deaderick at end and use Carter’s flexible movement skills in space (ala Calvin Pace of the Jets).

Keep in mind, the Broncos have a sound rushing attack even without the zone-option. McGahee has a league-leading six 100-yard games on the season, and his front five is capable of winning one-on-one battles across the board. The Patriots got abused last week by a Redskins rushing attack that entered the game ranked 31st.

4. Back to the air
It’s entirely possible that Tebow and the Broncos will be able to move the ball through the thin Mile High air this Sunday. The Patriots’ pass-rush has been more “miss” than “hit” in 2011. Their secondary currently features a journeyman special teamer at strong safety (James Ihedigbo), a wide receiver and career-long special teamer at free safety (Matthew Slater) and another wide receiver at nickelback (Julian Edelman).

That’s the type of lineup you only see when someone is screwing around playing Madden.

If the Patriots bring Ihedigbo into the box, they’ll have to play either Cover 3 (zone) or man-to-man downfield. Because defensive backs must face inside when playing Cover 3, the way to attack them is with outside routes. Broncos wideouts Eric Decker and Matt Willis are effective on these patterns.

In man, cornerbacks must obviously stay with their assigned wide receiver. This season, Kyle Arrington and Devin McCourty have simply not done that. Arrington improved his ball skills but has still been exploited. McCourty has been just plain porous.

5. Patriots previous blueprint for Tebow?
We’ve looked at how the Patriots might defend the Broncos offense as a whole. What about defending Tebow specifically? One player who is somewhat similar in style is Vince Young.

The Patriots devised a shrewd gameplan when they faced the Eagles backup in Week 12. Using a mix of 3-4 and 4-3 looks, they focused on keeping Young in the pocket, forcing him to be a passer. They did this by jamming his tight ends and wing/flex receivers with defensive ends and blitzing linebackers.

That disrupted a lot of Young’s quick outlet throws and forced him to make reads downfield. When Patriot blitzers did actually go after Young, they always came from the front side. That way, Young would see the blitz and instinctively scramble to the backside. On that backside would be a defensive end in containment.

At the end of the day, this approach generated three sacks and 21 incompletions for the Patriots defense.

6. Other side of the ball
Even though Tebow has been at his most comfortable throwing against Cover 2, the Patriots would presumably love to play that defense often this Sunday, as that’s the tactic they tend to fall back on when protecting a big lead. The reason Tebow has not had to put together four good quarters of even semi-traditional quarterbacking during this six-game win streak is because no team has managed to jump way out in front against the Denver defense.

New England will certainly look to change that. Expect some form of hurry-up early in the game. Even if playing with a lead weren’t extra important this week, Tom Brady would still come out throwing, as it’s difficult to run against Denver’s base 4-3 (their tackles Broderick Bunkley and Marcus Thomas hold ground well, and their linebackers all cover ground well).

Most offenses would prefer facing Denver’s nickel D. It’s a much easier group to run inside against, and the revolving door at No. 3 slot cornerback has been a weak spot for the Broncos since Day One. The Broncos will likely use their nickel D against the Patriots’ base 12 offense (one back, two tight ends, two wide receivers). This will make John Fox’s group somewhat vulnerable to the run, but Fox would rather see Brady handing off than throwing.

Because so much of New England’s offense is horizontal, it’s important for a defense to have as much speed at linebacker as possible. In this sense, nickel linebacker Wesley Woodyard is better suited than starter Joe Mays. What’s more, in nickel, the Broncos can go with three downlinemen and create more space for their excellent inside blitzers, Von Miller and D.J. Williams.

Generating pressure inside is a must against Brady. The only way to disrupt him is to move him off his spot and make him play frenetic. The more Brady moves, the less likely he is to throw between the numbers. That’s critical, as these statistics show:

                            Tom Brady 2011 Passing Stats
          Between the Numbers         Outside the Numbers
   COMP %
                  73.4                     54.7
    YPA                   9.44                     7.31
  QB Rating
                 118.2                     86.8

So who will win? Check our NFL expert picks for all Week 15 games

Follow @Andy_Benoit on Twitter or contact him at Andy.Benoit-at-NFLTouchdown.com.
Posted on: December 5, 2011 4:34 pm
 

Vick on Week 14: 'I'll definitely be out there'

Posted by Will Brinson



Saying that the Eagles season is "hanging in the balance" would be an insult to all the ornaments dangling periously on our Christmas tree right now, but the Eagles aren't "technically" eliminated, so there's still some hope for 2011, however slim.

Adding to that hope is the fact that Michael Vick says he'll "definitely" return in Week 14 against the Dolphins.

"Yeah, absolutely," Vick told reporters after practice on Monday. "This Sunday I’ll definitely be out there. I feel like I’ve got to be accountable for my team. I want to be there. You know, I just want to get back to doing what I love to do, and that’s playing the game of football. There’s nothing in this world like the game.

"I put my heart and soul into it, man, and I just wish I could have been out there the last three weeks, but it just hasn’t panned out that way. We’ve got to keep our heads up and keep moving in the right direction."

Everything's obviously not all roses in Philly, as the Eagles are 4-8. Plus, Vick says his injured ribs still aren't fully healed.

"I won’t say they’re 100-percent, but we’ve still got a week to go, I get better each and every day," Vick said. "Still working hard in the treatment room to try to get better, but I went out and had a great practice and I feel good."

It doesn't make much sense to bring Vick back unless he's actually ready, but the Eagles have been pretty patient by keeping him on the bench over the past three weeks as they went 1-2 with Vince Young struggling under center.

And while there's no reason to get any hope up about a potential run to the playoffs, it is still possible. All the Eagles have to do is win out (4-0, obviously) and have the Cowboys go 1-3 and the Giants go 2-2.

That scenario is made difficult by the fact that the Cowboys and Giants play each other twice -- someone has to win ... but someone has to lose, too! -- but I suppose weirder things have happened.


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Posted on: December 2, 2011 3:04 pm
Edited on: December 2, 2011 3:09 pm
 

Reid takes issue with media portrayal of Jackson

Reid says he's 'proud' of the way Jackson played Thursday night.  (Getty Images)

Posted by Ryan Wilson

The blowback following DeSean Jackson's three-catch, 34-yard effort against the Seahawks Thursday night was swift -- and expected. Jackson had been benched earlier in the season for missing a meeting, and last week, he was on the sidelines for the fourth quarter of the Eagles' loss to the Patriots after he dropped two touchdown passes. At the time, head coach Andy Reid suggested that the move was to give "other guys an opportunity" but added that Jackson "has to do a better job."

DeSean's forgettable season
On Friday, hours after the Seahawks systematically dismantled the Eagles, Reid defended his enigmatic star wide receiver, especially after NFL Network showed Jackson several times on the sidelines staring blankly into space as quarterback Vince Young talked to him.

"You can take a camera and make it look any way you want to make it look." Reid said at his day after news conference, according to the Philadelphia Daily News. "I am telling you, that kid was all in last night and wanted to win that game as much as anybody."

That wasn't evident by watching the telecast. And even one of Jackson's teammates, asked if Jackson was completely in the game, said "No, he's [messing] around."

Still, the shot of Jackson appearing to ignore Young was the biggest topic during the post-game media session.

"There was nothing on the sidelines, no commotion with him and Vince," Reid said. "There is nothing there. Nothing. I am not sure they know who's talking to who and so on and what the conversation is about. Not knowing the language, I don't know how you are able to go into that stuff ... This is petty stuff."

Ironically, the NFL Network's Deion Sanders, Marshall Faulk, Michael Irvin and Steve Mariucci -- all former players or coaches -- agreed that the media treated Jackson unfairly Thursday night. (Below left: Jackson tires of silly questions. Below right: the NFL Network crew defends Jackson.)


Unlike previous weeks, Reid had no issue with Jackson's effort against the Seahawks.

"That kid was all in and I was very proud of him."

It's a nice sentiment but the Eagles are 4-8. And if things continue down this path, both Reid and Jackson could be elsewhere in 2012.

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Posted on: December 2, 2011 9:20 am
Edited on: December 2, 2011 12:27 pm
 

Teammate thinks Jackson is '[messing] around'

Jackson isn't interested in talking to reporters about the current state of his game. (Getty Images)

Posted by Ryan Wilson

The big story this morning isn't that that Marshawn Lynch has come out of nowhere to be one of the league's best running backs this season. Or that "the plan" Pete Carroll referred during training camp really does include Tarvaris Jackson, who has played well in recent weeks.

DeSean's forgettable season
Instead, as is often the case anytime the Eagles play, the big story is DeSean Jackson, the mercurial wide receiver in the last year of this rookie contract who plays with all the urgency of a shorts and t-shirt minicamp workout. Following Philly's latest loss, a 31-14 effort against the Seahawks on Thursday night, Jackson admitted that he's "frustrated with losing," but when one of his teammates was asked if Jackson was completely in the game he said, "No, he's [messing] around." 

If the plan is to sleepwalk through the current season for his current team and alienate the 31 others that might've had interested during free agency then mission accomplished, DeSean.  Otherwise, we have no idea what Jackson's doing and his "plan," unlike Pete Carroll's, is not only ill-conceived but it's going to cost him a lot of money.

Against the Seahawks, Jackson finished the game with four catches for 34 yards. Alone those numbers don't mean much. Without watching you might think that the Seahawks double-teamed Jackson, or that maybe the game plan was to feature LeSean McCoy. And at times, both were true. But Jackson's performance is mostly about his apparent unwillingness to … well, try.

"Actually there were quite a few plays called for him," head coach Andy Reid said. "They were making an effort to double him and move a safety in."

CBSSports.com's Mike Freeman wrote Friday morning about Jackson staring into oblivion while quarterback Vince Young tried to talk to him on the sidelines.

"If that's what they saw, that's what they saw," Jackson said of the cameras, according to the Philadelphia Inquirer. "I don't have to sit here and answer them questions. My teammates know what it is."

And during pregame warm-ups, Jackson was hanging out with the defensive ends as the other wide receivers worked together.

"I'm not answering none of that type of question," said Jackson. "If you're going to ask something about the game, do that. . . . Next question."

Two weeks ago, Jackson told NFL Network's Michael Irvin that he's in the Larry Fitzgerald-Calvin Johnson range when it comes to his worth. Fitz makes $15 million this season, Megatron almost $9 million.

"I think right in that range," he said at the time. "Maybe top-5 in the NFL. ...My playmaking skills and abilities, my punt returns, and the ability to get the ball and score on any play. I mean, Fitzgerald, he's a special receiver -- don't get me wrong -- but he doesn't play special teams so that adds an extra edge to it."

In theory, yes. In practice, Fitzgerald has been just as dangerous on special teams this season as Jackson. And much more consistent at wide receiver, and that's with John Skelton throwing him passes.

NFL Network's Marshall Faulk got it right two weeks ago: "Showing up to any meeting late is definitely not a good way to handle (things) when you want money from a team."

Not showing up at all is even worse.

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Posted on: December 1, 2011 11:54 pm
Edited on: December 2, 2011 12:07 am
 

In dismal year, Eagles give terrible performance

Philadelphia continues to play poorly for Andy Reid (AP).Posted by Josh Katzowitz

All week long, radio hosts have wondered about the hot seat of Andy Reid, and each time they ask me, I say, “No, I think Reid is fine. He’ll have to fire some of his assistant coaches, but he’ll survive because of his resume. And besides, if Reid is fired, it won’t be long before Philly fans miss him.”

I’m beginning to think I might be wrong.

The Eagles looked horrendous for most of their 31-14 loss to the Seahawks on Thursday night, and though I still believe Reid deserves another year (defensive coordinator Juan Castillo, I believe, does not), his team isn’t doing him any favors.

On the first play from scrimmage, Vince Young threw a disappointing interception (everybody on Twitter wrote at the same time: “Where in the hell was VY throwing?”), and Philadelphia struggled to get on track. Marshawn Lynch broke what seemed like a half-dozen Eagles tackles en route to his first touchdown run, and on his second, the gap vacated by Philadelphia’s defenders was immense.

The Eagles had a tough time stopping Lynch, the human Skittle-eating machine who rushed for 148 yards and two scores on 22 carries, and even quarterback Tarvaris Jackson (13 of 16, 190 yards, one touchdown) was efficient.

And then there’s DeSean Jackson. It’s hard to figure what’s running through his head lately. It’ll be tough, after all, to get paid a significant amount of money as a free agent when Riley Cooper is outplaying you. There’s been talk that the Eagles might simply franchise-tag him for next season and then trade him away, but at this point, Jackson isn’t giving his team much of anything. Including, it seems, much effort.

Though it was a touch unfair of the NFL Network to continue showing Jackson appear to ignore Young when the quarterback appeared to be trying to instruct Jackson -- we can’t really know if Jackson was truly ignoring him based on what we were shown -- but the fact he just sat there staring straight ahead while Young’s lips moved wasn’t the greatest PR move.

If it looks like you don’t care, it’s not the height of hyperbole to say that the people who could give him a ton of money also believe that he doesn’t care. That obviously doesn’t help his market value, especially when sideline reports said Jackson wasn’t talking to his teammates (he didn’t have a problem, though, talking to his old Cal buddy Lynch when Nnamdi Asomugha lay on the turf with an injury).

After the game, Philadelphia Inquirer beat writer Jeff McLane asked one of the Eagles what was up with Jackson? Responded the player: "He's f------ around." When he talked to the media afterward, Jackson said he was frustrated with losing but not with his role on the team. He also didn't want to talk about any dissension on the team. After taking a few of those questions, Jackson turned back into his locker and stopped speaking with reporters.

But Jackson is only one problem, and as we’ve seen for most of the season, the blame for the Eagles season can’t be placed on only one player or one unit or even one side of the ball. You have to believe at this point that it’s an atmosphere problem. The person in charge of that, of course, is Reid. Who will continue to face immense heat after this loss.

He still has time to save his job -- and I still think he should keep it -- but he’s also beginning to change my mind.

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Posted on: December 1, 2011 9:46 pm
Edited on: December 2, 2011 8:26 am
 

Asomugha knocked out of Seattle game with stinger

N. Asomugha injured himself on this play (AP).

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

UPDATE (10:31 p.m. ET): Asomugha will not return to the game with a concussion and a stinger.

With Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie not active Thursday night vs. the Seahawks, one-third of the so-called best secondary in the league did not start vs. Seattle. Now, the Eagles have lost another one.

While attempting to intercept a Vince Young pass, Eagles cornerback Nnamdi Asomugha was taken down by Seahawks receiver Mike Williams and appeared to suffer a head injury. While Williams seemed to interfere with Asomugha, no penalty was called, and it appeared that Williams accidently landed on Asomugha’s head as they both tumbled to the turf.

Asomugha slowly walked off the field under his own power, though he looked somewhat woozy, and he immediately went to the locker room. The Eagles are calling it a neck injury and are saying that Asomugha is being evaluated for a head injury. His return to the game is questionable.

Meanwhile, Eagles special teams standout Colt Anderson is out for the game with a knee injury.

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Posted on: November 28, 2011 10:05 am
 

Report: Eagles assistants had to be separated

Posted by Josh Katzowitz

As if things couldn’t get any worse in Philadelphia, there were reports after the Eagles 38-20 loss to the Patriots that assistant coaches Marty Mornhinweg and Jim Washburn got into a verbal confrontation on the sideline and actually had to be separated before it got physical.

Week 12 in review
And it actually occurred when Philadelphia was still leading New England.

According to CSN Philly, the two have not had problems with each other before, and while there’s been no official word on why the two went after each other on the sideline Sunday, the Philadelphia Daily News speculated that Washburn -- the defensive line coach -- didn’t appreciate the play-calling of Mornhinweg, the offensive coordinator.

Particularly during the second quarter when the Patriots were in the middle of a 17-point spree and Mornhinweg continued calling for pass after pass (you’ll note that Vince Young threw for 400 yards but LeSean McCoy only recorded 10 carries). At one point, the Eagles went three-and-out on three incomplete passes, not giving Philadelphia’s defense enough time to rest.

Which might have contributed to a terrible second quarter for the Eagles defense. Not to mention an upset Washburn.

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